Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
public class test {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

        final int num = 111;

        new Thread() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                num = 222;
            }
        }.start();

    }
}

I want to change the value of num however I can only do that if I set it to final which would not let me modify this. In other languages such as C we can use pointers but Java cannot?

share|improve this question
    
As a standard workaround, use final int[] num = {111}; and num[0] = 222;. – Marko Topolnik Oct 18 '12 at 14:37
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Java has neither closure nor pointers.

A solution would be to make the num static in the class :

public class test {
    static int num = 111;
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        new Thread() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                num = 222;
            }
        }.start();
    }
}

Another solution would be to use an object like AtomicInteger. You can't change the value of the variable but you can change the content of the value :

public class test {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        final AtomicInteger num = new AtomicInteger(111);
        new Thread() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                num.set(222);
            }
        }.start();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought Java7 was planned to have closures? – Jan Dvorak Oct 18 '12 at 14:46
    
Last time I checked, this was supposed to be in Java 8. – Denys Séguret Oct 18 '12 at 14:47

Why this isn't allowed

main is a method. As with other programming languages, when a method returns, all of the variables declared in its body go out of scope, and accessing them has undefined behavior. Under some circumstances, the memory location where they used to be will no longer be valid.

Obviously this is a problem. If you try to change num after main has returned, you might overwrite a portion of the stack that doesn't belong to num anymore. Java's response to this difficult situation is to introduce restrictions on how you can share variables: they must be final. Java can then safely locate them in such a way that reading them will produce consistent results even after the function has returned.

The C equivalent to this problem is storing and using the address of a local variable outside of its scope, something that all C programmers are taught to never do.

To get around it, declare num as a member of test, create an instance, and pass that to it. This removes the dependancy on a local variable, and thus removes the final restriction.

public class test
{
    int num = 111;

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
    {
        test t = new test();
        (new Thread(t) {
            test mytest;
            Thread(test t)
            {
                mytest = t;
            }

            @Override
            public void run() {
                mytest.num = 222;
            }
        }).start();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't exist in a static context. You'd have to create an instance of Test. -1 – Jan Dvorak Oct 18 '12 at 14:42
    
@JanDvorak: I realized that and drastically changed my answer. – Wug Oct 18 '12 at 14:48
    
clarification needed: "Java can then safely locate them in such a way" means copying them to every inner class that uses them. That's why they cannot be changed later. – Jan Dvorak Oct 18 '12 at 14:51

Well, you can access it if you declare variable outside the function. Like this:

public class test {

private static int num = 111;

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

        new Thread() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                num = 222;
            }
        }.start();

    }
}
share|improve this answer

You are creating new Thread() { class as inner class. You can't access outer class variables without declaring them as final.

You can't change final variable references.

There are two ways you can do this,

1) Make num as static

2) Wrap num inside an object (You can update state of the object even though you define reference as final).

NOTE: Both are not thread safe.

share|improve this answer

Yep you can't win here! You need to set it final to be able to access it, but then you will not be able to modify it. You'll need to look at a different approach.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this... a feature of Java? – user1753100 Oct 18 '12 at 14:38
1  
Not a constructive answer. – Jan Dvorak Oct 18 '12 at 14:43
1  
It is a feature yes. Explained well here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4732544/… – Brian Oct 18 '12 at 14:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.