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I've got an struct array, with three fields - an array, the array's length, and a number.

N = 5;
data = struct;
for i=1:N
    n = ceil(rand * 3);
    data(i).len = n;
    data(i).array = rand(1,n);
    data(i).number = i;
end

The data looks like this:

data = 
1x5 struct array with fields:
    len    = [ 1 3 3 1 1 ]
    array  = [[0.8]; [0.7 0.9 0.4]; [0.7 0 0.3]; [0.1]; [0.3]]
    number = [ 1 2 3 4 5 ]

I can return array as a 1x9 array in several ways:

>>> [data.array] 
>>> cat(2,data.array)
[0.8 | 0.7 0.9 0.4 | 0.7 0 0.3 | 0.1 | 0.3]     %  | shows array separation

I'd like to repeat the number (data.number) len times, to produce the same length array as the concatenated array.

I'm currently doing this with arrayfun then cell2mat:

>> x = arrayfun(@(x) repmat(x.number, 1, x.len), data, 'UniformOutput', false)
x = 
    [1]    [1x3 double]    [1x3 double]    [4]    [5]
>> cell2mat(x)
[ 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 5]

This makes the numbers line up with the arrays.

arrays =  [ 0.8 | 0.7 0.9 0.4 | 0.7 0 0.3 | 0.1 | 0.3 ] 
numbers = [ 1   | 2   2   2   | 3   3   3 | 4   | 5   ]

The idea behind this is to feed the data to the GPU for processing - but rearranging the data takes orders of magnitude longer than the actual processing.

Arrayfun takes ~5 seconds when N=100,000, and a for loop calling repmat takes ~4 seconds.

Is there a faster way to rearrange data from uneven arrays in structures into matching length 1d arrays? I'm open to using a different data structure.


Testing vectorised method:

data = struct;
data(1).len = 1;
data(1).array = [1 2 3];
data(1).number = 11;
data(2).len = 0;
data(2).array = [];
data(2).number = 12;
data(3).len = 2;
data(3).array = [4 5 6; 7 8 9];
data(3).number = 13;

list_of_array = cat(1,data.array)

idx = zeros(1,size(list_of_array,1));
% Set start of each array to 1
len = cumsum([data.len])
idx(len) = 1
% Flat indices
idx = cumsum([1 idx(1:end-1)])

nf = [data.number]
repeated_num_faces = nf(idx)

Gives the output:

list_of_array =
     1     2     3
     4     5     6
     7     8     9
len =
     1     1     3    % Cumulative lengths
idx =
     1     0     1    % Ones at start
idx =
     1     2     2    % Flat indexes - should be [1 3 3]
nf =
    11    12    13    % Numbers expanded
repeated_num_faces =
    11    12    12    % Wrong .numbers - should be [11 13 13]
share|improve this question
    
Ok. The vectorized code will work for empty data.array if you assure that when data(i).array is empty, the data(i).number is empty as well. Otherwise the number mapping is inconsistent with the array lengths. – angainor Oct 19 '12 at 9:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, struct is not the easiest to deal with here. Definitely, you should not use repmat. Rather than that, preallocate the data_number array and do a for loop:

tic;
data_array  = [data(:).array];
data_number = zeros(size(data_array));
start = 1;
for i=1:N
    nel = data(i).len;
    data_number(start:start+nel-1) = data(i).number;
    start = start+nel;
end
toc;

Here is another 'vectorized' solution using cumsum to mark the indices in the 'flat' vector

tic;
data_array  = [data.array];
data_number = zeros(size(data_array));

% cumulative sum of number of elements in every array
len = cumsum([data.len]);

% mark the end of every array in a 'flat' vector
data_number(len) = 1;

% compute 'flat' indices for every data(i).array
data_number = cumsum([1 data_number(1:end-1)]);

% extract the data.number field
data_num = [data.number];
data_number = data_num(data_number);
toc;

For a data set of N=1e5 the times are:

Elapsed time is 0.153539 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.110694 seconds.
share|improve this answer
    
0.35s on mine, using 1e5 points! Much better - thank you very much! – Alex L Oct 18 '12 at 8:27
1  
@AlexL You might want to correct the code - there was a -1 missing. I have also added a similar performing 'vectorized' version. – angainor Oct 18 '12 at 8:30
    
In your 'vectorised' solution, am I correct in thinking that you assume that .number is it's index in the array? – Alex L Oct 18 '12 at 8:40
    
@AlexL Yes! good point. But in your example it actually is simply i, so I guess I forgot about the data.number. Do you need this fixed? It can be done. – angainor Oct 18 '12 at 8:43
1  
@AlexL I have updated my answer - since those are just indices it is trivial to extract the data.number values. But it does seem like loop is faster. – angainor Oct 18 '12 at 8:51

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