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I'm trying to make sense of a puzzling behavior with git union merge. To repro, start with a hello.txt that has:

1
2
3

In another commit, add a line, e.g.

1
2
new
3

In a different foo branch off of the original commit, delete the middle line:

1
3

Here I would expect the merge to not contain the deleted line, even when using union merge. Yet I see it contain (after running git merge foo while on master.):

1
2
new
3

So it's ignoring my line deletion. Am I just misunderstanding how union merge works? Sample repo here: https://github.com/davidebbo/MergeTest

One more note: if instead of deleting line 2, you delete line 1, then the merge happens as expected, ending up with:

2
new
3

So the weirdness only seems to occur in scenarios that would cause conflicts under standard (non-union) merge.

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What full command did you use to do the merge? git-union-merge is not designed to handle deletions, really, it's mostly meant for things like log files - all it does is throw together any and all lines it sees, in a relatively reasonable ordering. –  Amber Oct 18 '12 at 5:06
    
@Amber Sorry, just added that in the question. –  David Ebbo Oct 18 '12 at 5:09
    
The strange thing is, without "merge=union", the inevitable conflict actually shows the right thing: one side has "2" and "new", and the other side has neither. The doc description of union implies that it only affects the way "add"s are handled. There should be no merge problems with "delete"s. Truly puzzling behavior. –  Brad Wilson Oct 18 '12 at 5:10
    
So are you saying that the behavior when dealing with deletions is mostly unpredictable, and that it's simply something that shouldn't be done? Note that in some cases, removed lines remain deleted. –  David Ebbo Oct 18 '12 at 5:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The --union merge is working just as it should. See the git-merge-file man page:

Instead of leaving conflicts in the file, resolve conflicts favouring both side of the lines.

The the second scenario does not count as a conflict at all. The modified lines are not adjacent (#1 and #3).

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Yes, I think you're right. It could be argued that the deleted line is not really causing a conflict, since the line is unambiguously gone. But it's probably just not smart enough to figure this out. I'll mark this as answer tomorrow if nothing else earth shattering is brought up :) –  David Ebbo Oct 18 '12 at 7:07

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