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I used the following line to convert float to int, but it's not as accurate as I'd like:

 float a=8.61f;
 int b;

 b=(int)a;

The result is : 8 (It should be 9)

When a = -7.65f, the result is : -7 (It should be -8)

What's the best way to do it ?

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10  
I should point out that just typecasting truncates the value and does not perform any rounding/flooring operations on the value. – Brian Graham Mar 19 '12 at 16:05
up vote 342 down vote accepted

Using Math.round() will round the float to the nearest integer.

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1  
why is the typecast needed after Math.round()? – necromancer Jun 9 '12 at 1:51
61  
Math.round() returns int value so typecasting using (int) is redundant. – Solvek Jul 2 '12 at 18:13
2  
use either/or... (int)foo is simpler. – yuttadhammo Jul 12 '12 at 9:39
13  
Solvek's answer is right, but I'd like to point out that Math.round() can have two different output types based on the input. Math.round(double a) returns a long. Math.round(float a) returns an int. docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/… – Hososugi Mar 13 '14 at 17:47

Actually, there are different ways to downcast float to int, depending on the result you want to achieve: (for int i, float f)

  • round (the closest integer to given float)

    i = Math.round(f);
      f =  2.0 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.22 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.68 -> i =  3
      f = -2.0 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.22 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.68 -> i = -3
    

    note: this is, by contract, equal to (int) Math.floor(f + 0.5f)

  • truncate (i.e. drop everything after the decimal dot)

    i = (int) f;
      f =  2.0 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.22 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.68 -> i =  2
      f = -2.0 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.22 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.68 -> i = -2
    
  • ceil/floor (an integer always bigger/smaller than a given value if it has any fractional part)

    i = (int) Math.ceil(f);
      f =  2.0 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.22 -> i =  3 ; f =  2.68 -> i =  3
      f = -2.0 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.22 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.68 -> i = -2
    
    i = (int) Math.floor(f);
      f =  2.0 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.22 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.68 -> i =  2
      f = -2.0 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.22 -> i = -3 ; f = -2.68 -> i = -3
    

For rounding positive values, you can also just use (int)(f + 0.5), which works exactly as Math.Round in those cases (as per doc).

In theory you could use Math.rint(f) to do the rounding, but rint does not round 0.5 up, it rounds it up or down, whichever of the lower or higher integer is even, so it's useless in most cases.

See

http://mindprod.com/jgloss/round.html

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Math.html

for more information and some examples.

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Math.round(value) round the value to the nearest whole number.

Use

1) b=(int)(Math.round(a));

2) a=Math.round(a);  
   b=(int)a;
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Use Math.round(value) then after type cast it to integer.

float a = 8.61f;
int b = (int)Math.round(a);
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Math.round also return int value, so you don't need to typecast. Int b=Math.round(float a);

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5  
Other answers already say this. Please only add a new answer when you have something new to add. (Also, Math.round doesn't return int.) – Jeffrey Bosboom Mar 4 '15 at 2:04

Instead of Math.round(a) just use b = (int) a + 0.5;

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+1 for the 2nd approach, b = (int)(a + 0.5F), though I wonder which would be better in term of performance. – sactiw May 30 '14 at 14:24
1  
-1: For a=-1.6 this yields 1, because the way (int) rounds negative numbers (by truncation). – Anony-Mousse Sep 24 '14 at 12:55
1  
If you look at the implementation of Math.round(), that's basically what it's doing. I always prefer to use the util method though -- the intention is clear. – Matt Logan Jan 21 '15 at 19:29
    
@MattLogan nope; Math.round() uses floor, not truncate - and that's exactly what Anony-Mousse said - Math.round(f) = (int) Math.floor(f + 0.5f), not (int)(a + 0.5f) – vaxquis Feb 25 '15 at 20:28
    
You're right, forgot about the negative number case. – Matt Logan Feb 25 '15 at 23:22

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