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I was astonished that a thing this simple has been troubling me. Below is the code

list = []
f = open("log.txt", "rb")  # log.txt file has line separated values, 


for i in f.readlines():
    for value in i.split(" "):
        list.append(value)

print list

The output is

['xx00', '\n', 'xx01in', '\n', 'xx01na', '\n', 'xx01oz', '\n', 'xx01uk', '\n']

How can I get rid of the new line i.e. '\n'?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If line-separated means that there is only one value per line, you don't need split() at all:

with open('log.txt', 'rb') as f:
    mylist = map(str.strip, f)

In Python 3 wrap map() in a list().

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thanks Janne this worked. –  Venu Murthy Oct 19 '12 at 12:30
list = []
f = open("log.txt", "rb")  # log.txt file has line separated values, 


for i in f.readlines():
    for value in i.strip().split(" "):
        list.append(value)

print list

.strip() removes trailing newlines. to be explicit you can use .strip('\n') or .strip('\r\n') in some cases.

you can read more about .strip() here

edit

better way to do what you wanted:

with open("log.txt", 'rb') as f:
    mylist = [val for subl in [l.split(' ') for l in f.read().splitlines()] for val in subl]

for an answer which is much easier on the eyes, you can import itertools and use chain to flatten the list of lists, like @Jon Clements example

so it would look like this:

from itertools import chain
with open("log.txt", 'rb') as f:
    mylist = list(chain.from_iterable(l.split(' ') for l in f.read().splitlines()))
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1  
Your "better" way results in a list of lists, one for each line. The OP appears to be trying to create a flat list. –  Ben Oct 18 '12 at 9:18
    
@Ben will edit for a fix. –  Inbar Rose Oct 18 '12 at 9:19

If you have a bunch of lines with space separated values, and you just want a list of all the values without caring about where the line breaks were (which appears to be the case from your example, since you're always appending to the same list regardless of what line you're on), then don't bother looping over lines. Just read the whole file as a single string and call split() with no arguments; it will split the string on any sequence of one or more whitespace characters, including both spaces and newlines, with the result that none of the values will contain any whitespace:

with open('log.txt', 'rb') as f:
    values = f.read().split()
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The correct way to do this, is:

with open('log.txt') as fin:
    for line in fin:
        print line.split()

By using split() without an argument, the '\n''s automatically don't become a problem (as split or split(None) uses different rules for splitting).

Or, more concisely:

from itertools import chain
with open('log.txt') as fin:
    mylist = list(chain.from_iterable(line.split() for line in fin))
share|improve this answer
    
this is using itertools but you didnt mention in your answer. –  Inbar Rose Oct 18 '12 at 9:59
    
@InbarRose good point - added import - thanks –  Jon Clements Oct 18 '12 at 10:01
with open("log.txt", "rb") as f:
    mylist = f.read().splitlines()

Also, don't use list as a variable name, as it overshadows the python type list().

share|improve this answer
    
good comment about the overshadowing. but your answer is only partial, OP wants to split the lines .split(" ") and add that to his list, not add the whole line. –  Inbar Rose Oct 18 '12 at 9:11
    
thanks Joel, but this was was not removing the space after the entry. –  Venu Murthy Oct 19 '12 at 12:30

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