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I am just in the midst of deploying some code to production, which is an upgrade of a system from SQL 2000 to SQL 2008.

I'm having a mysterious problem in one of my stored procedures that fetches some data from the database, then creates some files via bcp (successfull), then it tries to execute a couple of move commands, and they both fail even though the folders definitely exist and the service is running as sysadmin.

This is the code it is trying to execute:

set @cmd_string = 'move '+ @OutPath_AllCards + '*.* '+ @ArchivePath_AllCards
delete from @tbl_xp_cmdshell_output
Insert @tbl_xp_cmdshell_output exec @error_temp = master.dbo.xp_cmdshell @cmd_string

and this is the error message that I get back

xp_cmdshell Error Executing "move H:\Transfer\CHAD\Outbound\AllCards\*.* H:\Transfer\CHAD\Outbound\AllCards\Archive\" 

The Returned command line error is

"The filename, directory name, or volume label syntax is incorrect."

This works fine in the identically setup UAT version of the database

Any suggestions?

Update:

I can reproduce the error if there are no files in the source directory. I think there probably should be files in the source directory, but I wonder if there is a lag before they are created by bcp , and when it goes to execute the move they don't exist yet? Any ideas?

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You are missing a " at the end. Also, are you aware of the massive security holes in a) using xp_cmdshell and b) running the service account with sysadmin rights? I emplore you to revisit your strategy! –  Pete Carter Oct 18 '12 at 6:05
    
I don't think the problem is a missing quote, you'll see a second one lower down in the output, and that may just be a result of the error is parsed out of the results table. I'm aware of the dangers of xp_cmdshell of course, but needs must sometimes –  jazza1000 Oct 18 '12 at 6:12
    
Sorry, I can't seem to edit my question, so I will put this in as a comment - I can reproduce the error if there are no files in the source directory. I think there probably should be files in the source directory, but I wonder if there is a lag before they are created by bcp , and when it goes to execute the move they don't exist yet? Any ideas? –  jazza1000 Oct 18 '12 at 6:19
    
@jazza1000 updated your question for you –  pleinolijf Oct 18 '12 at 8:07

2 Answers 2

OK, a little bit of stupid programmer (me and others) syndrome here.

The error occurs because when you execute the statement move c:\Source*.* c:\dest and there are no files in source then the error I encountered will return ("The filename, directory name, or volume label syntax is incorrect.").

The code is presuming that the files from the previous run exist, and hence moves them out of the way before bcping new ones. The bcp doesn't happen first as I previously thought.

On the first run of the job the files from the previous run didn't exist, so we got the error.

So, I guess the solution will be to do a copy and then delete in the folder rather than trying to do it as a move.

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Please note that if you call external OS command from the database server (SQL Server in your case), then the local computer is that database server, not necessarily your local computer.

As you mentioned H: drive in your specific example, I assume this is a network mapped drive (possibly, the one with users home folders). However, you might be in the situation that this mapping exists on UAT database server, but not on the PROD one. It is not uncommon when DEV or UAT server is located on someone's local machine, and when the software gets moved to the next stage of deployment, things start going strangely wrong.

In your case it would be much safer to use UNC paths (with leading double-backslash) instead of DOS-like ones. This will give you independence on drive mappings anywhere.

However, I personally do not like to embed OS calls into database engine - it produces a mess. I prefer to have a shell script (UNIX) or command script (Windows) where I call a stored procedure (via isql or osql or sqlplus), then run other executables. With BCP I don't see any benefit of running it from stored procedure - you still cannot use local temporary tables, because BCP opens its own connection.

Also, I frequently see source code where people do not care to check whether the operation was successful or not. With BCP it takes quite an effort to verify whether it succeeded or not (it always returns 0 - success, and the same story with isql, osql, sqlplus, etc.). You have to check error file and ensure it is empty to decide it was fine. All these things are not suitable for stored procedures. Of course, you can launch another executable for checks, but in my opinion, this is not he right way. Database servers are supposed for database operations, not for running applications in full.

If you still do not want to abandon xp_cmdshell, my advice would be to create your own stored procedure as generic wrapper around that. In case you decide to change database provider you will migrate with much less pain.

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