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I installed Rails 3.2.8 using RailsInstaller on Windows 7 64bit (Ruby 1.9.3). I then created a .irbrc file in my %HOME% directory - C:\Users\Username with the following content:

def h obj
    puts "This object is #{obj}"
end

If I use irb in the command line, I can access that method in .irbrc. However, when I fire up rails c, the method is not accessible, which means the .irbrc file is not loaded by rails c.

Could anyone please help me figure out why is irb able to load the .irbrc file, but rails console is not loading it at all?

Thank you

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1 Answer 1

I tried your example on a Rails 3.2.1 application on Windows 7, and .irbrc file was loaded in the rails console.

Nothing unusual with the PATH variable; it just points to C:\RailsInstaller\Git\cmd;C:\Program Files\RailsInstaller\Ruby1.9.3\bin

Try setting the IRBRC variable as Dr. Nic suggests at the bottom of this blogpost: http://drnicwilliams.com/2006/10/12/my-irbrc-for-consoleirb/

An old Stack Overflow question How do I get IRBRC running on Win32 for Ruby console? could give some clues as well.

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Thanks Prakash. I have tried all of those already, but unfortunately none of those works. I don't think an IRBRC variable is necessary for the console to pick it up because irb can pick up the .irbrc file without me setting the IRBRC variable. That being said, I did try setting the variable, but that didn't work either. I tried setting it to %HOME%\_irbrc, %HOME%\.irbrc and %HOME%\\_irbrc along with some other variations in case Windows prefers another way of stating directories. Did you do gem install rails or did you use the rails installer? –  user14412 Oct 18 '12 at 4:08
    
I started with the rails installer. –  Prakash Murthy Oct 18 '12 at 13:50

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