Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a task in perl in which I need to execute 'some_code' but only if date is older than 24 hours counting from now. I'm trying the below code but it doesn't seems to be working.

sub function {

  use Date::Manip::Date
  use Date::Parse
  use Date::Format;

  my $yesterday = time() - 60*60*24;
  my $x = shift;
  my $env = shift;

  $env->{some_code} = 1 if $x < $yesterday;

 return $x;
} 

Any help appreciated.

share|improve this question
3  
Please provide example $x value, actual output and expected output. –  January Oct 18 '12 at 14:23
2  
use-ing the modules is not enough, these modules provide functions which you must apply to perform the date calculations. –  Joel Berger Oct 18 '12 at 14:40
    
What kinds of values can $x have? Where do you get them from before you call the function? Are they Unix time values (seconds since 1970) like the return value of time()? –  gpvos Oct 18 '12 at 14:43

2 Answers 2

You can do it easily, only using core functions.

#!/usr/bin/perl                                                                                   

use strict;

my $new_time   = 1350570164; # 2012-10-18 14:22:44
my $older_time = 1350450164; # 2012-10-17 05:02:44

printf "time in sec: %d older that 24 hours: %d\n", $new_time, is_time_older_24($new_time);
printf "time in sec: %d older than 24 hours: %d\n", $older_time, is_time_older_24($older_time);

sub is_time_older_24 {
    my $given_time = shift;

    my $yesterday_time = time() - 60 * 60 * 24;
    return $given_time <= $yesterday_time
            ? 1
            : 0;
}

Output:

time in sec: 1350570164 older that 24 hours: 0
time in sec: 1350450164 older than 24 hours: 1
share|improve this answer
1  
This works generally, but is not exact. Using the Date/Time modules accounts for things like leap seconds, etc. If "close" is good enough, then this is fine, if you need precision, use a module. –  Joel Berger Oct 18 '12 at 14:38
    
@Joel Berger, that was my first thought too, but the specs call for 24 hours, not one day. –  ikegami Oct 18 '12 at 14:57
    
@ikegami in a mission-critical situation I think I would still rather trust that to a module, however, yeah, 24 hours is generally easier than a day. –  Joel Berger Oct 18 '12 at 15:03
#! /usr/bin/env perl
use Modern::Perl;
use Data::Dumper;
use DateTime;

my $now = DateTime->new( 
                    year => 2012, month => 10, day => 18, 
                    hour => 17, minute => 30, 
                    time_zone => 'UTC'
                );
# my $now = DateTime->now(time_zone => 'UTC');

my $last_run = DateTime->new(
                    year => 2012, month => 10, day => 17, 
                    hour => 19, minute => 30, 
                    time_zone => 'UTC'
                );

my $duration= $now->subtract_datetime($last_run);
say "hours: " . $duration->hours;

Result:

hours: 22

see also:

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.