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I am trying to figure out the behaviour of parent and child process. Below is my code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

int main(void)
{
    int i,j,cnt=0;
    int pid,present_pid;
    int a[10];
    for(i=0; i<10; i++) {
        a[i] = i;
    }

    i = 0;
    j = 5;
    present_pid = getpid();
    printf("Now in process %d\n",getpid());
    printf("\n*******************before fork******************\n");
    for(i=0;i<10;i++) {
        printf("  %d",a[i]);
    }
    printf("\n*******************before fork******************\n");

    int ret = fork();
    if(ret == 0) {
        printf("\n*******************after fork******************\n");
        printf("Now in process %d\n",getpid());
        printf("Child Process created");
        for(i=0; i<5; i++) {
            a[i]= +1;
            i++;
        }
    }
    else if(ret > 0) {
        printf("\nNow in process %d\n",getpid());
        for(j=5; j<10; j++) {
            a[j] = +1;
            j++;
        }
        wait();
    }

    for(i=0;i<10;i++) {
        printf("  %d",a[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}

This is the output of the program

Now in process 12248

*******************before fork******************
  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
*******************before fork******************

*******************after fork******************
Now in process 12249
Child Process created  1  1  3  3  5  5  6  7  8  9
Now in process 12248
  0  1  2  3  4  6  6  8  8 

So Initially there is only one process 12248 which forks another process (12249). Now both the process run parallel (please correct me if I am wrong). Ideally child should add 1 to the contents of array a only to the first half and parent should do the same of the second part. But as you can see the output is not as expected. Please give suggestions..

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3  
Read carefully more material about Unix/Posix/Linux programming, e.g. advancedlinuxprogramming.com which has a whole chapter dedicated to the question. Notice that fork is not defined in the C language standard, but in POSIX. –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 18 '12 at 10:51
    
Thank you for the link and yes I know fork is not defined in C, I just tagged C because I used this language for my implementation. –  user1755967 Oct 18 '12 at 11:10
    
I was criticizing the title. I would have preferred "Understanding fork mechanism in Linux" (or "in Posix", or "in Unix"). –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 18 '12 at 11:21
    
okay next time I will be careful. –  user1755967 Oct 18 '12 at 11:24

3 Answers 3

A process created by fork is a real heavyweight OS process, not only a lightweight thread! The created process does not share any memory with the process from which it was forked. Instead, the memory is copied (lazily, so-called copy-on-write), so you actually have two arrays a now and each process writes to his own copy of a.

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Thanks for your insight, just one doubt that the copying of memory (for child process) doesn't involve copying of contents at those memory locations too? –  user1755967 Oct 18 '12 at 10:59
    
copying memory does exactly mean copying the contents of the memory. What else should be copied? :) –  gexicide Oct 18 '12 at 11:09
    
Yeah just for my assurance I asked and please one more last doubt , these two processes parent and child are running parallely (Is there any way to make sure of that...) –  user1755967 Oct 18 '12 at 11:20
    
of course they are running parallely, imagine them as two now totally autonomous programs. –  gexicide Oct 18 '12 at 13:58

there are 2 small mistake in your code. Usually we don't even notice their existence.

  1. a[i]= +1; oh, dear. I guess you want to write a[i] += 1 or a[i]++.
  2. Redundant i++ and j++. The for loop has done this for you.

Correct them, and you'll get your expected answer.

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exactly.... Thanks a lot!!!! (This all happened cause I used while loop previously and replaced it by for without even noticing those i++ and j++) –  user1755967 Oct 18 '12 at 11:17

First of all make some changes to your code

 printf("Now in process %d\n",getpid());
        printf("Child Process created");
        for(i=0; i<5; i++)
         {
   -->         a[i]+= 1;
    -->     //   i++; //comment this line you are jumping 2 steps in this loop
         }

As for the concept of fork()

Whenever you do a fork() call the exact copy of the process address space is created for child process and the program counter is set to the line after the fork() call

In your case after this line

     int ret = fork();
Program Counter-->    if(ret == 0)
                           {

next,

Now both the process run parallel

Yes the parent process does run in parallel but it waits for SIGCHLD signal from child process after its execution is finished.

If the child process returns the SIGCHLD signal but the parent process didn't recieve it yet(i.e the parent process is in wait state) then the child process is called ZOMBIE process.

IF the parent process aborts abruptly and the child process is still running(or in READY state) the child process is called ORPHAN process. In this case the process called init is responsible for collecting the status of child process.

finally, the program flow. The parent process runs initially.

int ret = fork();//A child process is created

then this code executes in the child process

        if(ret == 0)
      {
        printf("\n*******************after fork******************\n");
        printf("Now in process %d\n",getpid());
        printf("Child Process created");
        for(i=0; i<5; i++)
         {
            a[i] += 1;
            //i++;
         }
      }
       else if(ret > 0)//this condition is false in child process
      {
          // rest of code
      }

//and finally this is exceuted

for(i=0;i<10;i++)
  {
    printf("  %d",a[i]);
  }
return 0;
    then child process returns SIGCHLD signal

the following code is executed in parent process

        else if(ret > 0)//this is true for parent process
      {
        printf("\nNow in process %d\n",getpid());
        for(j=5; j<10; j++)
          {
            a[j] = +1;
            j++;
          }
        wait();
      }

    for(i=0;i<10;i++)
      {
        printf("  %d",a[i]);
      }
    return 0;

}

NOTE: The parent process also returns the SIGCHLD signal and this signal is collected by init process

Whenever a new process is spawn it is by default child process of init process

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, too good ...you actually cleared all my doubts about forking. Sorry for the lame error (double increment). So if I fork two child process they will run in parallel and parent will wait? –  user1755967 Oct 18 '12 at 11:49
    
I edited my contents sorry I was a bit confused I studied that almost 2 years ago. If you create 2 child process all the processes(2 child and parent process) will run parallely. The output will then depend on the OS scheduler according to which process is scheduled first –  Bhavik Shah Oct 18 '12 at 12:00
    
Have you tried executing ptrace command in linux. It will give you the process tree hierarchy. try it it's helpful –  Bhavik Shah Oct 18 '12 at 12:21
    
Indeed it was helpful!!! , I have one more confusion that file locks set by parent process are acquired by child processes? –  user1755967 Oct 25 '12 at 13:09
    
@user1755967 : refer this cs.utah.edu/dept/old/texinfo/glibc-manual-0.02/library_23.html –  Bhavik Shah Jan 4 '13 at 12:09

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