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I want to get the declared type my number, but I have no idea how to get them. So I wrote a test with possible detection methods:

logNumber(Number(3.5), "Number");
logNumber(Number(3), "Number");
logNumber(Number(-3), "Number");
logNumber(uint(3), "uint")
logNumber(int(3), "int")
logNumber(int(-3), "int")

function logNumber(value:*, expected:String):void
{
    trace("\n\n\n ");
    trace("** Input value: " + value + "\n** Expected: " + expected + "\n")
    trace("getQualifiedClassName: ", getQualifiedClassName(value) + check(getQualifiedClassName(value), expected));

    switch (value)
    {
        case value as uint:
        {
            trace('as: uint' + check('uint', expected));
            break;
        }
        case value as int:
        {
            trace('as: int' + check('int', expected));
            break;
        }
        case value as Number:
        {
            trace('as: Number' + check('Number', expected));
            break;
        }
    }

    if(value is uint) trace("is: uint" + check('uint', expected));
    else if(value is int) trace("is: int" + check('int', expected));
    else if(value is Number) trace("is: Number" + check('Number', expected));

    trace("describeType name:" + describeType(value).@name + check(describeType(value).@name, expected));

    trace("typeof: ", typeof(value)  + check(typeof(value), expected));

    trace("\n" + describeType(value))
}

function check(type:String, expectedType:String):String
{
    return "\n  » " + (type == expectedType ? "good" : (type.toLowerCase() == expectedType.toLowerCase() ? "almost good" : "wrong"))
}

This outputs the following results to my trace panel:

3.5 as Number

** Input value: 3.5
** Expected: Number

getQualifiedClassName:  Number
  » good
as: Number
  » good
is: Number
  » good
describeType name:Number
  » good
typeof:  number
  » almost good

<type name="Number" base="Object" isDynamic="false" isFinal="true" isStatic="false">
  <extendsClass type="Object"/>
  <constructor>
    <parameter index="1" type="*" optional="true"/>
  </constructor>
</type>

3 as Number

** Input value: 3
** Expected: Number

getQualifiedClassName:  int
  » wrong
as: uint
  » wrong
is: uint
  » wrong
describeType name:int
  » wrong
typeof:  number
  » almost good

<type name="int" base="Object" isDynamic="false" isFinal="true" isStatic="false">
  <extendsClass type="Object"/>
  <constructor>
    <parameter index="1" type="*" optional="true"/>
  </constructor>
</type>

-3 as Number

** Input value: -3
** Expected: Number

getQualifiedClassName:  int
  » wrong
as: int
  » wrong
is: int
  » wrong
describeType name:int
  » wrong
typeof:  number
  » almost good

<type name="int" base="Object" isDynamic="false" isFinal="true" isStatic="false">
  <extendsClass type="Object"/>
  <constructor>
    <parameter index="1" type="*" optional="true"/>
  </constructor>
</type>

3 as uint

** Input value: 3
** Expected: uint

getQualifiedClassName:  int
  » wrong
as: uint
  » good
is: uint
  » good
describeType name:int
  » wrong
typeof:  number
  » wrong

<type name="int" base="Object" isDynamic="false" isFinal="true" isStatic="false">
  <extendsClass type="Object"/>
  <constructor>
    <parameter index="1" type="*" optional="true"/>
  </constructor>
</type>

3 as int

** Input value: 3
** Expected: int

getQualifiedClassName:  int
  » good
as: uint
  » wrong
is: uint
  » wrong
describeType name:int
  » good
typeof:  number
  » wrong

<type name="int" base="Object" isDynamic="false" isFinal="true" isStatic="false">
  <extendsClass type="Object"/>
  <constructor>
    <parameter index="1" type="*" optional="true"/>
  </constructor>
</type>

-3 as int

** Input value: -3
** Expected: int

getQualifiedClassName:  int
  » good
as: int
  » good
is: int
  » good
describeType name:int
  » good
typeof:  number
  » wrong

<type name="int" base="Object" isDynamic="false" isFinal="true" isStatic="false">
  <extendsClass type="Object"/>
  <constructor>
    <parameter index="1" type="*" optional="true"/>
  </constructor>
</type>

It's a lot to analyze, but some things are popping out:

  • If a Number equals 3.5, it will be outputted as Number, but if it is 3 it will be outputted as int/uint.
  • Its hard to detect if it is a uint or int, results are confusing and not consistent.

For a debug purposes (and just to understand how this works), I want the type that I have declared. How can I make a function that returns the right type?

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check this out: var a:Number = 3; trace(getQualifiedClassName(a));//int a+=.5; trace(getQualifiedClassName(a));//Number –  Cay Oct 18 '12 at 10:51

3 Answers 3

I'll explain why each of your tests are giving you the results they are.

as

var value:Number = 3;
trace(value as int); // 3

The as operator is a weak casting operator. It takes the left-hand value and casts it to the right-hand type, and evaluates as the result. If it cannot do the cast, it evaluates as null. In this case, Number is successfully cast to an int, and the result of 3 is subsequently evaluated.

var value:Number = 3.5;
trace(value as int); // null

In this example, the value of 3.5 cannot be cast to an int so the statement evaluates to null.

is

var value:Number = 3.5;
trace(value is int); // false

The is operator builds on the as operator, but evaluates to a Boolean value instead of a cast object. The above code is the same as,

trace((value as int) != null)

So for your purposes, is and as accomplish roughly the same thing. They both cast the left-hand value to the right-hand value. The casting type is as relevant to the statement as the value's type.

typeof

var value:Number = 3;
trace(typeof value); // number

The typeof operator is a holdover from JavaScript (of which ActionScript 3 is an extension), and evaluates to a String representation of the JavaScript primitive. Therefore, typeof has limited uses in the ActionScript 3 type system, because it will never evaluate to an ActionScript 3 class name. For example,

var mc:MovieClip = new MovieClip();
trace(typeof mc); // object

var value:int = 3;
trace(typeof value); // number

MovieClip is indeed an Object, and with this in mind it becomes obvious why typeof value evaluates to number. ActionScript 3 extends the JavaScript primitive of Number with its own types int and uint, which the compiler then enforces and optimizes. This is why you get confusing results when checking to see if an int or uint is a Number; technically, they are. ActionScript 3 primitives aren't really primitives at all, at least not in the sense of a strongly-typed language.

describeType

These are the results I am the least sure about, because it is not a language feature but an Adobe function. Take a look at this:

var value:Number = 3;
trace(describeType(value)); // int
value += 0.1;
trace(describeType(value)); // Number

It seems that the Flash Player is optimizing value into an int when it is an integer. This is probably so that they can do performance optimizations, like treat a Number as an int when it is used as the index of an Array object. Also interesting is this:

var value:int = 3;
trace(describeType(value)); // int
value += 0.1;               // value is still 3
trace(describeType(value)); // int

In this case, because we explicitly defined value as an int, the compiler avoids the run-time casting and ignores the floating point operation.

Conclusion

I don't think there is a single good way to find the compile-time class of ActionScript 3 primitives. Each of these operators will tell you what you can do, but not what you did. The language is not broken; it is dynamic, but sometimes deceptively so. The big lesson is that you shouldn't always trust the type system in AS3 to do what you think. There is a solution I can think of, but ypu will lose all of the Adobe optimizations when using uint or int on Array or Vector. You could create your own typed objects, and use getQualifiedClassName or describeType on it.

class UnsignedInteger
{
    private var v:uint = 0;

    public function UnsignedInteger(value:uint) { v = value }
    public function get value():uint { return v }
    public function set value(value:uint):void { v = value; }
 }

 var value:UnsignedInteger = new UnsignedInteger(3);
 trace(getQualifiedClassName(value)); // UnsignedInteger
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thanks for this great comment! I really appreciate the time you've put in this post, this is very helpful. I also did some extra research and found a way to do get the exact type, but that's only possible for public vars, where you also have to pass the parent object. I'll post the code in this thread. –  Mark Knol Oct 23 '12 at 9:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

(If anyone wonders, I found a solution myself. Make sure you read @antonpaker answer too, it has useful information)

There seems to be a reliable solution to find the right type of the number. However there are some restrictions; It's only possible for public vars, and you have to pass the parent object. If you use describeType of the parent object gives the exact type of the Class properties, not how it is optimized at runtime. You have to find the property inside the object to find the right type of it.

function getNameOfTypeOfProperty(object:*, property:String):String
{
    return describeType(object)..*.(hasOwnProperty('@name') && @name == property).@type;
}

If you try this out on a simple MovieClip:

trace("x:" + getNameOfTypeOfProperty(this, "x"));
// Number

trace("currentFrame:" + getNameOfTypeOfProperty(this, "currentFrame"));
// int

These values seems to be (always) right.

(Note: This function will be added to the new Reflection module of the internal version of the Temple library and probably will be available in the next release. This class nicely caches describeType too, for optimizing the describeType call)

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1  
Interesting! Glad you found something that worked. What a tricky problem. –  atonparker Oct 23 '12 at 15:29

As far as i know, for the moment there is no way to get it the compiler and the player will optimize this away and do the conversion implicitly for you.

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