Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have a large number of websites which need to implement cross domain login, ie. If someone is logged in to site X with the credentials, he should automatically login to the site A or B when the user navigates to site A or B.

Also, we want to give a common UI/Javascript, which all the sites can put on their HTML file, and which will internally call a common API and which will somehow log the user in the site A or B.

Its is similar to what Facebook has. If one logs on to facebook, and goes to a site, he will automatically be logged in, if he has given the permissions for that site.

Also, the same facebook UI is present on every site which has the facebook social plugin, and the site including the facebook plugin does not have to make any call to facebook from its own server(i guess that call is made from the browser).

I saw that a call to facebook includes an API key which is used by that app, but since the API key is visible, it is no longer a secret. How does FB prevent random DOS attacks to its servers by the same API key, and if the user changes his IP address at random?

Lets say we try to implement similar of all the websites A, B which are associated with X, since the API key is exposed(just like in case of FB), how can i stop a different rogue site, say ABC.com from using the same API key, and acting as if it was part of the network.

I guess since the call is from the browser, and from a javascript, the API key is always exposed. Does the call always have to be from the server so that the API key is kept a secret?

In my case, how can the UIs of various networked websites like A, B etc pass something to the server of X, so that the server X can identify that the call is indeed coming from a reliable source and is not impersonated?

Thank you

Tuco

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I saw that a call to facebook includes an API key which is used by that app, but since the API key is visible, it is no longer a secret.

No one ever said it was.

How does FB prevent random DOS attacks to its servers by the same API key, and if the user changes his IP address at random?

For certain actions, f.e. login, apps are tied to certain domains set up in the app settings. If my app allows user logins through Facebook from example.com, logins will not work if example.net takes my app id and tries to have users connect to it from their domain.

I guess since the call is from the browser, and from a javascript, the API key is always exposed. Does the call always have to be from the server so that the API key is kept a secret?

Calls using the app secret should always be made server-side only.

In my case, how can the UIs of various networked websites like A, B etc pass something to the server of X, so that the server X can identify that the call is indeed coming from a reliable source and is not impersonated?

The Facebook JS SDK checks for example which domain it is currently running on.

Since that’s client side and could be manipulated, there’s other security measures in place as well. F.e., Facebook will only redirect a client to addresses under a certain domain, and in server-side communication gives you a signed_request which can be verified using your app secret.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the answer did help in clearing up a bit. –  Tuco Oct 19 '12 at 6:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.