Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been playing a bit with interfaces with construct signatures in TypeScript, and I became a bit confused when the following failed to type check:

class Foo {
    constructor () {
    }
}

interface Bar {
    new(): Bar;
}

function Baz(C : Bar) {
    return new C()
}

var o = Baz(Foo);

The type error is:

Supplied parameters do not match any signature of call target: Construct signatures of types 'new() => Foo' and 'Bar' are incompatible: Type 'Bar' requires a construct signature, but Type 'Foo' lacks one (C: Bar) => Bar

The type of Foo's constructor is () => Foo, and that is what I thought that Bar said. Am I missing something here?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

Here is an updated version of your code with a subtle change.

We define the Bar interface with whatever functions and variables we expect to be present.

Next, we extend the Bar interface with the NewableBar interface. This just defined a constructor that returns a Bar.

Because Foo implements Bar and has a constructor and Baz requires a NewableBar, everything is checked.

This is a little more verbose than any - but gives you the checking you want.

interface Bar {

}

interface NewableBar extends Bar {
    new();
}

class Foo implements Bar {
    constructor () {

    }
}

function Baz(C : NewableBar) {
    return new C()
}

var o = Baz(Foo);
share|improve this answer
    
Instead of using any you use a super interface (you can leave out the implements and extends, btw). That's alright, I guess, and better than any, but one thing still bugs me: Why can't you let NewableBar::new() return a NewableBar? Why does it have to be a type which is more generic than NewableBar (and obviously at least as generic as Foo)? –  Adrian Lang Oct 18 '12 at 11:30
    
@AdrianLang I put in the explicit inheritance and implementations to be explicit, but you are correct - TypeScript will happily infer those if everything matches. There is an interpretation issue when trying to treat a new() signature on a method as a particular type. –  Steve Fenton Oct 18 '12 at 13:34
    
But, this breaks whenever you try to add anything to Foo. Edit: sorry, I was doing it wrong. My construct signature should be: new(... _ : any[]) : Bar; –  farre Oct 18 '12 at 14:41
    
This is really because an uninitialized Foo doesn't have the functions that are created when you initialize it, so Foo is not substitutable for new Foo(). I will post an alternate solution in a different answer based on where I think you are going with this. –  Steve Fenton Oct 18 '12 at 14:47
add comment

I think I know where you are taking this and I think you need a subtly different approach.

This example says the following:

  • Baz must be passed an item that is newable.
  • Baz will return a Bar
  • Not all Bar's need to be newable, only those being passed to Baz

Here is the example:

interface Bar {
    sayHello(name: string): void;
}

interface Newable {
    new();
}

class Foo implements Bar {
    constructor () {

    }

    sayHello(name: string) {
        window.alert('Hello ' + name);
    }
}

function Baz(C : Newable) {
    return <Bar> new C()
}

var o = Baz(Foo);
o.sayHello('Bob');

The only danger of this approach is that you could pass something newable that wasn't a Bar to the Baz function. As you are using a dynamic feature by creating an object from an argument, this is largely unavoidable unless you are willing to pass in a pre-initialized object, in which case Baz would quite happily just accept a Bar, rather than a newable.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, something along these lines was what I wanted to achieve. With the exception that I wanted to Bar and Newable to be one interface. Thanks. –  farre Oct 19 '12 at 8:47
add comment

The problem (at least from the TypeScript compiler's point of view) is the signature of Bar's new method. If you replace the definition of Bar with the following,

interface Bar {
  new (): any;
}

it works. You might as well use new (): Foo, just Bar as return value does not work.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.