Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

// I need help with my else if statement. If the word begins with a vowel, you add way to the end of the word. If the word begins with a consonant, you put that consonant on the end and add ay.

My problem is if I have a word with a vowel as the first letter, it runs through as if it has a consonant. If I type "are", I get "arewayreaay" instead of "areway".

public class piglatin {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String str = IO.    readString();    
        String answer = "";

        if(str.startsWith("a"))
            System.out.print(str + "way");

        if(str.startsWith("e"))
            System.out.print(str + "way");

        if(str.startsWith("i"))
            System.out.print(str + "way");

        if(str.startsWith("o"))
            System.out.print(str + "way");

        if(str.startsWith("u"))
            System.out.print(str + "way");
        else{
            char i = str.charAt(0);
            answer = str.substring( 1, str.length());
            System.out.print(answer + i + "ay");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Something that could help reduce this kind of confusion in the future is to put braces around the body of your if statement even if it is only 1 line of execution. –  FGreg Oct 17 '12 at 21:18
add comment

4 Answers

if(str.startsWith("a") || str.startsWith("e") || str.startsWith("i") ... (and so on)) {
  System.out.print(str + "way"); 
} else{
  char i = str.charAt(0);
  answer = str.substring( 1, str.length());
  System.out.print(answer + i + "ay");
}

or if / else if / else

Explanation:

//  combine all the if blocks together .. if you dont it checks for vowel 'a' and prints
//  'areay' then it checks for vowel 'u' and enters the else block .. where it again
//  operates on 'are' (check immutability of strings) gets charAt(0) i.e 'a' and prints
//  'rea' and since you concatenated 'ay' ... the final output = 'arewayreaay'
share|improve this answer
add comment

Note that each of your leading if cases does the same work, and so you can instead collapse all of those into a single branch:

if (str.startsWith("a") || str.startsWith("e") || ...
    System.out.print(str + "way");
else
{
    // do the substring and append "ay"

Aside from collapsing those branches, your problem is that each of your if statements after the first needs an else:

if(str.startsWith("a"))
    System.out.print(str + "way");
else if(str.startsWith("e"))
    System.out.print(str + "way");
// ...

You only want one of your branches to execute. But consider what happens in your final if/else: you've already modified e.g., "are" as the result of your first if statement. Since you aren't using chained if/else, you'll get to your final set of tests:

if(str.startsWith("u"))
    System.out.print(str + "way");
else{

And you'll end up in the else case, since your string doesn't start with "u". But you've already handled the string in an earlier if statement.

share|improve this answer
add comment

What you have here is not a switch - the else is only attaching to the final if. Replace each if with else if, other than the first one, or combine the conditions like jakub suggested.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I think your curly braces are messed up. It executes the "if starts with" for 'a' but then also does the "else" for "u" ... so you get both. You may mean:

public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    String str = IO.readString();
    String answer = "";

    if (str.startsWith("a"))
         System.out.print(str + "way");
    else if(str.startsWith("e"))
        System.out.print(str + "way");
    else if(str.startsWith("i"))
        System.out.print(str + "way");
    else if(str.startsWith("o"))
        System.out.print(str + "way");
    else if(str.startsWith("u"))
        System.out.print(str + "way");
    else
    {
        char i = str.charAt(0);
        answer = str.substring( 1, str.length());
        System.out.print(answer + i + "ay");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.