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Simple C question, how can I correctly and succintly convert milliseconds to seconds. There are two constraints:

  • I've no floating point support in this tiny subset-of-C compiler
  • I need the seconds rounded to the nearest second(1-499ms rounds down,500-999ms rounds up. Don't need to care about negative values)

    int mseconds = 1600; // should be converted to 2 seconds
    int msec = 23487;  // should be converted to 23 seconds
    
share|improve this question
    
How would you want 1500 and 2500 to round (hint: Some other languages let you choose the algorithm msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.midpointrounding.aspx) – Rowland Shaw Aug 18 '09 at 16:17
up vote 24 down vote accepted

This should work

int sec = ((msec + 500) / 1000);
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That is the cleanest way. I usually do that when I have more then 1.6 seconds to think about it ;-) – Guss Aug 18 '09 at 16:14
3  
This assumes that: you're rounding away from zero (as opposed to nearest even) in the event of a tie, and that you're not round negative numbers... – Rowland Shaw Aug 18 '09 at 16:19
    
In general: to do an integer divide with rounding, add half of the dividend before dividing. Rowland's caveats apply. – Laurence Gonsalves Aug 18 '09 at 16:25
    
@Rowland: If you expect negative numbers, then its easy to account for that using (msec<0?-1:1)*500 - of course it means more CPU cycles, so only use it if you actually need it. A similar approach can be used to handle "round towards even". – Guss Aug 19 '09 at 7:26
int seconds = msec / 1000;
if (msec % 1000 > 500)
    seconds++;
share|improve this answer
    
He explicitly said he needed it rounded. – T.J. Crowder Aug 18 '09 at 16:13
    
You people are too fast to downvote :) It took me 20 seconds after I posted to realise that rounding is needed and to add rounding part, and by that time I got 2 downvotes :) – qrdl Aug 18 '09 at 16:15

At first I did not want to write this answer after the testing on x86, but the testing on sparc Solaris showed it had a performance gain compared with "obvious solution", so maybe it would be useful to someone. I've taken it from a PDF that accompanies the book Hacker's Delight. Here it goes:

unsigned msec2sec(unsigned n) {
  unsigned q, r, t;
  n = n + 500;
  t = (n >> 7) + (n >> 8) + (n >> 12);
  q = (n >> 1) + t + (n >> 15) + (t >> 11) + (t >> 14);
  q = q >> 9;
  r = n - q*1000;
  return q + ((r + 24) >> 10);
}

as opposed to:

unsigned msec2sec_obvious(unsigned n) {
  return (n + 500)/1000;
}

On x86 the "obvious algorithm" translates into adding 500 and then a long multiply by 274877907, followed by grabbing the most significant 32 bits from edx and shifting them 6 bit right - so it beats this code above hands down (~5 times times performance difference).

However, on Solaris/sparc, the "obvious" is transformed into a call to .udiv - which all in all turns out to give a performance difference of ~2.5 times in another direction.

share|improve this answer

Something along these lines?

secs = mseconds / 1000 + (mseconds % 1000 >= 500 ? 1 : 0);
share|improve this answer
    
I like Chi's answer better. – T.J. Crowder Aug 18 '09 at 16:15
3  
Please don't put signatures under your answers. This is not a forum. – OregonGhost Aug 18 '09 at 16:16
    
I'm getting the hang of it, cheers. – T.J. Crowder Aug 18 '09 at 16:31

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