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Are pointers to pointers legal in c++? I've come across this SO question: Pointer to Pointer to Pointer

But the answers aren't clear if it is legal c++ or not. Let's say I have:

class A{
public:
    void foo(){
        /* ect */
    }
};

class B{
public:
    A* a;
    /* ect */
};

void Some_Func() {
    B *b;

    // besides this looking ugly, is it legal c++?
    b->a->foo();
};

Is the line b->a->foo() OK to write? Is there a better way to represent this expression?

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1  
Apart from the fact that foo and a are private in each of their classes (you'd have to make them public for this to work), why should it not be ok? It's not even particularly ugly, actually. –  jogojapan Oct 18 '12 at 5:51
1  
Why wouldn't it be? Pointers are a type, just like any other. –  chris Oct 18 '12 at 5:52
1  
They are perfectly ok, but you cannot access 'a' from 'b' (b->a) directly as a is private member of class B. Otherwise it should work. –  Skandh Oct 18 '12 at 5:53
2  
What you have here is not a pointer to a pointer. It is a pointer to an object that has a pointer member. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 18 '12 at 5:56
    
They should be public.... I made the changes. –  markoh Oct 18 '12 at 6:05
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is perfectly valid.But the term you are using "pointer to pointer" is wrong.

the term means a double pointer like **P,a pointer which holds the address of another pointer.

but your case is the pointer(of class A) is an member of a class whose pointer(of class B) is created by you in some_func

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1  
"b" is a pointer of class B, which holds a pointer to class A. –  Aniket Oct 18 '12 at 5:58
    
Thanks for correcting my use of the term 'pointer to a pointer'. –  markoh Oct 18 '12 at 21:51
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Illegal, "a" is private. So is "foo".

If corrected to "public" then they're legal constructs.

From your code its hard to find a "better" way. BUT You can modify the code to make the code look much clearer:

class A{
public:
    void foo(){ cout << "Work";}
};

class B{
private:
    A *a;
public:
    A& getA(){
       return *a;
    }
};

void SomeFunction()
{
    B *b = new B();
    B& bRef = *b;
    bRef.getA().foo(); //better looking code? 
        delete b;
}
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if someone down-votes. Care to mention why. Thanks! –  Aniket Oct 18 '12 at 6:04
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It is legal but in your example your program will crash (if you could compile it since your members are private) because you did not create an instance of B

void Some_Func() {
    B *b;  // uninitialized B ptr  should be   B* b = new B;

    // legal
    b->a->foo();
};

Although you may want to reconsider accessing variables directly as you do and instead have getter/setters to access private member variables.

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Yes but then you have to use pointer to pointer like **P.
Actually if we want to access a pointer which is holding another pointer then we can do this.This is allowed in c++ but keep in mind that only in case if you have assigned a pointer to pointer p

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What do you mean "only in case of public"? What you describe in the answer is a pointer to pointer, but for that you don't need the class A and class B construction originally proposed by the questioner. –  jogojapan Oct 18 '12 at 6:04
    
but i have mentioned that if we assign them then this line must be true b->a->foo() –  khan Oct 18 '12 at 6:08
    
If you are still talking about the original example, you need a pointer A **a (not sure what you mean by P in that case), and the way you call foo is (**a).foo() or (*a)->foo() then. –  jogojapan Oct 18 '12 at 6:13
    
ok em sorry about that .. i have to write **a .. –  khan Oct 18 '12 at 6:14
    
No, I mean, of course you call the variable p, but for a start, in your text you have uppercase P and lowercase p, while in the comment you talked about b->a->foo()... –  jogojapan Oct 18 '12 at 6:16
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