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I have a percentage string in c# and want to return it into a double value.

for example . . .

string p = "6%";

Now I want to turn this string into

double value = 0.06;

How can I so that? I tried to use Math.Round() and put -2 in the digits to be rounded but it only allows numbers 0-15.

I am glad for any help you could offer.

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Maybe something like:

double value = double.Parse(p.TrimEnd(new[] {'%'}))/100;
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You can using split and cast it to double

double value = double.Parse(p.Split(new char[]{'%'})[0]) / 100;
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You cannot cast a string to a double. –  Henk Holterman Oct 18 '12 at 12:17
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But you apparently can get upvotes by saying you can cast a string to a double. –  Rawling Oct 18 '12 at 12:18
    
double value = double.Parse( p.Split('%')[0] ) / 100; –  kenny Oct 18 '12 at 12:19
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string p = "6%";
string p2 = p.Remove(p.Length - 1);
double value = Convert.ToDouble(p2) / 100;
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Careful, this will result in integer division. –  Rawling Oct 18 '12 at 12:19
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Almost. Your division will yield 0. 6 / 100 == 0, 6 / 100.0 == 0.06 –  Henk Holterman Oct 18 '12 at 12:19
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I think casting the p2 into a double will sort this? –  Liam Oct 18 '12 at 12:21
    
Yes, but it was ToInt32 in the 1st revision. –  Henk Holterman Oct 18 '12 at 12:24
    
yep! You were right! :) –  Liam Oct 18 '12 at 12:25
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   double value = double.Parse(p.Trim().Split('%')[0]) / 100;
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+1 Well, I would use Double.Parse(p.TrimRight(' ', '%')) to do little bit more error checking (or "6%abc" may be considered valid) but it works! –  Adriano Oct 18 '12 at 12:21
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