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I am having a rather frustrating problem with the jquery post function that probably stems from not understanding how it works correctly.

I have a function that should post some form information to a php script that I wrote and that script then runs curl requests against an API to get around the cross-domain policy of javascript. It seems to work fine as long as it submits to "http" but when I send it to "https" the form never gets submitted.

I ran wireshark on my computer and it showed no traffic towards the destination ip until I made the url use http. I have basic auth on the server so I am passing the user and password through the url, but tested without that there and got the same results.

Here is the not working code:

$j.post("https://<api user>:<password>@<ip>:444/ProxyScript.php", 
         $j("#spoke_ticket").serialize(),
         function(msg) { 
              log_status(msg);
              fade_status();
              $j(':input','#createtheticket')
                   .not(':button, :submit, :reset, :hidden')
                   .val('')
                   .removeAttr('checked')
                   .removeAttr('selected');
               });

Here is the working function:

$j.post("http://<other ip>/ProxyScript.php",  
        $j("#spoke_ticket").serialize(),
        function(msg) { 
              log_status(msg);
              fade_status();
              $j(':input','#createtheticket')
                   .not(':button, :submit, :reset, :hidden')
                   .val('')
                   .removeAttr('checked')
                   .removeAttr('selected');
               });

Any ideas as to why the traffic is not being sent? Let me know if I left out some key information or anything.

Thanks for the help

share|improve this question
    
any messages in the javascript log? –  Jan Dvorak Oct 17 '12 at 21:02
2  
Check out this question Could be cross domain depending on whether your client page is on https also –  NuclearGhost Oct 17 '12 at 21:05
    
I ran it with firebug and the chrome debug console and it does not register anything...good or bad. With http I can see responses from the script and everything as I should. –  Weston Boone Oct 17 '12 at 21:06
    
@NuclearGhost Yeah I saw that post. I already have header('Access-Control-Allow-Origin: *'); in my script. It should not be a cross domain problem though since the traffic is not even getting to it to be potentially denied –  Weston Boone Oct 17 '12 at 21:11
    
Please note that the traffic is denied at the client level - the browser is the one which refuses to make the call, not the server. To make things worse, most browsers silently fail without anything in the message log. Are you sure you're sending the Access-Control-Allow-Origin with all your responses, at the server-side ? –  Marius Danila Oct 17 '12 at 21:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Why not use a proxy to get over the cross-domain issue? It sounds more easy. An simple example is when i want to retrieve the danish administration national geo-data for counties,road names and so on (lucky for me, their data is in json or XML optional)

simplified proxy.php

<?
header('Content-type: application/json');
$url=$_GET['url'];
$html=file_get_contents($url);
echo $html;
?>

in ajax, get the lat/longs for a county borderline

var url= "proxy.php?url=https://geo.oiorest.dk/"+type+"/"+nr+"/graense.json";           
$.ajax({
  url: url,
  dataType: 'json',
  success:  function (data) {
   ...

}); 

notice the https - the url could be, real example, https://geo.oiorest.dk/kommuner/0810/graense.json

share|improve this answer
    
This is already a proxy script so I would rather not make a proxy to my proxy.. and I am not sure that I could –  Weston Boone Oct 17 '12 at 23:27
    
Turns out they have a very undocumented proxy service so I am exploring that route now and it looks... promising –  Weston Boone Oct 21 '12 at 21:50

If you are doing the AJAX post from a http page to a https URL then the Cross-Domain policy kicks in because the protocol is also part of the origin specification, as it is described here. The browser will refuse to make the AJAX call, so that's why you're not seeing any traffic.

A solution is discussed here:

Ajax using https on an http page

So your best bet is the Access-Control-Allow-Origin header which should be supported on most modern browsers now.

So make your server add the following header to the responses:

Access-Control-Allow-Origin: https://www.mysite.com

If for some reason you cannot enforce this, then the only choice left would be JSONP.

share|improve this answer
    
It is from an https to an https, but the javascript is being loaded as a widget through an application that I do not have control of (Zendesk) so it might be loaded from an http source I suppose... That does sound like the symptoms I am seeing. The port may be a problem too. –  Weston Boone Oct 17 '12 at 21:19
    
Yes, the port is also part of the origin. –  Marius Danila Oct 17 '12 at 21:20
    
You may need to enforce the header on the application which hosts the page that loads your js code. If you do not have access to it, I think JSONP might be your only choice left. –  Marius Danila Oct 17 '12 at 21:25

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