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I have committed changes to Git and pushed to origin. Another developer was having trouble merging. They did something and did a push. I saw an update and did a pull and half my changes were reverted! What happened? I'm guessing they had merge conflicts and used their version of the file but even so I can't find any history of my work in Git?

I'm using SourceTree and not quite comfortable with it yet. I've just installed Smart Git (more familiar with it) but not finding anything useful to discover what happened in either.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In SmartGit, open the Log and use Query|Load All Commits. This should give you your commits temporarily back, so you can add a branch to make them accessible again. After that either Merge, Rebase or Cherry-Pick your changes to master (assuming it's master you and your team is working on).

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I opened the Log window and from the menu bar I select Query. It has Show Changes, Compare with local and Save As. All are grayed out. –  1.21 gigawatts Oct 17 '12 at 19:54
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Be sure to invoke Log on the repository root, then Load All Commits will be available. SmartGit basically does what Michael writes: show you all commits from the reflog, but in a more convenient way than from command line. –  mstrap Oct 18 '12 at 8:44
    
That did it! Thanks –  1.21 gigawatts Oct 18 '12 at 16:11

If you are able to use the command-line, git log should show you all the commits.

If you have already pulled locally, then you can use the reflog to unwind what has happened. http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/git-reflog.html

You can then unwind if necessary and branch or cherry-pick to a new branch.

Or you can revert the merge. http://git-scm.com/2010/03/02/undoing-merges.html

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