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Given a very large text file, I want to remove all the words which occur only once in the file. Is there any easy and efficient way of doing it?

Best regards,

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6  
What have you tried? –  Rohit Jain Oct 17 '12 at 20:26
4  
How large is "very large" –  mgilson Oct 17 '12 at 20:27
1  
Does the file need to stay in order? Is the list sorted? –  Jeremy J Starcher Oct 17 '12 at 20:28
    
nltk word count -> get all words with one occurrence -> remove with regex –  swasheck Oct 17 '12 at 20:28
    
The file may be of GB size, the number of lines may be a few millions. The output file should not have any word with frequency one. In other words, these rare words are simply deleted from the file, everything else will remain the same. Best regards, –  Dibyendu Oct 17 '12 at 20:35

3 Answers 3

You'll have to do 2 passes through the file:

In pass 1:

  • Build a dictionary using the words as keys and their occurrences as values (i.e. each time you read a word, add 1 to its value in the dictionary)
  • Then pre-process the list to remove all keys with a value greater than 1. This is now your "blacklist"

In pass 2:

  • Read through the file again and remove any word that has a match in the blacklist.

Run-time:

  • Linear time to read the file in both passes.
  • It takes O(1) to add each word to the dictionary / increment its value in pass 1.
  • It takes O(n) to pre-process the dictionary into the blacklist.
  • It takes O(1) for the blacklist look-up in pass 2.

O(n) complexity

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Pass 2 goes trough the file again, so also O(N) like pass 1. –  Benjamin Bannier Oct 17 '12 at 20:57
1  
Dictionary operations are O(1). –  ovgolovin Oct 17 '12 at 21:03
    
"Linear time to read the file in both passes" –  sampson-chen Oct 17 '12 at 21:03
    
@ovgolovin I believe they are O(log n) if number of keys is sufficiently large; but in this case if we are assuming a natural language, the set of all possible valid words would make the look-up O(1), since this set is a relatively fixed number. –  sampson-chen Oct 17 '12 at 21:05
1  
@sampson-chen Dictionary is implemented with hash-table. So there is no reason for the complexity to be O(log(n)). –  ovgolovin Oct 17 '12 at 21:06

2 passes through the file are definitely necessary. However, if the rare words are truly rare then you can skip tokenizing large sections of the file on the second pass. First do a word by word pass through the file and build a dictionary that contains the found location for words encountered once or a placeholder value for words encountered twice.

MULTI_WORD = -1
word_locations = {}

for pos, word in tokenize(input_file):
    if word not in word_locations:
        word_locations[word] = pos
    else:
        word_locations[word] = MULTI_WORD

Then you can filter out the positions where you need to do edits and do a plain copy on the rest:

edit_points = [(pos, len(word)) for word, pos in word_locations.iteritems()
                                if pos != MULTI_WORD]

start_pos = 0
for end_pos, edit_length in edit_points:
    input_file.seek(start_pos)
    output_file.write(input_file.read(end_pos - start_pos))
    start_pos = end_pos + edit_length
input_file.seek(start_pos)
output_file.write(input_file.read())

You might want a couple of more optimizations, like a block wise copy procedure to save on memory overhead and special case for no edit points.

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you coud also use memory mapping, and then use seek to delete the words. –  root Oct 17 '12 at 21:27

It's hard to know without specific code to refer to, but a good place to start might be the Natural Language Toolkit for Python.

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The file may be of GB size, the number of lines may be a few millions. The output file should not have any word with frequency one. In other words, these rare words are simply deleted from the file, everything else will remain the same. Best regards, –  Dibyendu Oct 17 '12 at 20:34
    
I think @sampson-chen's answer will work out best for you then. –  Nisan.H Oct 17 '12 at 20:45

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