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What is the behavior of the TIMESTAMP field type in relation to timezones?

Is any timestamp value inserted to that field inserted as is?

Or does it assume that the timezone of a timestamp value that is inserted is in server local time and converts it UTC?

EDIT:

Here is my test

  • I ran both PHP date() and MySQL's SELECT NOW() and they are outputting roughly equal timestamps. The results of both is not in UTC time.

  • I tried inserting to a test table with the value for the TIMESTAMP field by gotten from PHP date()

  • The value from PHP date() SHOULD have been converted to UTC. However, what I see in the database is not UTC. The value for the TIMESTAMP field is inserted as is.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

TIMESTAMP value is always saved as UTC.

MySQL converts TIMESTAMP from current timezone to UTC for storage and back from UTC to the current time zone for retrieval.

The default timezone will be the server timezone and can be set on a connection. See this.

For more details see MySQL Doc

I can explain this through an example. Please execute the queries in mysql console:

mysql> CREATE TABLE `testtable` (
         `date_timestamp` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL,
         `date_datetime` DATETIME NOT NULL
       )
       ENGINE = InnoDB;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.06 sec)

mysql> SET time_zone = '+00:00';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into testtable values(now(),now());
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.03 sec)

mysql> select * from testtable;
+---------------------+---------------------+
| date_timestamp      | date_datetime       |
+---------------------+---------------------+
| 2012-10-19 05:01:38 | 2012-10-19 05:01:38 |
+---------------------+---------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SET time_zone = '+05:30';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql>
mysql> insert into testtable values(now(),now());
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.03 sec)

mysql> select * from testtable;
+---------------------+---------------------+
| date_timestamp      | date_datetime       |
+---------------------+---------------------+
| 2012-10-19 10:31:38 | 2012-10-19 05:01:38 |
| 2012-10-19 10:31:47 | 2012-10-19 10:31:47 |
+---------------------+---------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)
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Hmmm so you are saying that whatever timestamp value I give, MySQL converts it to UTC. Did some tests and it seemed not to be the case. Do I need to do something like SET time_zone = '+00:00'; –  arvinsim Oct 19 '12 at 1:55
    
Edited my original post for my test and results. –  arvinsim Oct 19 '12 at 4:24
    
could you please check my example. When you query database the timezone will be your system timezone and the UTC date is converted automatically. You If you want to view the date in UTC. You should set the timezone with SET time_zone = '+00:00'; , if you want to see the date in UTC –  QuickSilver Oct 19 '12 at 4:58
1  
hmmm so are you saying that internally, MySQL is converting it to UTC but viewing it in tools such PHPMyAdmin and HeidiSQL makes it so it shows the timestamps in system/connection timezone? –  arvinsim Oct 19 '12 at 5:46

The TIMESTAMPT value is inserted AS IS.

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