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I have a tab separated file and I want to remove lines (keep one copy) that are identical only in the first three columns. I prefer to do this using unix, for instance awk or uniq.

Input file:

Supercontig_1.1 241783  286397  5677    52
Supercontig_1.1 241783  286397  5678    53
Supercontig_1.1 241783  286397  5679    53
Supercontig_1.2 10500  25700  3000    57
Supercontig_1.2 10500  25700  3001    59
Supercontig_1.2 10500  25700  3002    59
Supercontig_1.3 2000  7000  5686    60
Supercontig_1.3 2000  7000  5687    60

Output:

 Supercontig_1.1 241783  286397  5677    52
 Supercontig_1.2 10500  25700  3000    57
 Supercontig_1.3 2000  7000  5686    60
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One way using awk:

awk '!array[$1,$2,$3]++' file.txt

Results:

Supercontig_1.1 241783 286397 5677 52
Supercontig_1.2 10500 25700 3000 57
Supercontig_1.3 2000 7000 5686 60
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Works. Thanks a lot! –  Jon Oct 18 '12 at 9:43
    
careful - concatenating the fields like that will produce the wrong output if, for example, the first line contains "1 23 4" and the second line contains "1 2 34" since they will both map to "1234". You need to use a pseudo-multi-dimensional array for this: !a[$1,$2,$3]++. –  Ed Morton Oct 18 '12 at 12:43
    
Thanks @EdMorton! - small oversight. I think I often use FS, but even that could have problems. I've done some testing, the comma actually sets the null separator: \0. Interesting. –  Steve Oct 18 '12 at 12:54
    
The comma is translated to the value of the SUBSEP built-in variable. It's why I said "pseudo"-multi-dimensional because it's not really multi-D, you just get one index made up of $1 SUBSEP $2 SUBSEP $3. Letr you can do "for (idx in array) { split(idx,idxA,SUBSEP);...}" to get $1, $2, and $3 back in the idxA array. –  Ed Morton Oct 18 '12 at 13:48
    
@EdMorton: wow, I'm still learning awk. Hadn't touched SUBSEP before. I usually use FS. Cool tip, thanks! –  Steve Oct 18 '12 at 13:56

this oneliner does the trick:

awk '!a[$1$2$3]++' file

test

kent$  echo "Supercontig_1.1 241783  286397  5677    52
dquote> Supercontig_1.1 241783  286397  5678    53
dquote> Supercontig_1.1 241783  286397  5679    53
dquote> Supercontig_1.2 10500  25700  3000    57
dquote> Supercontig_1.2 10500  25700  3001    59
dquote> Supercontig_1.2 10500  25700  3002    59
dquote> Supercontig_1.3 2000  7000  5686    60
dquote> Supercontig_1.3 2000  7000  5687    60
dquote> "|awk '!a[$1$2$3]++'
Supercontig_1.1 241783  286397  5677    52
Supercontig_1.2 10500  25700  3000    57
Supercontig_1.3 2000  7000  5686    60
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