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Goal:

Responsive CSS circles that:

  1. Scale with equal radius.
  2. Radius can be calculated by percent.
  3. Radius can be controlled by media queries.

If solution is javascript, I still need to emulate media query triggers. I dont 'need' media queries but I do want the ability to control the radius by percentage at certain widths:

@media (max-width : 320px) 
{
    .x2{padding: 50%;}
}

@media (min-width : 321px) and (max-width : 800px)
{
    .x2{padding: 25%;}
}

@media (min-width: 801px)
{
    .x2{padding: 12.5%;}
}

Here is what I have so far:

http://jsfiddle.net/QmPhb/

<div class="x1">
    <div class="x2">
        lol dude      
    </div>
    <div class="x2"></div>
    <div class="x2"></div>
    <div class="x2"></div>
</div>

.x1
{
    float:left;
    width:100%;
}

.x2
{
    display:block;
    float:left;
    padding: 12.5%;          //Currently being used to control radius.
    width:auto;
    height:auto;
    border-radius:50%;
    -moz-border-radius:50%;
    -webkit-border-radius:50%;
    -khtml-border-radius: 50%;
    background:#eee;
    text-align:center;
}

Problems:

In this solution, when content is added to a circle:

  • The shape contorts when scaled past it's available padding.
  • Increases the size of the radius.

Update:

I've built a working solution for this here: Responsive CSS Circles

share|improve this question
    
The problems you listed are caused by width: auto; height: auto;. Are fixed dimensions acceptable? Maybe with relative units? –  bfavaretto Oct 18 '12 at 1:46
    
It's going to be hard to have it work with CSS only, being that the width and height need to be the same, and since it's responsive, you won't be able to tell. –  coopersita Oct 18 '12 at 1:48
    
@bfavaretto The need is really so that the radius or diameter could be calculated by percent similar to the example. –  Dan Kanze Oct 18 '12 at 1:50
    
@coopersita I am not against using javascript, but we still need to keep media query triggers in mind. –  Dan Kanze Oct 18 '12 at 1:50
1  
@PraveenKumar I dont 'need' them haha but I do want the ability to control the radius by percentage at certain widths. Even if the solution uses javascript. –  Dan Kanze Oct 18 '12 at 2:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Solution:

http://jsfiddle.net/WTWrB/

The DIV structure:

We use overflow:hidden in .x2 for spill off background colors in .x3 of child elements.

Notice the content starts inside of .x3

<div class="x0">
    <div class="x1">
        <div class="x2">
            <div class="x3">
                <!-- BEG Content -->
                <div class="x4">
                    dude
                </div>
                <div class="x6">
                    <div class="x7">
                        dude
                    </div>
                    <div class="x8">
                        dude
                    </div>
                </div>                
                <div class="x5">
                    dude
                </div>
                <!-- END Content -->
            </div>
        </div>
        <div class="x2"></div>
        <div class="x2"></div>
        <div class="x2"></div>
    </div>
</div>

The CSS:

@media (max-width: 320px)
{
    .x2 {padding: 50%;}
}

@media (min-width: 321px) and (max-width: 800px)
{
    .x2 {padding: 25%;}
}

@media (min-width: 801px)
{
    .x1 {width:800px}
    .x2 {padding: 12.5%;}
}
.x0 {
    float:left;
    width:100%;
}
.x1 {
    margin:0px auto;
}
.x2 {
    overflow:hidden;
    display:block;
    float:left;
    width:auto;
    height:auto;
    position: relative;
    border-radius:50%;
    -moz-border-radius:50%;
    -webkit-border-radius:50%;
    -khtml-border-radius: 50%;
    background:#eee;
}
.x3 {
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    left: 0;
    top:0;
    font-size: 100%;
    float:left;
    height:100%;
    background-color:red;
}
/* BEG Content */
.x3 div{float:left;}
.x4,.x5,.x6 {
    width:100%;
}
.x7,.x8 {
    width:50%;
    float:left;
    height:100%;
}
.x4,.x5,.x7,.x8 {
    text-align:center;
}
.x4 {
    background-color:blue;
    height:20%;
}
.x5 {
    background-color:yellow;
    height:20%;
}
.x6 {
    height:60%;
}
.x7 {
    background-color:green;
}
.x8 {
    background-color:orange;
}
/* END Content */

Responsive CSS Circles

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for nice design, elegant solution –  2sb May 8 '13 at 13:46

I know this solution differs quite a bit from what has been suggested here but I still thought it would be worth putting it up.

I used an image as a mask to create the circle and took advantage of the fact that when padding is specified as a percentage it is calculated based on the width of its parent element rather than the height. This enabled me to create a perfect square.

Demonstration of circles proportionally resizing here

HTML code

<div class="container">
    <img class="circle" src="circleImage.png">
</div>

CSS code

.container {
    position: relative;
    float: left;
    width: 50%;
    height: 0;
    padding-bottom: 50%;
    background-color: #bbb;

}

.circle { 
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    height: auto;
    z-index: 1;
}

@media (max-width: 320px) {
    .container { width: 100%; padding-bottom: 100%; }
}

@media (min-width: 321px) and (max-width: 800px) {
    .container { width: 50%; padding-bottom: 50%; }
}

@media (min-width: 801px) {
    .container { width: 25%; padding-bottom: 25%; }
}

Demonstration of the above circles sub-divided into sections as per your question here

share|improve this answer
    
how about the box-shadow property with this solution? –  Arvind K. Jan 20 at 5:59

Shorter Code

This solution reduces your code size but keeps the functionality in place. I've kept the original .x#, eliminating the .x0, .x3, and .x6 that were not needed. So in a final solution, you would probably renumber (but I wanted you to see what was eliminated).

Any of your pieces "splitting" the circle that require a different top or left setting will need to have a selector that meets or exceeds the .x2 > div selector to override, hence why I have .x2 > .x7 etc. for some of my selectors.

(As noted in the comments below, Chrome has bug issues with the original technique the OP had posted at the time of the bounty starting. This does not solve those, so view the following in another browser.)

Here's the modified fiddle.

HTML

<div class="x1">
        <div class="x2">
                <!-- BEG Content -->
                <div class="x4">
                    dude
                </div>
                <div class="x7">
                    dude
                </div>
                <div class="x8">
                    dude
                </div>
                <div class="x5">
                    dude
                </div>
                <!-- END Content -->
        </div>
        <div class="x2"></div>
        <div class="x2"></div>
        <div class="x2"></div>
    </div>

CSS

.x1 {
    margin:0px auto;
}
.x2 {
    overflow:hidden;
    display:block;
    float:left;
    width:auto;
    height:auto;
    position: relative;
    border-radius:50%;
    -moz-border-radius:50%;
    -webkit-border-radius:50%;
    -khtml-border-radius: 50%;
    background:#eee;
}

/* BEG Content */
.x2 > div {
    position: absolute;
    text-align: center;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
}
.x4,.x5 {
    width:100%;
    height: 20%;
}
.x2 > .x7, .x2 > .x8 {
    width:50%;
    height: 60%;
    top: 20%;
}
.x4 {
    background-color:blue;
}
.x2 > .x5 {
    background-color:yellow;
    top: 80%;
}

.x7 {
    background-color:green;
}
.x2 > .x8 {
    background-color:orange;
    left: 50%;
}
/* END Content */
@media (max-width: 320px)
{
    .x2 {padding: 50%;}
}

@media (min-width: 321px) and (max-width: 800px)
{
    .x2 {padding: 25%;}
}

@media (min-width: 801px)
{
    .x1 {width:800px}
    .x2 {padding: 12.5%;}
}

EDIT: Based on comments, it appears the OP desired something more like the control this fiddle offers (not functional in Chrome; the OP has not at the time of this edit replied for me to know if that is the type of functionality desired or not).

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh yea I didnt say that correctly. .x2 divs are stacking fine. You have also eliminated .x3...which is great. What I meant is that using overrides to apply styles in .x2 child elements is undesirable. –  Dan Kanze Oct 23 '12 at 20:17
    
@DanKanze--how much flexibility versus standardization do you want in the "layouts" inside these circles? Are they all the same? Each one different? Your goal is "improved" and "smaller". Well, I got the code smaller, but what is "improved"? That depends a lot on what functionality you want. –  ScottS Oct 23 '12 at 23:27
    
From a developer point of view an ideal solution would be one that easy to build (rolling out styles inside of .x2 blocks without overrides) and optimizes arbitrary code (trim fat like .x3 only used as a helper class to accomadate the build flexibility in .x2). An ideal solution would be a single class that enabled a developer too use .x2 like a block as well as contain them. –  Dan Kanze Oct 23 '12 at 23:55
    
@DanKanze--have you looked at your original fiddle solution in Chrome? It fails to hide the overflow because of the bug noted in this question. –  ScottS Oct 24 '12 at 2:49
    
@DanKanze--Here is a fiddle (look at in Firefox or IE9+, see comment above) that controls things by a layout class on the content wrapper. Is that more what you are talking about? It is certainly not necessarily "smaller" in size, but the layout class can be coded by the developer and the class applied by the user. –  ScottS Oct 24 '12 at 2:55

You don't need @media queries for this. This is my try, pure CSS:

.x1 {
    overflow:hidden;
}
.x1 .x2 {
    display:block;
    float:left;
    padding: 12.5%;
    width:auto;
    height:auto;
    border-radius:50%;
    -moz-border-radius:50%;
    -webkit-border-radius:50%;
    -khtml-border-radius: 50%;
    background:#eee;
    text-align:center;
    position: relative;
}
.x1 .x2 span {
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    left: 0;
    top: 48%;
    line-height: 1em;
    height: 1em;
    font-size: 100%;
    overflow: hidden;
}​

Fiddle

Full Screen

share|improve this answer
    
This certainly addresses the overflow problem. I guess I would expect the Circles to stack @ 25% padding (2 rows) and 50% padding (4 rows) though. Is that possible with this solution? –  Dan Kanze Oct 18 '12 at 2:18
    
Yeah, for that to be possible, we need to use media queries then! :) –  Praveen Kumar Oct 18 '12 at 2:26
    
Hopefully this gives better context for the kind of flexibility I need. jsfiddle.net/tgXKK –  Dan Kanze Oct 18 '12 at 2:57
2  
I made several revisions to this code and minified it the best I could. There were a couple properties I added to allow for more flexibility in child content container elements. See edits above. –  Dan Kanze Oct 21 '12 at 4:31
1  
Your solution really only solved half the problem. even though it received a lot of attention does not mean when people try to use this outside the jsfiddle it will actually be portable. I asked you several times to revise your answer to accommodate the bounty and you never modified. –  Dan Kanze Nov 1 '12 at 4:41

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