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I have configured https with JBoss6 in a Spring JSF web application and its working for entire site, but i need get https only for specific folders and files. In my web.xml I have configured it this way

folder specific code block which works but after visiting the page If I go back to a normal http page by clicking on a link in page it also comes in as https in URL

<security-constraint>
    <web-resource-collection>
        <web-resource-name>secured folder</web-resource-name>
        <url-pattern>/myfolder/*</url-pattern>
    </web-resource-collection>
    <user-data-constraint>
        <transport-guarantee>CONFIDENTIAL</transport-guarantee>
    </user-data-constraint>
</security-constraint>

the below code works if I put this only without the folder specific code block and it enables https for entire site.

<security-constraint>
     <web-resource-collection>
        <web-resource-name>Protected Area, so redirect to HTTPS</web-resource-name>
            <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
       </web-resource-collection>
       <user-data-constraint>
            <transport-guarantee>CONFIDENTIAL</transport-guarantee>
        </user-data-constraint>
</security-constraint>

Is there anything else which I have been missing to achieve this?

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1 Answer 1

What I have done in the past is put an Apache web server in front of JBoss and install and configure SSL on this instead. You can then easily configure multiple URL's and context paths to forward to different content. There are a number of advantages to using this approach in a production environment.

  1. Easily use the lightweight and simple Apache configuration for establishing public context paths.

  2. Reverse Proxy - You can easily set up a reverse proxy in this way using the mod_jk Apache plugin. Port 80 and 443 will only be open to your web server, meaning that your JBoss server(s) can sit completely behind a firewall and cannot be accessed from outside. Only the web server can communicate with the application server(s) on an AJP port of your choosing.

  3. Serve static content - Another added benefit of this is that you can place all of your static web content (Eg. images, stylesheets, javascripts, Flash objects, etc...) at a context that can be served by Apache, while forwarding a different context path to all of your dynamic JSF or JSP content on JBoss. This helps reduce redundant load on your application servers.

  4. Load Balancing - Using the mod_jk or even mod_proxy Apache plugin, you can configure Apache to act as a load balancer for your JBoss cluster. It will be able to evaluate the health of individual JBoss nodes and make an intelligent decision on which application server to forward dynamic content requests on.

What does all of this have to do with HTTPS and HTTP request on JBoss? It is apparently very hard to do correctly, I have heard this from multiple people. Doing this will allow you to easily set up one URL and context path to serve to only HTTPS dynamic content, and another to serve HTTP static web content. The following blog article is a pretty good tutorial to get you started.

http://technicalmumbojumbo.wordpress.com/2009/04/21/configuring-http-and-https-on-jboss-server/

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How exactly am I going to put an Apache Web server in front? I have not done this before how do we run two servers together for one application as have specified –  Swarne27 Oct 24 '12 at 15:54

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