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> system.time(expand.grid(1:1000,1:10000))
   user  system elapsed 
   1.65    0.34    2.03 
> system.time(CJ(1:1000,1:10000))
   user  system elapsed 
   3.48    0.32    3.79 
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3  
Perhaps because it sets the key on the resulting data.table –  mnel Oct 18 '12 at 6:51
    
good point. I'll answer my own question. –  Michael Oct 18 '12 at 7:00
1  
CJ could be faster when it's passed sorted vectors, though. Thanks for highlighting. Have now filed FR#2321 CJ speedup by not setting key naively. –  Matt Dowle Oct 18 '12 at 10:15
1  
@Michael, I guess the best answer is my update that this has been fixed. It would be really nice if you could change that so that future users will not misunderstand this for not being fixed. Thank you. –  Arun Oct 20 '13 at 8:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Thanks for reporting this. This has been fixed now in data.table 1.8.9. Here's the timing test with the latest commit (913):

system.time(expand.grid(1:1000,1:10000))
# user system elapsed
# 1.420 0.552 1.987

system.time(CJ(1:1000,1:10000))
# user system elapsed
# 0.080 0.092 0.171

From NEWS :

CJ() is 90% faster on 1e6 rows (for example), #4849. The inputs are now sorted first before combining rather than after combining and uses rep.int instead of rep (thanks to Sean Garborg for the ideas, code and benchmark) and only sorted if is.unsorted(), #2321.

Also check out NEWS for other notable features that have made it in and bug fixes; e.g., CJ() gains a new sorted argument too.

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Mnel's guess is right. CJ returns a data.table where each column is a key.

> DT <- CJ(1:100,1:100)
> key(DT)
[1] "V1" "V2"

A fairer comparison:

> system.time(CJ(1:1000,1:10000))
   user  system elapsed 
   3.40    0.25    3.73 
> system.time(data.table(expand.grid(1:1000,1:10000),key=c("Var1","Var2")))
   user  system elapsed 
   4.14    0.68    4.90 
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2  
+1 Will improve CJ even so; link to FR in comment on question. Btw, as.data.table should be faster than data.table. –  Matt Dowle Oct 18 '12 at 10:21
    
To be fair, the difference you are seeing in the second line is from data.table() overhead. If you check out Matthew's suggestion, you will see that expand.grid, even after converting to data.table is still about twice as fast –  Ricardo Saporta Jul 30 '13 at 19:48
    
Isn't there no key with as.data.table()? –  Señor O Sep 3 '13 at 18:12

The real reason it's slow is that it's not focused on the default use of CJ: when the argument vectors satisfy anyDuplicated(vector) == F.

Maybe others use CJ differently, but for unique vectors, there's room for improvement:

Speed Comparison

Unit: milliseconds
                  expr        min         lq     median         uq        max neval
    dt1 <- CJ(a, b, c) 2394.38929 2434.75660 2439.14362 2444.66607 2686.41990   100
dt2 <- fastCJ(a, b, c)   18.83701   25.33339   25.51254   25.70966   27.60622   100
Output identical: TRUE

Code

library(microbenchmark)
library(data.table)

repTE <- function(x, times, each) {
  rep.int(rep.int(x, times=rep.int(each, times=length(x))), times=times)
}
fastCJ <- function(...) {
  l <- lapply(list(...), sort.int, method="quick")
  seq_ct <- length(l)
  if (seq_ct > 1) {
    seq_lens <- vapply(l, length, numeric(1))
    tot_len <- prod(seq_lens)

    l <-lapply(
      seq_len(seq_ct),
      function(i) {
        if (i==1) {
          len <- seq_lens[1]
          rep.int(l[[1]], times=rep.int(tot_len/len, len))
        } else if (i < seq_ct) {
          pre_len <- prod(seq_lens[1:(i - 1)])
          repTE(l[[i]], times=pre_len, each=tot_len/pre_len/seq_lens[i])
        } else {
          rep.int(l[[seq_ct]], times=tot_len/seq_lens[seq_ct])
        }
      }
    )    
  } else {
    tot_len <- length(l[[1]])
  }

  setattr(l, "row.names", .set_row_names(tot_len))
  setattr(l, "class", c("data.table", "data.frame"))
  if (is.null(names <- names(seq_list))) {
    names <- vector("character", seq_ct)
  }
  if (any(tt <- names == "")) {
    names[tt] <- paste0("V", which(tt))
  }
  setattr(l, "names", names)
  data.table:::settruelength(l, 0L)
  l <- alloc.col(l)
  setattr(l, "sorted", names(l))

  return(l)
}

a <- factor(sample(1:1000, 1000))
b <- sample(letters, 26)
c <- runif(100)
print(microbenchmark( dt1 <- CJ(a, b, c), dt2 <- fastCJ(a, b, c)))
cat("Output identical:", identical(dt1, dt2))
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1  
Error in fastCJ(a, b, c) : object 'seq_list' not found –  Ferdinand.kraft Aug 30 '13 at 23:07
    
A cleaned up version (spearheaded by @Arun) has replaced 'CJ' in data.table on R-Forge, so I'd go there, or wait for it. Feature request: #4849; Faster CJ –  SeanG Sep 1 '13 at 21:49

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