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I am trying to find duplicate words in a string array.

Here is my code for the comparison:

   for ( int j = 0 ; j < wordCount ; j++)
   {    
       for (int i = wordCount-1 ; i > j ; i--)
       {       
           if (stringArray[i].compareTo(stringArray[j]) == 0 && i!=j)
           {
               //duplicate
               duplicates++;
           }
       }
   }
   wordCount -= duplicates;
   System.out.print("\nNumber of words, not including duplicates: " + wordCount);

in the if statement, it says NullPointerException. What does this mean? Is there a better way to do this? I tried simply doing

if (stringArray[i] == stringArray[j] && i!=j)

but that kept giving me wrong answers.

share|improve this question
    
what is in string array? –  r0ast3d Oct 18 '12 at 4:59

4 Answers 4

You can do like this for beter performance:

public int getDuplicateCount(Integer[] arr){
     int count = 0;   
     Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();
     for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
         if (set.contains(arr[i]))
             count++;
         set.add(arr[i]);
      }
      return count;
 }
share|improve this answer

NullPointerException means that one of your array members is not set (i.e. it is null)

Don't use == to compare strings.

You are on the right track - chances are stringArray[] contains some members that are not set. Eacy fix is to null check before using the values.

for ( int j = 0 ; j < wordCount ; j++)
   {    
       for (int i = wordCount-1 ; i > j ; i--)
       {       
           String wordi = stringArray[i];
           String wordj = strinArray[j];
           // If both are null it won't count as a duplicate.
           // (No real need to check wordj - I do it out of habit)
           if (wordi != null && wordj != null && wordi.compareTo(wordj) == 0 && i!=j)
           {
               //duplicate
               duplicates++;
           }
       }
   }
   wordCount -= duplicates;
   System.out.print("\nNumber of words, not including duplicates: " + wordCount);
share|improve this answer
    
how do you null check? –  Katherine Oct 18 '12 at 4:48

It means stringArray[i] is null, i.e. your array has a null entry in it somewhere. It's possible that you have a logic error elsewhere and some elements of the array are not being set correctly.

If your array legitimately contains nulls, you have to explicitly check for this before trying to call methods on stringArray[i]:

if (stringArray[i] == null){
    // Do whatever
} else if (stringArray[i].compareTo(stringArray[j]) == 0 && i!=j) {
    //duplicate
    duplicates++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but if it is null, how do i escape a for loop? –  Katherine Oct 18 '12 at 4:55
    
why does my array have nulls? here is the code i used to set the string array: String[] stringArray = new String[wordCount]; while (!line.equals("DONE")) { for ( int k = 0 ; k < wordCount ; k++) { //put tokens into string array StringTokenizer tokens = new StringTokenizer(line); stringArray[k] = tokens.nextToken(); } } –  Katherine Oct 18 '12 at 4:59
    
@Katherine I guess because line is initially "DONE" so your initialising loop never executes? Also, if line is anything other than "DONE" that loop will run forever since line is not updated in the loop body, and you should just use String.split("\\s") instead of StringTokenizer. –  verdesmarald Oct 18 '12 at 6:09

Null pointer may be because you have any null value in your array.

Your code is not working because you are itrating on same array on which you need to find duplicates

you can use following code to count duplicate words in array.

public class WordCount {


public static void main(String args[]){
    String stringArray[]={"a","b","c","a","d","b","e","f"};

    Set<String> mySet = new HashSet<String>(Arrays.asList(stringArray));

    System.out.println("Number of duplicate words: "+ (stringArray.length -mySet.size()));

    System.out.println("Number of words, not including duplicates: "+ mySet.size());
}

}
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