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I have a large loop that generates data. Each iteration takes, say, 1 second and produces a chunk of data. I need all chunks written into the file in the correct order.

If I just wanted to parallelize the loop, I could write something like this (highly simplified):

    FILE* f = fopen("output.txt", "w");
    omp_lock_t lock;
    omp_init_lock(&lock);
    int nIterations = 1000000;
#pragma omp parallel for
    for(int thread=0; thread<4; thread++)
    {
        int a=0, b=0, c=0;
        for(int n=thread; n<nIterations; n+=4)
        {
            int value = do_computations(&a, &b, &c);
            omp_set_lock(&lock);
            fprintf(f, "%d\n", value);
            omp_unset_lock(&lock);
        }
    }
#pragma omp barrier
    fclose(f);
    omp_destroy_lock(&lock);

This gets my output into the file, but the order of entries would not be guaranteed.

I want to synchronize execution so that all threads do their tasks, then the master thread writes into the file, and then threads resume. In other words, I'd like something like this:

    #pragma omp parallel for
        for(int thread=0; thread<4; thread++)
        {
            int a=0, b=0, c=0;
            int values[4];
            for(int n=thread; n<nIterations; n+=4)
            {
                values[n] = do_computations(&a, &b, &c);
#pragma omp barrier
                if(thread == 0)
                {
                      for(int i=0; i<4; i++)
                        fprintf(f, "%d\n", values[i]);
                }
#pragma omp barrier
            }
        }
#pragma omp barrier

Except, for some inexplicable reason, this is prohibited by the OpenMP specification.

Or I could try

    #pragma omp parallel for
        for(int thread=0; thread<4; thread++)
        {
            int a=0, b=0, c=0;
            for(int n=thread; n<nIterations; n+=4)
            {
                int value = do_computations(&a, &b, &c);
#pragma omp ordered
                {
                    fprintf(f, "%d\n", value);
                }
            }
        }
    #pragma omp barrier
        fclose(f);

But that won't work either, because "An iteration of a loop with a for construct ... must not execute more than one ordered directive."

I don't want to rewrite the code as a single loop and I don't want to exchange loops.

Is there a clean way to do this with OpenMP, without other threading/synchronization tools?

share|improve this question
    
What is the architecture / operating system you are running your code on ? –  Raj Oct 18 '12 at 8:39
    
Can you try to use #pragma omp parallel instead of parallel for –  Raj Oct 18 '12 at 8:53
    
Is do_computations really passed three 0s? I assume do_computations is not a pure function (i.e. it has side effects). If so, then what are the side effects of do_computations? What happens when two calls to do_computations are executed in parallel? I highly doubt that you can even get away with executing them in parallel (based on the assumption that there are side effects, and therefore the order in which the executions occur matters). -- Or are you oversimplifying the code? Maybe you should share something that better represents your real loop? –  ArjunShankar Oct 18 '12 at 10:37
    
Also, at a glance, it appears to me you have written code with the assumption that the outer for will always be split amongst exactly four threads. I even feel that maybe you don't even really need the outer for (you seem to be wanting to use it as a way to split the inner for amongst four threads) –  ArjunShankar Oct 18 '12 at 10:41
    
Yes, the outer for is used only as a device to split the execution into 4 threads. Each has its own copies of a, b, and c, which would be modified by do_computations. –  user434507 Oct 24 '12 at 6:15

2 Answers 2

You're trying to do two things - a computation and IO. The computation can be parallelized, but the IO must necessarily be serial. But by putting the IO in the same loop as the computation, you're forcing serialization on the computation as well, which makes no sense.

You'd be much better off doing all the computation, then doing the IO. This will almost certainly be faster even in serial, especially if you can write the data out in binary in one big chunk rather than with a loop over fprintfs.

    FILE* f = fopen("output.txt", "w");
    const int nIterations = 1000000;
    int values[nIterations];

#pragma omp parallel for 
    for(int n=0; n<niterations; n++)
    {
        int a=0, b=0, c=0;
        values[n] = do_computations(&a, &b, &c);
    }

    for (int n=0; n<niterations; n++)
         fprintf(f,"%d\n", values[n]);

    fclose(f);

This requires more memory, of course, but then speed vs memory is a common trade-off. If the extremes of that tradeoff don't work, you can always do the computation in adjustable-sized chunks:

    const int nIterations = 1000000;
    const int chunkSize   = 10000;
    int values[chunkSize];
    int chunkNum = 0;
    int chunkLeft = chunkSize;

    for (int start = 0; start < nIterations; start+= chunkSize) {

        if (start+chunkSize > nIterations) chunkLeft = nIterations - start;

    #pragma omp parallel for 
        for(int n=start; n<start+chunkLeft; n++)
        {
            int a=0, b=0, c=0;
            values[n-start] = do_computations(&a, &b, &c);
        }

        for (int n=0; n<chunkLeft; n++)
             fprintf(f,"%d\n", values[n]);

    }
    fclose(f);
share|improve this answer
    
We're talking about the situation where it's necessary to overlap computations and I/O. Sure, it is usually easier to do one then another. Until you have 12 hours worth of computations wiped out because there was a power glitch and all results were being buffered in the RAM waiting for the loop to complete. –  user434507 Oct 24 '12 at 6:18
    
That's great, but you're not overlapping communications and computation, you're just serializing your computation, as even a cursory profiling would demonstrate. If you want to overlap the two, create a separate IO task and use a producer/consumer approach to buffer the output. –  Jonathan Dursi Oct 24 '12 at 12:44
    
I'm not serializing computation, I/O takes 0.01% of the time, the rest of the time threads run in parallel. You're overthinking this. What I wrote in the original question is exactly what I need. –  user434507 Oct 24 '12 at 19:37
    
Awesome. So the code with the chunking, with chunk size equal to the disk i/o buffer size, should be exactly what you need. –  Jonathan Dursi Oct 25 '12 at 1:04

I'll try to propose a solution not already present in former answers:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define NITER 100

int main() {

  FILE * f = fopen("output.bin", "w+");

#pragma omp parallel
  {
#pragma omp for schedule(runtime)
    for (int ii = 0; ii < NITER; ++ii) {    
      sleep(1); // Simulate computation
      printf("%d\n",ii); // Just to be convinced that the loop is not evaluated in serial order
#pragma omp critical (FILEWRITE)
      {
    fseek (f  ,sizeof(ii)*ii,SEEK_SET);
    fwrite(&ii,sizeof(ii),1,f);
      }      
    }
  }

  // Check serially that the file is written in the right order
  fseek(f,0,SEEK_SET);
  int value = -1;
  for (int ii = 0; ii < NITER; ++ii) {        
    fread (&value,sizeof(ii),1,f);    
    assert( value == ii );
  }  

  fclose(f);
  return 0;
}

This case applies only if each chunk has a very well defined size so that, knowing which iterate you are computing, you can derive its offset from the beginning of the file.

That said, in the code snippets you are providing there are many errors which suggest that you must review the basics of OpenMP. For instance:

#pragma omp parallel for
    for(int thread=0; thread<4; thread++)
    { // No need to unroll the loop as OpenMP runtime 
      // map iterations on threads based on the scheduling policy
        int a=0, b=0, c=0;
        for(int n=thread; n<nIterations; n+=4)
        {
            int value = do_computations(&a, &b, &c);
            // No need to use lock, when a critical construct suffices
            omp_set_lock(&lock); 
            fprintf(f, "%d\n", value);
            omp_unset_lock(&lock);
        }
    } // Implicit barrier at the end of the parallel for
#pragma omp barrier 
// Why a barrier when there is only one thread?
share|improve this answer
    
Is there an advantage of critical over the lock? Critical gives a bit shorter code, but both options should work in identical fashion. –  user434507 Oct 24 '12 at 6:24
    
@user434507 The big difference is in using fseek to avoid the worksharing construct to be declared ordered (which, based on my experience, may produce a big slowdown). Other than that, using #pragma omp critical avoid an unnecessary dependency on omp.h so that if you want to compile a serial version of the binary you don't have to fill your sources with #ifdef _OPENMP. –  Massimiliano Oct 24 '12 at 6:39
    
Yes, it's an interesting approach, unfortunately, does not help if I don't know the chunk size beforehand. In Windows, you have to include omp.h anyway or you get linker errors. –  user434507 Oct 24 '12 at 6:43

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