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I wrote a simple CUDA kernel as follows:

    __global__ void cudaDoSomethingInSharedMemory(float* globalArray, pitch){

      __shared__ float sharedInputArray[1088];
      __shared__ float sharedOutputArray[1088];

      int tid = threadIdx.x //Use 1D block
      int rowIdx = blockIdx.x //Use 1D grid

      int rowOffset = pitch/sizeof(float);//Offset in elements (not in bytes)

       //Copy data from global memory to shared memory (checked)
       while(tid < 1088){
           sharedInputArray[tid] = *(((float*) globalArray) + rowIdx*rowOffset + tid);
           tid += blockDim.x;
           __syncthreads();
       }
       __syncthreads();

       //Do something (already simplified and the problem still exists)
       tid = threadIdx.x;
       while(tid < 1088){
           if(tid%2==1){
              if(tid == 1087){
                 sharedOutputArray[tid/2 + 544] = 321;
              }
              else{
                  sharedOutputArray[tid/2 + 544] = 321;
              }
           }
           tid += blockDim.x;
           __syncthreads();
       }

       tid = threadIdx.x;
       while(tid < 1088){
           if(tid%2==0){
               if(tid==0){
                    sharedOutputArray[tid/2] = 123;
               }
               else{
                    sharedOutputArray[tid/2] = 123;
               }

           }
           tid += blockDim.x;
           __syncthreads();
       }
       __syncthreads();

       //Copy data from shared memory back to global memory (and add read-back for test)
       float temp = -456;
       tid = threadIdx.x;
       while(tid < 1088){
           *(((float*) globalArray) + rowIdx*rowOffset + tid) = sharedOutputArray[tid];
            temp = *(((float*) globalArray) + rowIdx*rowOffset + tid);//(1*) Errors are found.
            __syncthreads();
            tid += blockDim.x;
       }
       __syncthreads();
    }

The code is to change "sharedOutputArray" from "interlaced" to "clustered" : "123 321 123 321 ... 123 321" is changed to "123 123 123.. 123 321 321 321...321" and output the clustered result to the global memory array "globalArray". "globalArray" is allocated by "cudaMallocPitch()"

This kernel is used to process a 2D array. The idea is simple: one block for one row (so 1D grid and the number of blocks equals the number of rows) and N threads for each row. The row number is 1920 and column number is 1088. So there are 1920 blocks.

The problem is: when N (the number of threads in one block) is 64, 128 or 256, everything works (at least looks like working) fine. However, when N was 512 (I am using GTX570 with CUDA computation capability 2.0 and the maximum size for each dimension of one block is 1024), the errors happened.

The errors are: The elements (each one is a 4-byte floating number) in a row in the global memory from position 256 to 287 (index starts at 0, error strip length is 32 elements, 128 bits) is 0 rather than 123. It looks like "123 123 123 ... 0 0 0 0 0... 0 123 123 ...". I checked the line above (1*) and those elements were 123 in "sharedOutputArray" and when the element (for example tid==270) was read in (1*), "temp" showed 0. I tried to see "tid==255" and "tid==288" and the element was 123 (corrent). This type of error happened in almost all 1920 rows.

I tried to "synchronize" (maybe already over-synchronized) the threads but it did not work. What makes me confused is why 64,128 or 256 threads worked fine but 512 did not work. I know using 512 threads may not be optimized for the performance and I just would like to know where I made the mistake.

Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
    
How many resources (registers per thread) need your kernel? (compile with --ptxas-options=-v). When something does not work from a number of threads may be related with the available resources. –  pQB Oct 18 '12 at 9:50
    
How did you check the result? After some launches, your memory may be corrupted with old values that you think your kernel has updated, but there were already updated by a previous run. –  pQB Oct 18 '12 at 9:51
    
can you provide a complete, compilable code example? –  Robert Crovella Oct 18 '12 at 15:45
    
There are many syntactical errors in the code as posted. For example you have lines of code with no terminating semicolons, and "pitch" in the kernel declaration doesn't contain a type qualifier. Did you mean to use if (tid = 1087) ? It's tough to say what your code might be doing since this can't be your code. Your problem could also be related to the pitch value, which we don't know since you haven't provided the kernel invocation. –  Robert Crovella Oct 18 '12 at 16:04
    
To pQB: the register number is 21 per thread. And that limited the number of blocks in each SM. And I checked the result by add the "temp" variable for read-back. And I also looked into the memory (by CUDA Nsight 2.2 + Visual Studio 2010). There are 0s in the global memory (I think that memory check reflects the "current" status because when there was no error, there was no 0 in the memory). Thank you for your help. –  DFTandFFT Oct 18 '12 at 19:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are using __syncthreads() inside conditional code where the condition does not evaluate uniformly between the threads of a block. Don't do that.

In your case you can simply remove the __syncthreads() inside the while loops, as it serves no purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right. Now the code works. I deleted all the "__syncthreads()"s in the while block and kept (and added) "__synchthreads()" just after each while block. I just keep my wrong code there in case anyone has a similar problem. Thank you very much for your help! –  DFTandFFT Oct 18 '12 at 19:27

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