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The Wikipedia article on TCP indicates that the IP packets transporting TCP segments can sometimes go lost, and that TCP "requests retransmission of lost data".

What exactly are the rules for requesting retransmission of lost data? At what time frequency are the retransmission requests performed? Is there an upper bound on the number? Is there functionality for the client to indicate to the server to forget about the whole TCP segment for which part went missing when the IP packet went missing?

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usually the retransmission time = round trip time * some constant, and a fixed delay (which is quite pessimistic) for the syn packet. –  Jan Dvorak Oct 18 '12 at 14:17
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up vote 6 down vote accepted

What exactly are the rules for requesting retransmission of lost data?

The receiver does not request the retransmission. The sender waits for an ACK for the byte-range sent to the client and when not received, resends the packets, after a particular interval. This is ARQ (Automatic Repeat reQuest). There are several ways in which this is implemented.

Stop-and-wait ARQ
Go-Back-N ARQ
Selective Repeat ARQ

are detailed in the RFC 3366.

At what time frequency are the retransmission requests performed?

The retransmissions-times and the number of attempts isn't enforced by the standard. It is implemented differently by different operating systems, but the methodology is fixed. (One of the ways to fingerprint OSs perhaps?)

The timeouts are measured in terms of the RTT (Round Trip Time) times. But this isn't needed very often due to Fast-retransmit which kicks in when 3 Duplicate ACKs are received.

Is there an upper bound on the number?

Yes there is. After a certain number of retries, the host is considered to be "down" and the sender gives up and tears down the TCP connection.

Is there functionality for the client to indicate to the server to forget about the whole TCP segment for which part went missing when the IP packet went missing?

The whole point is reliable communication. If you wanted the client to forget about some part, you wouldn't be using TCP in the first place. (UDP perhaps?)

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I know this isn't given as an explicit formula upfront. But I do believe this may be a better source than the Wikipedia article.

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The RFCs are the only normative references. Everything else isn't. –  EJP Oct 18 '12 at 20:55
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@EJP You are of course absolutely correct. However that does not mean that more tractable expositions have no value. –  DuncanACoulter Oct 19 '12 at 13:54
    
+1 for use of "tractable" –  Fls'Zen May 10 '13 at 12:01
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There's no fixed time for retransmission. Simple implementations estimate the RTT (round-trip-time) and if no ACK to send data has been received in 2x that time then they re-send.

They then double the wait-time and re-send once more if again there is no reply. Rinse. Repeat.

More sophisticated systems make better estimates of how long it should take for the ACK as well as guesses about exactly which data has been lost.

The bottom-line is that there is no hard-and-fast rule about exactly when to retransmit. It's up to the implementation. All retransmissions are triggered solely by the sender based on lack of response from the receiver.

TCP never drops data so no, there is no way to indicate a server should forget about some segment.

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"guesses about exactly which data has been lost" SACK (selective acknowledge) is not guessing. I hope you don't mean SACK. –  Jan Dvorak Oct 18 '12 at 14:21
    
The receiver may re-ACK previous data when an out-of-order segment has been received. This hints to the sender that some but not all of the pending packets have been lost and so the sender may choose to retransmit only a subset of what is in its outgoing window (and thus result in a smaller network packet and less overall bandwidth use) rather than sending a bigger packet that includes data previously sent in a later packet (which would otherwise reduce latency and the number of packets sent in the case of multiple losses). There is no certainty, so let's call it an "educated guess". –  Brian White Oct 18 '12 at 14:32
    
see SACK. It is an additional header that tells the sender exactly what the receiver has. I believe nearly all contemporary TCP stacks implement SACK nowadays –  Jan Dvorak Oct 18 '12 at 14:35
    
Yeah, there are a lot of TCP extensions to help. Most of my work has been on bare-bones implementations (no extensions at all) on tiny embedded systems. –  Brian White Oct 18 '12 at 15:14
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