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What is the most efficient way to create an arbitrary length zero filled array in JavaScript?

share|improve this question
4  
Some actual data on this: jsperf.com/zeroarrayjs – Web_Designer May 15 '15 at 21:33
3  
ES6 fill allows to do this natively. – Salvador Dali Sep 26 '15 at 22:25
    
arr = new Array(length+1).joint(character).split(''); – Jordan Stefanelli Nov 29 '15 at 19:05

30 Answers 30

Although this is an old thread, I wanted to add my 2 cents to it. Not sure how slow/fast this is, but it's a quick one liner. Here is what I do:

If I want to pre-fill with a number:

Array.apply(null, Array(5)).map(Number.prototype.valueOf,0);
// [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]

If I want to pre-fill with a string:

Array.apply(null, Array(3)).map(String.prototype.valueOf,"hi")
// ["hi", "hi", "hi"]

Other answers have suggested:

new Array(5+1).join('0').split('')
// ["0", "0", "0", "0", "0"]

but if you want 0 (the number) and not "0" (zero inside a string), you can do:

new Array(5+1).join('0').split('').map(parseFloat)
// [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
share|improve this answer
4  
Great answer! Can you please explain the trick with Array.apply(null, new Array(5)).map(...)? Cause simply doing (new Array(5)).map(...) won't work as the spec tells – Dmitry Pashkevich Jul 3 '13 at 11:03
20  
(btw, we don't really need the new) When you do Array(5) you're creating an object that kinda looks like this: { length: 5, __proto__: Array.prototype } - try console.dir( Array(5) ). Notice that it doesn't have any properties 0, 1, 2, etc. But when you apply that unto the Array constructor, it's like saying Array(undefined, undefined, undefined, undefined, undefined). And you get an object that kinda looks like { length: 5, 0: undefined, 1: undefined...}. map works on the properties 0,1, etc. which is why your example doesn't work, but when you use apply it does. – zertosh Jul 3 '13 at 15:58
4  
The first parameter for .apply is actually what you want the this to be. For these purposes the this doesn't matter - we only really care about the parameter spreading "feature" of .apply - so it can be any value. I like null because it's cheap, you probably don't want to use {} or [] since you'd be instantiating an object for no reason. – zertosh Jul 4 '13 at 0:15
12  
95% slower in my test case jsperf.com/zerofill-2d-array – Alix Axel Dec 25 '13 at 2:45
2  
Also initialize with size + assign is much faster than push. See test case jsperf.com/zero-fill-2d-array – Colin Apr 15 '14 at 15:05

ES6 introduces Array.prototype.fill. It can be used like this:

new Array(len).fill(0);

Not sure if it's fast, but I like it because it's short and self-describing.

share|improve this answer
    
Polyfill available here developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Mirko Oct 15 '14 at 14:21
    
This isn't working with babel nor even enabling the experimental JavaScript flag on Chrome. Any idea(s) why? – Con Antonakos Jul 24 '15 at 0:58
    
@ConAntonakos It should work on Chrome 45, or Chrome 36 with “Enable Experimental JavaScript” – Oriol Jul 24 '15 at 1:10
    
fill is fast. new Array(len) is painfully slow. (arr = []).length = len; arr.fill(0); is about the fastest solution ive seen anywhere... or at least tied – Pimp Trizkit Sep 22 '15 at 16:08
1  
@PimpTrizkit arr = Array(n) and (arr = []).length = n behave identically according to the spec. In some implementations one could be faster, but I don't think there is a big difference. – Oriol Sep 22 '15 at 16:39

Note added August 2013, updated February 2015: The answer below from 2009 relates to JavaScript's generic Array type. It doesn't relate to the newer typed arrays being defined in ES6 [and available now in many browsers], like Int32Array and such. Also note that ES6 adds/will add a fill method to both Arrays and typed arrays, which is likely to be the most efficient way to fill them...

Also, it can make a big difference to some implementations how you create the array. Chrome's V8 engine, in particular, tries to use a highly-efficient, contiguous-memory array if it thinks it can, shifting to the object-based array only when necessary.


With most languages, it would be pre-allocate, then zero-fill, like this:

function newFilledArray(len, val) {
    var rv = new Array(len);
    while (--len >= 0) {
        rv[len] = val;
    }
    return rv;
}

But, JavaScript arrays aren't really arrays, they're key/value maps just like all other JavaScript objects, so there's no "pre-allocate" to do (setting the length doesn't allocate that many slots to fill), nor is there any reason to believe that the benefit of counting down to zero (which is just to make the comparison in the loop fast) isn't outweighed by adding the keys in reverse order when the implementation may well have optimized their handling of the keys related to arrays on the theory you'll generally do them in order.

In fact, Matthew Crumley pointed out that counting down is markedly slower on Firefox than counting up, a result I can confirm — it's the array part of it (looping down to zero is still faster than looping up to a limit in a var). Apparently adding the elements to the array in reverse order is a slow op on Firefox. In fact, the results vary quite a bit by JavaScript implementation (which isn't all that surprising). Here's a quick and dirty test page (below) for browser implementations (very dirty, doesn't yield during tests, so provides minimal feedback and will run afoul of script time limits). I recommend refreshing between tests; FF (at least) slows down on repeated tests if you don't.

The fairly complicated version that uses Array#concat is faster than a straight init on FF as of somewhere between 1,000 and 2,000 element arrays. On Chrome's V8 engine, though, straight init wins out every time...

Here's the test page (live copy):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8">
<title>Zero Init Test Page</title>
<style type='text/css'>
body {
    font-family:    sans-serif;
}
#log p {
    margin:     0;
    padding:    0;
}
.error {
    color:      red;
}
.winner {
    color:      green;
    font-weight:    bold;
}
</style>
<script type='text/javascript' src='prototype-1.6.0.3.js'></script>
<script type='text/javascript'>
var testdefs = {
    'downpre':  {
        total:  0,
        desc:   "Count down, pre-decrement",
        func:   makeWithCountDownPre
    },
    'downpost': {
        total:  0,
        desc:   "Count down, post-decrement",
        func:   makeWithCountDownPost
    },
    'up':       {
        total:  0,
        desc:   "Count up (normal)",
        func:   makeWithCountUp
    },
    'downandup':  {
        total:  0,
        desc:   "Count down (for loop) and up (for filling)",
        func:   makeWithCountDownArrayUp
    },
    'concat':   {
        total:  0,
        desc:   "Concat",
        func:   makeWithConcat
    }
};

document.observe('dom:loaded', function() {
    var markup, defname;

    markup = "";
    for (defname in testdefs) {
        markup +=
            "<div><input type='checkbox' id='chk_" + defname + "' checked>" +
            "<label for='chk_" + defname + "'>" + testdefs[defname].desc + "</label></div>";
    }
    $('checkboxes').update(markup);
    $('btnTest').observe('click', btnTestClick);
});

function epoch() {
    return (new Date()).getTime();
}

function btnTestClick() {

    // Clear log
    $('log').update('Testing...');

    // Show running
    $('btnTest').disabled = true;

    // Run after a pause while the browser updates display
    btnTestClickPart2.defer();
}
function btnTestClickPart2() {

    try {
        runTests();
    }
    catch (e) {
        log("Exception: " + e);
    }

    // Re-enable the button; we don't yheidl
    $('btnTest').disabled = false;
}

function runTests() {
    var start, time, counter, length, defname, def, results, a, invalid, lowest, s;

    // Get loops and length
    s = $F('txtLoops');
    runcount = parseInt(s);
    if (isNaN(runcount) || runcount <= 0) {
        log("Invalid loops value '" + s + "'");
        return;
    }
    s = $F('txtLength');
    length = parseInt(s);
    if (isNaN(length) || length <= 0) {
        log("Invalid length value '" + s + "'");
        return;
    }

    // Clear log
    $('log').update('');

    // Do it
    for (counter = 0; counter <= runcount; ++counter) {

        for (defname in testdefs) {
            def = testdefs[defname];
            if ($('chk_' + defname).checked) {
                start = epoch();
                a = def.func(length);
                time = epoch() - start;
                if (counter == 0) {
                    // Don't count (warm up), but do check the algorithm works
                    invalid = validateResult(a, length);
                    if (invalid) {
                        log("<span class='error'>FAILURE</span> with def " + defname + ": " + invalid);
                        return;
                    }
                }
                else {
                    // Count this one
                    log("#" + counter + ": " + def.desc + ": " + time + "ms");
                    def.total += time;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    for (defname in testdefs) {
        def = testdefs[defname];
        if ($('chk_' + defname).checked) {
            def.avg = def.total / runcount;
            if (typeof lowest != 'number' || lowest > def.avg) {
                lowest = def.avg;
            }
        }
    }

    results =
        "<p>Results:" +
        "<br>Length: " + length +
        "<br>Loops: " + runcount +
        "</p>";
    for (defname in testdefs) {
        def = testdefs[defname];
        if ($('chk_' + defname).checked) {
            results += "<p" + (lowest == def.avg ? " class='winner'" : "") + ">" + def.desc + ", average time: " + def.avg + "ms</p>";
        }
    }
    results += "<hr>";
    $('log').insert({top: results});
}

function validateResult(a, length) {
    var n;

    if (a.length != length) {
        return "Length is wrong";
    }
    for (n = length - 1; n >= 0; --n) {
        if (a[n] != 0) {
            return "Index " + n + " is not zero";
        }
    }
    return undefined;
}

function makeWithCountDownPre(len) {
    var a;

    a = new Array(len);
    while (--len >= 0) {
        a[len] = 0;
    }
    return a;
}

function makeWithCountDownPost(len) {
    var a;

    a = new Array(len);
    while (len-- > 0) {
        a[len] = 0;
    }
    return a;
}

function makeWithCountUp(len) {
    var a, i;

    a = new Array(len);
    for (i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
        a[i] = 0;
    }
    return a;
}

function makeWithCountDownArrayUp(len) {
    var a, i;

    a = new Array(len);
    i = 0;
    while (--len >= 0) {
        a[i++] = 0;
    }
    return a;
}

function makeWithConcat(len) {
    var a, rem, currlen;

    if (len == 0) {
        return [];
    }
    a = [0];
    currlen = 1;
    while (currlen < len) {
        rem = len - currlen;
        if (rem < currlen) {
            a = a.concat(a.slice(0, rem));
        }
        else {
            a = a.concat(a);
        }
        currlen = a.length;
    }
    return a;
}

function log(msg) {
    $('log').appendChild(new Element('p').update(msg));
}
</script>
</head>
<body><div>
<label for='txtLength'>Length:</label><input type='text' id='txtLength' value='10000'>
<br><label for='txtLoops'>Loops:</label><input type='text' id='txtLoops' value='10'>
<div id='checkboxes'></div>
<br><input type='button' id='btnTest' value='Test'>
<hr>
<div id='log'></div>
</div></body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure that backwards filling would matter here, given you are only accessing elements (not deleting them) and you've already pre-allocated. Am I wrong? – Triptych Aug 18 '09 at 20:52
    
the point of the backwards fill is not particularly to do with the array, it's to do with the escape condition for the while - the falsey 0 terminates the loop very efficiently – annakata Aug 18 '09 at 20:54
    
(though I've just noticed this code doesn't actually make use of that) – annakata Aug 18 '09 at 20:56
    
@annakata, you can't make use of that here, because 0 is a valid index. – Triptych Aug 18 '09 at 20:59
1  
@Ninjakannon: Good point, I've added that to the answer. – T.J. Crowder Feb 8 '15 at 15:51

The already mentioned ES 6 fill method takes care of this nicely. Most modern desktop browsers already support the required Array prototype methods as of today (Chromium, FF, Edge and Safari) [1]. You can look up details on MDN. A simple usage example is

a = new Array(10).fill(0);

Given the current browser support you should be cautious to use this unless you are sure your audience uses modern Desktop browsers.

share|improve this answer
1  
If you fill with a reference type it will be the same reference across all of them. new Array(10).fill(null).map(() => []) would be a succinct way to get around this (burned me initially haha) – John Culviner Feb 17 at 18:17
function makeArrayOf(value, length) {
  var arr = [], i = length;
  while (i--) {
    arr[i] = value;
  }
  return arr;
}

makeArrayOf(0, 5); // [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]

makeArrayOf('x', 3); // ['x', 'x', 'x']

Note that while is usually more efficient than for-in, forEach, etc.

share|improve this answer
3  
Isn't the i local variable extraneous? length is passed by value so you should be able to decrement it directly. – Sean Bright Aug 18 '09 at 18:26
2  
Of course. I only added i for convention/clarity. – kangax Aug 18 '09 at 18:28
2  
...but of course. – Timmerz Jul 16 '13 at 22:44
3  
Although this looks great at first, unfortunately it's very slow to assign values at an arbitrary point in an arary (e.g. arr[i] = value). It's much faster to loop through from beginning to end and use arr.push(value). It's annoying, because I prefer your method. – Nick Brunt Jul 26 '14 at 15:13

I've tested all combinations of pre-allocating/not pre-allocating, counting up/down, and for/while loops in IE 6/7/8, Firefox 3.5, Chrome, and Opera.

The functions below was consistently the fastest or extremely close in Firefox, Chrome, and IE8, and not much slower than the fastest in Opera and IE 6. It's also the simplest and clearest in my opinion. I've found several browsers where the while loop version is slightly faster, so I'm including it too for reference.

function newFilledArray(length, val) {
    var array = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        array[i] = val;
    }
    return array;
}

or

function newFilledArray(length, val) {
    var array = [];
    var i = 0;
    while (i < length) {
        array[i++] = val;
    }
    return array;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is by far the fastest that I've seen so far. – James M. Aug 18 '09 at 22:24
1  
You could also throw the var array = [] declaration into the first part of the for loop actually, separated by only a comma. – damianb Nov 19 '12 at 14:51
    
I like that suggestion by damianb, but remember to put the assignment and comma before the incrementation! `for (var i = 0; i < length; array[i] = val, i++); – punstress Mar 15 '15 at 1:39
    
Do what everyone else is missing to your second one, and set the length of the array to the length value already given so that it's not constantly changing. Brought a 1 million length array of zero's from 40ms to 8 on my machine. – Jonathan Gray Sep 7 '15 at 7:49
    
I seem to get a 10-15% speed increase when I refactor this solution into a one liner. for (i = 0, array = []; i < length; ++i) array[i] = val;.. Fewer blocks? ... anyhow, also... if I set the array.length of the new array to the length.. i seem to get another 10%-15% speed increase in FF... in Chrome, it seems to double the speed -> var i, array = []; array.length = length; while(i < length) array[i++] = val; (was still faster if I left it as a for loop... but the init is no longer needed, so the while is seemly faster on this version) – Pimp Trizkit Sep 22 '15 at 23:11

By default Uint8Array, Uint16Array and Uint32Array classes keep zeros as its values, so you don't need any complex filling techniques, just do:

var ary = new Uint8Array(10);

all elements of array ary will be zeros by default.

share|improve this answer

using object notation

var x = [];

zero filled? like...

var x = [0,0,0,0,0,0];

filled with 'undefined'...

var x = new Array(7);

obj notation with zeros

var x = [];
for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) x[i] = 0;

As a side note, if you modify Array's prototype, both

var x = new Array();

and

var y = [];

will have those prototype modifications

At any rate, I wouldn't be overly concerned with the efficiency or speed of this operation, there are plenty of other things that you will likely be doing that are far more wasteful and expensive than instanciating an array of arbitrary length containing zeros.

share|improve this answer
4  
Err... there are no nulls in this array - var x = new Array(7); – kangax Aug 18 '09 at 18:25
    
right you are good sir, updated – Allen Rice Aug 18 '09 at 18:36
3  
Actually, the array doesn't get filled with anything with new Array(n), not even 'undefined's, it simply sets the arrays length value to n. You can check this by calling (new Array(1)).forEach(...). forEach never executes, unlike if you call it on [undefined]. – JussiR Sep 19 '13 at 15:03
1  
new Array(7) does not create an array "filled with undefined". It creates an empty array with length 7. – RobG Dec 17 '14 at 23:06
    
You might want to reconsider parts of your answer as what @RobG is saying is critical (if what you were saying is true, mapping would have been much easier) – Abdo Aug 6 '15 at 10:06
function zeroFilledArray(size) {
    return new Array(size + 1).join('0').split('');
}
share|improve this answer
3  
You might also use new Array(size+1).join("x").split("x").map(function() { return 0; }) to get actual numbers – Yuval Apr 6 '12 at 23:27
4  
@Yuval Or just new Array(size+1).join('0').split('').map(Number) – Paulpro Jan 13 '14 at 17:25

If you need to create many zero filled arrays of different lengths during the execution of your code, the fastest way I've found to achieve this is to create a zero array once, using one of the methods mentioned on this topic, of a length which you know will never be exceeded, and then slice that array as necessary.

For example (using the function from the chosen answer above to initialize the array), create a zero filled array of length maxLength, as a variable visible to the code that needs zero arrays:

var zero = newFilledArray(maxLength, 0);

Now slice this array everytime you need a zero filled array of length requiredLength < maxLength:

zero.slice(0, requiredLength);

I was creating zero filled arrays thousands of times during execution of my code, this speeded up the process tremendously.

share|improve this answer

The way I usually do it (and is amazing fast) is using Uint8Array. For example, creating a zero filled vector of 1M elements:

  var zeroFilled = [].slice.apply(new Uint8Array(1000000))

I'm a Linux user and always have worked for me, but once a friend using a Mac had some non-zero elements. I thought his machine was malfunctioning, but still here's the safest way we found to fix it:

  var zeroFilled = [].slice.apply(new Uint8Array(new Array(1000000)) 

Edited

Chrome 25.0.1364.160

  1. Frederik Gottlieb - 6.43
  2. Sam Barnum - 4.83
  3. Eli - 3.68
  4. Joshua 2.91
  5. Mathew Crumley - 2.67
  6. bduran - 2.55
  7. Allen Rice - 2.11
  8. kangax - 0.68
  9. Tj. Crowder - 0.67
  10. zertosh - ERROR

Firefox 20.0

  1. Allen Rice - 1.85
  2. Joshua - 1.82
  3. Mathew Crumley - 1.79
  4. bduran - 1.37
  5. Frederik Gottlieb - 0.67
  6. Sam Barnum - 0.63
  7. Eli - 0.59
  8. kagax - 0.13
  9. Tj. Crowder - 0.13
  10. zertosh - ERROR

Missing the most important test (at least for me): the Node.js one. I suspect it close to Chrome benchmark.

share|improve this answer
    
I will add some benchmarks later with jsperf – durum Feb 27 '14 at 10:14
    
The test I have used. – durum Feb 28 '14 at 22:48
    
This is the most efficient way for my fingers, and for my eyes. But it's very very slow for Chrome (accord to that jsperf. 99% slower). – Orwellophile Mar 5 at 5:20

Using lodash or underscore

_.range(0, length - 1, 0);

Or if you have an array existing and you want an array of the same length

array.map(_.constant(0));
share|improve this answer
    
So glad you added this answer, as I use underscore, and I knew there was something for this... but hadn't been able to find it yet. I just wish I could create arrays of objects using this – PandaWood Oct 22 '14 at 6:02
    
@PandaWood _.range(0, length -1, 0).map(Object.new), I think. – djechlin Oct 22 '14 at 11:51
    
Should be _.range(0, length, 0), I believe. Lodash is exclusive of end value – user4815162342 Jun 25 at 21:26

My fastest function would be:

function newFilledArray(len, val) {
    var a = [];
    while(len--){
        a.push(val);
    }
    return a;
}

var st = (new Date()).getTime();
newFilledArray(1000000, 0)
console.log((new Date()).getTime() - st); // returned 63, 65, 62 milliseconds

Using the native push and shift to add items to the array is much faster (about 10 times) than declaring the array scope and referencing each item to set it's value.

fyi: I consistently get faster times with the first loop, which is counting down, when running this in firebug (firefox extension).

var a = [];
var len = 1000000;
var st = (new Date()).getTime();
while(len){
    a.push(0);
    len -= 1;
}
console.log((new Date()).getTime() - st); // returned 863, 894, 875 milliseconds
st = (new Date()).getTime();
len = 1000000;
a = [];
for(var i = 0; i < len; i++){
    a.push(0);
}
console.log((new Date()).getTime() - st); // returned 1155, 1179, 1163 milliseconds

I'm interested to know what T.J. Crowder makes of that ? :-)

share|improve this answer
    
You can make it faster by changing it to while (len--).. took my processing times from about 60ms to about 54ms – nickf Aug 21 '09 at 8:23
    
thanks nickf. I amended "my fastest function". Kudos! – Joshua Aug 21 '09 at 8:31
    
Matthew Crumbly's answer still actually beats this (30ms)! – nickf Aug 21 '09 at 8:31

What about new Array(51).join('0').split('')?

share|improve this answer
    
then .map(function(a){return +a}) ? – lonewarrior556 Jun 10 at 13:32

This concat version is much faster in my tests on Chrome (2013-03-21). About 200ms for 10,000,000 elements vs 675 for straight init.

function filledArray(len, value) {
    if (len <= 0) return [];
    var result = [value];
    while (result.length < len/2) {
        result = result.concat(result);
    }
    return result.concat(result.slice(0, len-result.length));
}

Bonus: if you want to fill your array with Strings, this is a concise way to do it (not quite as fast as concat though):

function filledArrayString(len, value) {
    return new Array(len+1).join(value).split('');
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Ok, wild. That is WAY faster than using new Array(len). BUT! I am seeing in Chrome that the subsequent reads to that data take substantially longer. Here are some timestamps to show what I mean: (Using new Array(len)) 0.365: Making Array 4.526: Executing Convolution 10.75: Convolution Complete (Using concat) 0.339: Making Array 0.591: Executing Convolution //OMG, WAY faster 18.056: Convolution Complete – Brooks May 1 '13 at 17:06

I was testing out the great answer by T.J. Crowder, and came up with a recursive merge based on the concat solution that outperforms any in his tests in Chrome (i didn't test other browsers).

function makeRec(len, acc) {
    if (acc == null) acc = [];
    if (len <= 1) return acc;
    var b = makeRec(len >> 1, [0]);
    b = b.concat(b);
    if (len & 1) b = b.concat([0]);
    return b;
},

call the method with makeRec(29).

share|improve this answer
var str = "0000000...0000";
var arr = str.split("");

usage in expressions: arr[i]*1;

EDIT: if arr supposed to be used in integer expressions, then please don't mind the char value of '0'. You just use it as follows: a = a * arr[i] (assuming a has integer value).

share|improve this answer
1  
Please add comments when downvoting – Thevs Aug 18 '09 at 20:49
2  
My downvote sorry. This is terse but not efficient, as you will be creating a string first then performing a string operation, which tend to be slow, and you would still need to then convert the resultant strings to ints, which is also slow. – Triptych Aug 18 '09 at 20:50
    
BTW, the question didn't state by what kind of "zeros" that array must be filled. Regarding performance - I think it should be faster than all previous solutions. Remenber .join("") for string concatenation? – Thevs Aug 18 '09 at 20:55
1  
Thevs - you're welcome to profile and prove me wrong. I think it's a stretch to interpret 'zero' as "the string '0'". Nobody else did. Also, just because join is fast for string concatenation does not mean split is the fastest way to create an array. – Triptych Aug 18 '09 at 20:58
1  
@dip: To be more clear: I gave an exact answer to your exact question. And in this exact case my solution is faster. – Thevs Aug 22 '09 at 8:40

I knew I had this proto'd somewhere :)

Array.prototype.init = function(x,n)
{
    if(typeof(n)=='undefined') { n = this.length; }
    while (n--) { this[n] = x; }
    return this;
}

var a = (new Array(5)).init(0);

var b = [].init(0,4);

Edit: tests

In response to Joshua and others methods I ran my own benchmarking, and I'm seeing completely different results to those reported.

Here's what I tested:

//my original method
Array.prototype.init = function(x,n)
{
    if(typeof(n)=='undefined') { n = this.length; }
    while (n--) { this[n] = x; }
    return this;
}

//now using push which I had previously thought to be slower than direct assignment
Array.prototype.init2 = function(x,n)
{
    if(typeof(n)=='undefined') { n = this.length; }
    while (n--) { this.push(x); }
    return this;
}

//joshua's method
function newFilledArray(len, val) {
    var a = [];
    while(len--){
    	a.push(val);
    }
    return a;
}

//test m1 and m2 with short arrays many times 10K * 10

var a = new Date();
for(var i=0; i<10000; i++)
{
    var t1 = [].init(0,10);
}
var A = new Date();

var b = new Date();
for(var i=0; i<10000; i++)
{
    var t2 = [].init2(0,10);
}
var B = new Date();

//test m1 and m2 with long array created once 100K

var c = new Date();
var t3 = [].init(0,100000);
var C = new Date();

var d = new Date();
var t4 = [].init2(0,100000);
var D = new Date();

//test m3 with short array many times 10K * 10

var e = new Date();
for(var i=0; i<10000; i++)
{
    var t5 = newFilledArray(10,0);
}
var E = new Date();

//test m3 with long array created once 100K

var f = new Date();
var t6 = newFilledArray(100000, 0)
var F = new Date();

Results:

IE7 deltas:
dA=156
dB=359
dC=125
dD=375
dE=468
dF=412

FF3.5 deltas:
dA=6
dB=13
dC=63
dD=8
dE=12
dF=8

So by my reckoning push is indeed slower generally but performs better with longer arrays in FF but worse in IE which just sucks in general (quel surprise).

share|improve this answer
    
I've just tested this out: the second method (b = []...) is 10-15% faster than the first, but it's more than 10 times slower than Joshua's answer. – nickf Aug 21 '09 at 8:27
    
I know this is an ancient post. But maybe it is still of interest to others (like me). Therefore I would like to suggest an adition to the prototype function: include an else {this.length=n;} after the this.length-check. This will shorten an already existing array if necessary when re-init-ialising it to a different length n. – cars10 Aug 25 '15 at 7:42

I have nothing against:

Array.apply(null, Array(5)).map(Number.prototype.valueOf,0);
new Array(5+1).join('0').split('').map(parseFloat);

suggested by Zertosh, but in a new ES6 array extensions allow you to do this natively with fill method. Now IE edge, Chrome and FF supports it, but check the compatibility table

new Array(3).fill(0) will give you [0, 0, 0]. You can fill the array with any value like new Array(5).fill('abc') (even objects and other arrays).

On top of that you can modify previous arrays with fill:

arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
arr.fill(9, 3, 5)  # what to fill, start, end

which gives you: [1, 2, 3, 9, 9, 6]

share|improve this answer

It might be worth pointing out, that Array.prototype.fill had been added as part of the ECMAScript 6 (Harmony) proposal. I would rather go with the polyfill written below, before considering other options mentioned on the thread.

if (!Array.prototype.fill) {
  Array.prototype.fill = function(value) {

    // Steps 1-2.
    if (this == null) {
      throw new TypeError('this is null or not defined');
    }

    var O = Object(this);

    // Steps 3-5.
    var len = O.length >>> 0;

    // Steps 6-7.
    var start = arguments[1];
    var relativeStart = start >> 0;

    // Step 8.
    var k = relativeStart < 0 ?
      Math.max(len + relativeStart, 0) :
      Math.min(relativeStart, len);

    // Steps 9-10.
    var end = arguments[2];
    var relativeEnd = end === undefined ?
      len : end >> 0;

    // Step 11.
    var final = relativeEnd < 0 ?
      Math.max(len + relativeEnd, 0) :
      Math.min(relativeEnd, len);

    // Step 12.
    while (k < final) {
      O[k] = value;
      k++;
    }

    // Step 13.
    return O;
  };
}
share|improve this answer

Here is another way to do it using ES6 that nobody has mentioned so far:

> Array.from(Array(3), () => 0)
< [0, 0, 0]

It works by passing a map function as the second parameter of Array.from.

I really like Array(len).fill(0) better, but you can't use it if you need to fill it with computed values instead. For instance, if you need an array of random numbers:

> Array.from(Array(10), () => Math.round(10 * Math.random()));
< [3, 6, 8, 1, 10, 3, 0, 6, 7, 1]

It's more concise than the equivalent:

let numbers = Array(10);
for (let i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
    numbers[i] = Math.round(10 * Math.random());
}
share|improve this answer

The fastest way to do that is with forEach =)

(we keep backward compatibility for IE < 9)

var fillArray = Array.prototype.forEach
    ? function(arr, n) {
         arr.forEach(function(_, index) { arr[index] = n; });
         return arr;
      }
    : function(arr, n) {
         var len = arr.length;
         arr.length = 0;
         while(len--) arr.push(n);
         return arr;
      };

// test
fillArray([1,2,3], 'X'); // => ['X', 'X', 'X']
share|improve this answer
1  
That could be faster (I haven't checked), but it only works if the array already has values in it because forEach only loops over elements that have been set. So fillArray(new Array(100), 'X') won't do anything. The fallback code for IE works in either case. – Matthew Crumley Oct 11 '11 at 17:08
    
It is not correct answer as the problem is that we DO NOT HAVE array yet. We have to make it and prepare it. Your answer uses already made array. I tested some algorithm with array of 100e6 items. Calculations was not easy but even that, preparing array from nothing takes the most time in that algorithm (80%). – MrHIDEn Aug 14 '15 at 16:18

There's always the phpjs solution, which you can find here:

http://phpjs.org/functions/array_fill/

I can't speak for the project (creating a library of javascript functions that mirrors the greater functionality of php) as a whole, but the few functions that I've personally pulled from there have worked like a champ.

share|improve this answer
1  
Adding a code sample would be useful – Mifeet May 24 '13 at 21:48

I just use :

var arr = [10];
for (var i=0; i<=arr.length;arr[i] = i, i++);
share|improve this answer
    
Code seems broken, didn't you mean something like for(var i=0, arr=[]; i<10; arr[i]=0, i++);? – bryc Jan 31 '15 at 17:58

You can check if index exist or not exist, in order to append +1 to it.

this way you don't need a zeros filled array.

EXAMPLE:

var current_year = new Date().getFullYear();
var ages_array = new Array();

for (var i in data) {
    if(data[i]['BirthDate'] != null && data[i]['BirthDate'] != '0000-00-00'){

        var birth = new Date(data[i]['BirthDate']);
        var birth_year = birth.getFullYear();
        var age = current_year - birth_year;

        if(ages_array[age] == null){
            ages_array[age] = 1;
        }else{
            ages_array[age] += 1;
        }

    }
}

console.log(ages_array);
share|improve this answer
    
Capitalization might be seen as "shouting", maybe you can edit it? – bummi Nov 5 '13 at 11:41

What everyone else seems to be missing is setting the length of the array beforehand so that the interpreter isn't constantly changing the size of the array.

My simple one-liner would be Array.prototype.slice.apply(new Uint8Array(length))

But if I were to create a function to do it fast without some hacky workaround, I would probably write a function like this:

var filledArray = function(value, l) {
    var i = 0, a = []; a.length = l;
    while(i<l) a[i++] = value;
    return a;
    }
share|improve this answer

Shortest for loop code

a=i=[];for(;i<100;)a[i++]=0;

Safe var version

var a=[],i=0;for(;i<100;)a[i++]=0;
share|improve this answer

Another nice option found here http://www.2ality.com/2013/11/initializing-arrays.html

function fillArrayWithNumbers(n) {
  var arr = Array.apply(null, Array(n));
  return arr.map(function (x, i) { return i });
}
share|improve this answer
    
This answer was already provided in the first answer. – royhowie Jul 29 '15 at 23:25

Anonymous function:

(function(n) { while(n-- && this.push(0)); return this; }).call([], 5);
// => [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]

A bit shorter with for-loop:

(function(n) { for(;n--;this.push(0)); return this; }).call([], 5);
// => [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]

Works with any Object, just change what's inside this.push().

You can even save the function:

function fill(size, content) {
  for(;size--;this.push(content));
  return this;
}

Call it using:

var helloArray = fill.call([], 5, 'hello');
// => ['hello', 'hello', 'hello', 'hello', 'hello']

Adding elements to an already existing array:

var helloWorldArray = fill.call(helloArray, 5, 'world');
// => ['hello', 'hello', 'hello', 'hello', 'hello', 'world', 'world', 'world', 'world', 'world']

Performance: http://jsperf.com/zero-filled-array-creation/25

share|improve this answer

return Array( quantity ).fill(1).map( n => return n * Math.abs(~~(Math.random() * (1000 - 1 + 1)) + 1) );

One line.

share|improve this answer

protected by Josh Crozier Mar 26 '14 at 1:29

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