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I have tried to implement a "template template template" - template class to fullfill my needs ( I am quite new in using template metaprogramming). Unfortunately, I have found the following topic too late: Template Template Parameters

Nevertheless, I need to implement something like listed below.

According to the compiler the last typedef is not working. I am not sure, but I think this is due to the limitation of 3x template restriction. Is there any possibility to bypass a 3xtemplate definition in this simple example?

template < typename TValueType >
class ITTranslator
{
public:
    ITTranslator() = 0;
    virtual ~ITTranslator() = 0;
    virtual void doSomething() = 0;
}

template < typename TValueType >
class TConcreteTranslator1 : public ITTranslator<TValueType>
{
public:
    TConcreteTranslator1(){}
    ~TConcreteTranslator1(){}
    void doSomething() {}
}

template < typename TValueType >
class TConcreteTranslator2 : public ITTranslator<TValueType>
{
public:
    TConcreteTranslator2(){}
    ~TConcreteTranslator2(){}
    void doSomething() {}
}

template < 
    typename TValueType, 
    template < typename TValueType > class TTranslatorValueType 
    >
class ITClassifier
{
public:
    ITClassifier() = 0;
    virtual ~ITClassifier() = 0;
}

template < 
    typename TValueType, 
    template < typename TValueType > class TTranslatorValueType 
    >
class TConcreteClassifier1 : public ITClassifier<TValueType,TTranslatorValueType >
{
public:
    TConcreteClassifier1() {}
    ~TConcreteClassifier1() {}
    void dodo(){}
}


template < 
    typename TValueType,
    template <typename TValueType> class TTranslatorValueType,
    template <template<typename TValueType> class TTranslatorValueType> class TClassifierValueType
 >
class ITAlgorithm
{
public:
    ITAlgorithm()=0;
    virtual ~TAlgorithm()=0;
    virtual run() = 0;
}


template < 
    typename TValueType,
    template <typename TValueType> class TTranslatorValueType,
    template <template<typename TValueType> class TTranslatorValueType> class TClassifierValueType
 >
class TConcreteAlgorithm1 : public ITAlgorithm<TValueType,TTranslatorValueType,TTranslatorValueType>
{
public:
    TConcreteAlgorithm1 (){}
    ~TConcreteAlgorithm1 (){}
    run()
    {
        TClassifierValueType< TTranslatorValueType>* l_classifier_pt = new TClassifierValueType< TTranslatorValueType>( );
        // add this object to a internal list...
    }
}



int main()
{
    typedef TConcreteTranslator1< cvbase::uint32_t > translator_t;
    typedef TConcreteClassifier1< cvbase::uint32_t, TConcreteTranslator1> classifier_t;
    typedef TConcreteAlgorithm1 < cvbase::uint32_t, TConcreteTranslator1, TConcreteClassifier1> algorithm_t; // not possible
    return 0;
}

Thanks a lot, I really appreciate any help!

EDIT: I have extended my listing (I am pretty sure it will not compile :)) to show the motivation why I am using my weird concept :)

share|improve this question
    
template template parameters are almost never the solution to any problem. That statement is not as much true as it used not be before we had variadic templates and so variadic template template parameters, but they are still pretty unusable. –  pmr Oct 17 '12 at 21:00
    
what is a "template template class"? do you mean a "template template-parameter"? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 17 '12 at 21:05
    
As far as I can see, a template^3 parameter would only be useful to limit the range of accepted types. You still instantiate TAlgorithm with TClassifier and not TClassifier<something> (which btw has 2 templ params) and have no use of the template^n parameter names for n > 1. –  dyp Oct 17 '12 at 21:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is really no need to pass template template parameter around here. Usually you can just take a normal template argument and provide a reasonable default:

template<typename ValueType>
struct translator {};

template<typename ValueType, typename Translator = translator<ValueType>>
struct Classifier {};

template<typename ValueType, 
         typename Translator = translator<ValueType>, 
         typename Classifier = classifier<ValueType, Translator>
         >
struct Algorithm {};

This is done the same way for allocator aware containers.

And please do away with the horrible hungarian-notation prefixes.

NB: It seems from your usage of constructors and destructors that you don't really have a grasp of basic C++. You might want to stay away from templates before you have understood easier concepts.

share|improve this answer
    
There's a > missing in the second template decl. (couldn't edit as it was only one character) –  dyp Oct 17 '12 at 21:12
    
what is a template template? are you talking about member templates? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 17 '12 at 21:13
    
this is only the topic of the question which is linked –  bobby Oct 17 '12 at 21:26
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb grepping my post reveals only one mentioning of template template which is immediatly followed by parameter. I guess another way to say this is template template argument. Is one term better than the other? I can find both uses in N3376. –  pmr Oct 17 '12 at 21:39
    
@soxx I try to show that what you try to do is essentially unnecessary and does not really work in the general case. –  pmr Oct 17 '12 at 21:40

Yes it is possible to avoid template template parameters (of any level).

A template is basically a type-level function. You feed it a type, and get another type back.

A template template parameter is itself a type-level function, and a template that accepts such parameter is a higher-order type-level function.

It is possible to implement higher-order type-level functions with member templates, without ever using template template parameters. I'm not really sure you need it for your design, but here's a quick and dirty example:

// regular type, a.k.a. zeroth-order type-level function, 
// a.k.a. "type of kind *"
struct N
{
    int a;
};

// a first-order type-level function, a.k.a. "type of kind *->*"
// it is wrapped in a regular type
struct B
{
    template <class A> struct Impl
    {
        void foo(A a)
        {
            int aa = a.a;
        }
    };
};

// a second-order type-level function 
// that accepts a (wrapped) first-order type function
// and also a regular type. the kind of it would be (*->*)->*->*
// it applies its first argument to its second argument
struct Z
{
    template <class X, class Y> struct Impl
    {
        typename X::template Impl<Y> ya;
        void bar()
        {
            ya.foo(Y());
        }
    };
};

// now this is something: a third-order type-level function
// that accepts a (wrapped) second-order type-level function
// and a (wrapped) first-order type-level function
// and a zeroth-order type-level function
// it applies its first argument to its second and third arguments
// it is also wrapped in a regular type for consistency
// try to figure out its kind
struct T
{
    template <class P, class Q, class R> struct Impl 
    {
        typename P::template Impl<Q, R> yb;
        void baz()
        {
          yb.bar();
        }
    };
};

T::Impl<Z, B, N> tt;
share|improve this answer

In this case you don't really need to have template parameters, basically the only variable type is TValueType right? The other types can be resolved on the class body using TValueType.

Something like this:

template < 
    typename TValueType
 >
class TAlgorithm
{
public:
    // TTranslator <TValueType> whatever
    // TTranslatorValueType <TValueType> whatever
    TAlgorithm(){}
    ~TAlgorithm(){}
}
share|improve this answer

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