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I want clear $_POST array content fully, all examples what I see in internet, looks like this:

if (count($_POST) > 0) {
    foreach ($_POST as $k=>$v) {
        unset($_POST[$k]);
    }
}

Tell please, this variant will be not more better? (Point of view as saving resources)

if (count($_POST) > 0) {
     $_POST = array();
}

or not ?

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4  
Why would you want to empty $_POST? –  Lex Oct 18 '12 at 11:49
4  
You don't even need count. $_POST = array(); and you are all set. –  Mahn Oct 18 '12 at 11:49
    
After first time using POST data, I need clear they –  OTARIKI Oct 18 '12 at 11:50
1  
If you need to change the values of $_POST you are doing something wrong. –  Jon Oct 18 '12 at 11:50
3  
you dont even require to write condtion. simple $_POST = array(); statement will do. –  SLAYER Oct 18 '12 at 11:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Yes, that is fine. $_POST is just another variable, except it has (super)global scope.

$_POST = array();

...will be quite enough. The loop is useless. It's probably best to keep it as an array rather than unset it, in case other files are attempting to read it and assuming it is an array.

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Technically it has superglobal scope, since the global scope in PHP isn't. –  lonesomeday Oct 18 '12 at 11:53

This is better:

unset($_POST);
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1  
-1. Other parts of the code may assume $_POST is an array. –  Nathan Arthur Jun 12 '14 at 13:51

You can use a combination of both unset() and initialization:

unset($_POST);
$_POST = array();

Or in a single statement:

unset($_POST) ? $_POST = array() : $_POST = array();

But what is the reason you want to do this?

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1  
No need for unset at all. –  Mahn Oct 18 '12 at 12:06
1  
@Mahn Those who are using the PHP filter functions do not use $_POST to get access to form values. Thus, clearing $_POST is just a way of clearing resources. For instance, if someone dumps more characters into a form field than what is allowed (bypassing all client side validation) and that person is using PHP filter functions, $_POST is something that the developer may want to clear. I have my sanitizer do a pre-check control string lengths, then throw and catch a RangeException if a control has more characters than allowed. One might still use $_POST to get a count of controls submitted. –  Anthony Rutledge Jul 18 at 22:10
    
@AnthonyRutledge sure, the point is that in this scenario you don't need to both unset it and set it to an empty array. Simply doing the later is enough to clear it. –  Mahn Jul 19 at 16:02

To answer "why" someone might use it, I was tempted to use it since I had the $_POST values stored after the page refresh or while going from one page to another. My sense tells me this is not a good practice, but it works nevertheless.

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