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I have a form with multiple checkboxes, which I want to put into an array. I go by the example provided here: http://www.kavoir.com/2009/01/php-checkbox-array-in-form-handling-multiple-checkbox-values-in-an-array.html

So I've prepared the files:

checkboxes.php:

<form action="checkboxes2.php" method="post">
<input type="checkbox" name="tags[]" value="1" />1<br>
<input type="checkbox" name="tags[]" value="2" />2<br>
<input type="checkbox" name="tags[]" value="3" />3<br>
<input type="checkbox" name="tags[]" value="4" />4<br>
<input type="submit" value="Send" />
</form>

checkboxes2.php:

<?php
print_r($_POST["tags"]);
?>

Pretty simple...I realize I should only get the value of these textboxes and not if they have been selected or not. But I still get this error:

Undefined index: tags in checkboxes2.php on line 2

I have absolutely no idea what I did wrong here. I went by the example in the link above and did everything exactly the same (mainly copy/pasting and changing some parts like adding a submit button) but I don't get the output as shown in the example. I should at least get the values of each of these checkboxes, right?

What I want to do: I want to check the array of checkboxes, see which ones have been selected and add "yes" or "no" into a second array, like this:

<?php
  $number1 = $_POST["tags"];
  $number2 = array();

  foreach($number1 as $number1_output)
  {
    if(isset($number1_output))
    {
      $number2[] = "yes";
    }
    else
    {
      $number2[] = "no";
    }
  }

  print_r($number2);
?>

Well...it only half works. Only the checkboxes that have been selected are added to the array. So if I select "3" and "4" I get this:

Array ( [0] => yes [1] => yes )

What is the best way to deal with checkboxes in arrays and validating them?

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This is how checkboxes are working , only if you select them the value pass. (as far as i know) –  Ofir Baruch Oct 18 '12 at 14:53
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Alternatively, if you want to have checkboxes that also send a value if they are not checked, you can add a Hidden input field before the checkbox:

<input type="hidden" name="tag[1]" value="off" />
<input type="checkbox" name="tag[1]" value="on />

Because the checkbox is only sent if it is set, but it overrides the hidden as it is later in the HTML, you will now always have tag[1] set with either 'off' or 'on' depending on whether or not the box was checked.

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Thank you! That was exactly what I was looking for. Now I always get a value, no matter if the checkbox has been selected or not. Many tnx! –  noClue Oct 18 '12 at 15:15
    
Wonder about browser compatibility on this as well as the serialize function in JS... I would suggest a JS on client side that checks if a checkbox if checked, and if it is not then creates an hidden input (let's call it no_tags) and sends it with the submit function, your PHP code then will have 2 vars to check: var_dump($_POST['tags']); and var_dump($_POST['no_tags']); –  Fabrizio Oct 18 '12 at 15:23
    
Browser compatibility won't be an issue. I just needed this for a website that only I use. But still, I will keep your advice in mind if I ever use it on a more open website (which I probably will someday). –  noClue Oct 18 '12 at 15:52
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Checkboxes which are not selected to do not send anything when the form submits. That means if NONE of those tags checkboxes are selected, there will be no tags attribute in the $_POST array.

As such, your code should be

<?
if ($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] == 'POST') {
   if (isset($_POST['tags'])) {
      print_r($_POST['tags']);
   }
}
?>

The first line verifies that a POST has actually taken place, and the second line verifies that there's actually any data to dump out.

For the rest of your code, the isset is rather pointless... Since a checkbox is only present in the POST data if it was selected, there's no point in doing the isset() within your foreach loop - there'd be nothing to foreach on if there were no checkboxes, so by definition everything in the foreach will be isset() == true anyways.

As such, your foreach loop will only produce yes values, never a no.

A better workaround is to specify array keys within your form:

<input type="checkbox" name="tags[1]" value="1" />
<input type="checkbox" name="tags[2]" value="2" />
etc...

then have

<?php
if (b blah blah blah verify post stuff) {
    for ($i = 1; $i <= $max_tags_allowed; $i++) {
      if (isset($_POST['tags'][$i])) {
          $message2[] = 'yes';
      } else {
          $message2[] = 'no';
      }
    }
}
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Gah, you're too fast. Was writing the exact same thing. –  KevinM1 Oct 18 '12 at 14:58
    
the classic solution is to add a hidden input to the array so that it always exists. –  Jan Dvorak Oct 18 '12 at 15:00
    
@Marc, seems like the OP wants to track the keys, so $message2[$i] = 'yes'; and $message2[$i] = 'no'; –  Teena Thomas Oct 18 '12 at 15:01
    
@coder: which'd beg the question of why not simply use the tags[1] type notation with value="yes". if it's not set, then it's a "no". –  Marc B Oct 18 '12 at 15:02
    
yes, did think about it, not completely sure, what the OP really wants. –  Teena Thomas Oct 18 '12 at 15:06
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First create an array that holds "no" with all the possible keys, like this:

$no = array(0 => "no", 1 => "no"); // or array("no", "no");

Then you can get your desired array like that:

$checkValues = array_flip($_POST["tags"]) + $no;

This way the values in $_POST["tags"] will become keys, and the + operator merges the two array keeping the keys, also omitting values from the second array, if they are present in the first array. This way you can just check like this:

$fourthChecked = $checkValues[4] !== "no";

I thought its much simpler than the other answers. Good luck!

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In your checkboxes.php:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1" />
<title>My form</title>
<script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" languaje="javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
  $('.checkbox').click(function(){
    var values="";
    $('.checkbox:checked').each(function(index) {           
        values+=$(this).val();
        $('#tagsVal').val(values);
    });
  });
});
</script>
</head>
<body>
  <form action="checkboxes2.php" method="post">
   <input type="checkbox" name="tags1" value="1" class="checkbox"/>1<br><!--Notice the class="checkbox" attribute is important for the jquery function-->
   <input type="checkbox" name="tags2" value="2" class="checkbox"/>2<br>
   <input type="checkbox" name="tags3" value="3" class="checkbox"/>3<br>
   <input type="checkbox" name="tags4" value="4" class="checkbox"/>4<br>
   <input type="hidden" name="tagsVal" id="tagsVal" value="" />
   <input type="submit" value="Send" />
  </form>
</body>
</html>

So what you'll get in your $_POST['tagVal'] you'll get your values. If checkbox 1,3 and 4 are checked you'll get a string 134. In your checkboxes2.php you'll only have to split the string into array if you need it.

$arr1 = str_split($_POST['tagVal']);

Regards Luis

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