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I have a working solution to my problem, but I will not be able to use it because it is so slow (my calculations predict that the whole simulation will take 2-3 years!). Thus I am looking for a better (faster) solution. This is (in essence) the code I am working with:

N=4
x <-NULL
for (i in 1:N) { #first loop
  v <-sample(0:1, 1000000, 1/2) #generate data
  v <-as.data.frame(v) #convert to dataframe
  v$t <-rep(1:2, each=250) #group
  v$p <-rep(1:2000, each=500) #p.number
  # second loop
  for (j in 1:2000) { #second loop
    #count rle for group 1 for each pnumber
    x <- rbind(x, table(rle(v$v[v$t==1&v$p==j])))
    #count rle for group 2 for each pnumber
    x <- rbind(x, table(rle(v$v[v$t==2&v$p==j])))
  } #end second loop
} #end first loop
#total rle counts for both group 1 & 2
y <-aggregate(x, list(as.numeric(rownames(x))), sum)

In words: The code generates a coin-flip simulation (v). A group factor is generated (1 & 2). A p.number factor is generated (1:2000). The run lengths are recorded for each p.number (1:2000) for both groups 1 & group 2 (each p.number has runs in both groups). After N loops (the first loop), the total run lengths are presented as a table (aggregate) (that is, the run lengths for each group, for each p.number, over N loops as a total).

I need the first loop because the data that I am working with comes in individual files (so I'm loading the file, calculating various statistics etc and then loading the next file and doing the same). I am much less attached to the second loop, but can't figure out how to replace it with something faster.

What can be done to the second loop to make it (hopefully, a lot) faster?

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Why do you use rle separately for the values v$t and v$p and drop all of these information when creating y? –  Sven Hohenstein Oct 18 '12 at 12:15
1  
Some more pointers: 1) don't use a data frame for v, they are inherently slow. I'd just have ordinary vectors vt <-rep(1:2, each=250) and vp <-rep(1:2000, each=500). Then you wouldn't need quite so much subsetting. in the rle() calls. –  Gavin Simpson Oct 18 '12 at 12:17
    
@SvenHohenstein Because I'm not interested in them separately, only as an aggregate of the two together. Plus this is one element of my work and I am using that data in other ways. –  Frank_Zafka Oct 18 '12 at 12:18
4  
I don't really buy that as an excuse - I'm not a programmer (I'm a Geographer so close to a Social Scientist) but I've learned how to use my tool of choice, R, efficiently. I doubt there is any low hanging fruit here in regards to the rle() and table() bits that will be any closer to your comfort zone. What I'm pointing out is the low hanging fruit that may make a bug difference without getting hands very dirty optimising the inner loop. –  Gavin Simpson Oct 18 '12 at 12:31
6  
On a general note, so please don't take this as an attack just on the OP: it simply is not possible for any scientist, engineer, or sociologist to work in a modern environment without knowing how to write and use software. I tell the same thing to the EEs and optical engineers in my company. Take training courses if you have to, but don't think you're going to survive without knowing how to write code. –  Carl Witthoft Oct 18 '12 at 12:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you just want to run rle and table for each combination of the values of v$t and v$p separately, there is no need for the second loop. It is much faster in this way:

values <- v$v + v$t * 10 + v$p * 100
runlength <- rle(values)
runlength$values <- runlength$values %% 2
x <- table(runlength)


y <- aggregate(unclass(x), list(as.numeric(rownames(x))), sum)

The whole code will look like this. If N is as low as 4, the growing object x will not be a severe problem. But generally I agree with @GavinSimpson, that it is not a good programming technique.

N=4
x <-NULL
for (i in 1:N) { #first loop
  v <-sample(0:1, 1000000, 1/2) #generate data
  v <-as.data.frame(v) #convert to dataframe
  v$t <-rep(1:2, each=250) #group
  v$p <-rep(1:2000, each=500) #p.number

  values <- v$v + N * 10 + v$t * 100 + v$p * 1000
  runlength <- rle(values)
  runlength$values <- runlength$values %% 2
  x <- rbind(x, table(runlength))

} #end first loop
y <-aggregate(x, list(as.numeric(rownames(x))), sum) #tota
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Will have a test. Thanks. –  Frank_Zafka Oct 18 '12 at 13:29
    
Wow that was fast. Don't understand it though. Ha. –  Frank_Zafka Oct 18 '12 at 13:40
    
Just tested. Your way: elapsed 2.23. My loop: elapsed 345.28. It looks like I'm onto a winner here. The only problem. I have to work out the best way of retaining this information over the first loop. –  Frank_Zafka Oct 18 '12 at 14:24
1  
@RSoul See the update. I just put my answer in your first loop. Of course you can additionally use @GavinSimpson's ideas to avoid the growing object x if you feel the procedure still is to slow. –  Sven Hohenstein Oct 18 '12 at 15:18
    
I've been trying to integrate your answer into the first loop, so that helps (I think). My N is quite large though. Phew. All good fun. Will get on with testing. –  Frank_Zafka Oct 18 '12 at 15:19

You are committing the cardinal sin of growing an object within a for() loop in R. Don't (I repeat don't) do this. Allocate sufficient storage for x at the beginning and then fill in x as you go.

x <- matrix(nrow = N * (2000 * 2), ncol = ??)

Then in the inner loop

x[ii, ] <- table(rle(....))

where ii is a loop counter that you initialise to 1 before the first loop and increment within the second loop:

x <- matrix(nrow = N * (2000 * 2), ncol = ??)
ii <- 1
for(i in 1:N) {
    .... # stuff here
    for(j in 1:2000) {
        .... # stuff here
        x[ii, ] <- table(rle(....))
        ## increment ii
        ii <- ii + 1
        x[ii, ] <- table(rle(....))
        ## increment ii
        ii <- ii + 1
    } ##  end inner loop
} ## end outer loop

Also note that you are reusing index i in bot for()loops which will not work.iis just a normal R object and so bothfor()loops will be overwriting it as the progress. USej` for the second loop as I did above.

Try that simple optimisation first and see if that will allow the real simulation to complete in an acceptable amount of time. If not, come back with a new Q showing the latest code and we can think about other optimisations. The optimisation above is simple to do, optimising table() and rle() might take a lot more work. Noting that, you might look at the tabulate() function which does the heavy lifting in table(), which might be one avenue for optimising that particular step.

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I will have to have a think about this and test it out. I know loops are bad, but I'm a social scientist not a programmer. Thanks for the answer. –  Frank_Zafka Oct 18 '12 at 11:55
3  
No, you misunderstand. Loops are not bad! The way you have done them is bad. for() will be almost as quick as lapply() and friends if you write the loop correctly and don't grow objects in the loop. Allocate storage for the entire object then fill in that object. When you are rbind()ing your result together, R has to create a new object by copying x, make it 1 row bigger and assign the new data to that new object and assign that all back as x. All that takes a lot of time. –  Gavin Simpson Oct 18 '12 at 11:58
    
Note that I don't know roughly how big the number of columns x should have. From the earlier Q, this was less than 100 so perhaps a starting point might be to have ncol = 100 to give you some wiggle room. You can always remove the extra columns after the loop has completed. –  Gavin Simpson Oct 18 '12 at 12:00
    
No. I knew my way of doing it was bad. But it works. And that is the most important thing for ME. Other solutions just blow a fuse in my brain. I can't quite see how to integrate your solution into my code, but will certainly attempt to do so. –  Frank_Zafka Oct 18 '12 at 12:00
1  
I've pretty much shown you how to do it. The code I show is very similar to yours, just without all the detailed computations you do so that the salient points are emphasised. The issue is that your code doesn't work for your real problem. You might be surprised how much efficiency you can gain by writing the loop properly. You might not even need to do the far more difficult task of optimising table or rle. –  Gavin Simpson Oct 18 '12 at 12:03

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