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I want to allow a locals object to have all its variables be within the scope when a function is called. For example:

function test() {
  console.log(string)
}

var locals = {
  string: 'test'
}

function callTest(fn, locals) {
  // INSERT MAGIC
  fn()
}

callTest(test, locals) // -> should log 'test' without any errors

What I'm trying to avoid:

function(locals) {
  with (locals) {
    console.log(string)
  }
}

Use case: I want to create a templating system with a callback. The locals should really be locals, not a "locals" object.

module.exports = function(callback) {
  callback(null, string)
}

Yes, I can do the following, but it's ugly. For now, this is how I'm doing it:

module.exports = function(locals, callback) {
  callback(null, locals.string)
}

Is this possible at all, or even in any programming language?

share|improve this question
1  
1. when you care about the acceptance rate, you care more about the points and the game than actually helping people 2. i've tried to get it up by going through every single one but my questions are either for opinions or no one actually answered them correctly. –  Jonathan Ong Oct 17 '12 at 22:56
    
That's what function arguments are for. –  JCOC611 Oct 17 '12 at 22:57
    
it doesn't matter. my question isn't how to fix a my use-case scenario, but to solve this particular problem. –  Jonathan Ong Oct 17 '12 at 22:59
    
True. However, particular problems shouldn't be an excuse to a bad programming practice. –  JCOC611 Oct 17 '12 at 23:01
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3 Answers

Not sure I understand exactly, but how about this: (does log 'test')

function test( locals ) {
    console.log( locals.string );
}

var locals = {
    string: 'test';
}

function callTest(fn, locals) {
    // INSERT MAGIC
  fn( locals );
}

callTest(test, locals); // -> should log 'test' without any errors
share|improve this answer
    
this solves the problem, but does not answer the question. –  Jonathan Ong Oct 17 '12 at 22:59
    
OK, so what exactly is the question? –  Kevin Boucher Oct 17 '12 at 23:00
    
i updated it to be more specific –  Jonathan Ong Oct 17 '12 at 23:39
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I know you aren't looking for alternatives (in terms of solving your issue). I won't argue with that. The only thing I can think of, without using global variables or function arguments (which would be the normal way to do it):

function test() {
    console.log( this.string );
}

function callTest(fn, locals) {
    // INSERT MAGIC
    fn.call(locals);
}

var locals = {
    string: 'test';
}

callTest(test, locals);

The only discrepancy with your requirements is that locals becomes this.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, thought about it. but then things get annoying when you have callbacks, so i would rather just use locals. –  Jonathan Ong Oct 17 '12 at 23:12
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Either use context properties (this.property) or read the linked article and use the Function constructor which can absolutely get you what you want.

 Templating without the with Statement

share|improve this answer
    
looked into it and it worked, but the problem now is that I don't know how to keep the scope within test since I basically have to rewrite the function. ex.: var txt = 'asdf'; function test() {console.log(string + txt)}; –  Jonathan Ong Oct 18 '12 at 2:31
    
The Function constructor creates a function that can only access the global scope + the arguments and context you provide. What do you need the closure for in a templating system? If you have helper functions, pass them as arguments along with the locals. –  Jan Kuča Oct 18 '12 at 8:54
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