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In order to learn more about testing, we're going to use a profiler on a larger project (to actually get some values and measurements) and since we don't have any large project ourselves, we're forced to use something else. Any good suggestions? Maybe testing JUnit perhaps? (not "With" JUnit)?

Edit: Not looking for any specific data, just... something... The problem is that all of this is so new so it gets kinda confusing. The point is to get slightly accustomed to testing tools such as a profiler. In other words, there shouldn't be too necessary to know much about the actual program since the program don't really matter and the data gained isn't too significant either and is mostly supposed to merely demonstrate that you can actually get stuff out of testing. So it's a bit confusing how I should proceed since I am not used to big actual programs.

Can I just download normal java files and just run/profile them with NetBeans (or similar) without having to do or care about a bunch of stuff?

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2 Answers 2

Well, I've got my standard scenario. It's in C++, but it shouldn't take more than a day or two to recode it in Java. Caveat: The scenario is not about measuring, per se, but about performance tuning, which is not at all the same thing.

It makes the point that serious code often contains multiple performance problems, and if you're really trying to make it go fast, profilers are not necessarily the best tools.

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It depends on what type of data you want to profile. But the best way to get a "larger project" if you don't have one, is to find some open source project on the web that fit with what you want.

Edit: I never profile with NetBeans, so I can't tell you for this tool, but if you don't care about the tool, you can start trying with VisualVM (included with the JDK), it's a tool for monitoring the JVM. It's very usefull, and if you already run java application (like NetBeans) you'll not need to download extra applications.

Description of the tool taken on their website: VisualVM monitors application CPU usage, GC activity, heap and permanent generation memory, number of loaded classes and running threads.

VisualVM website

If you really want to profile with some source code, a little java application with a main will do the job, but again it depends on what data/amout of data you want to profile. Maybe you can find some "test applications" written in java on the web.

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No specific data really, just... something... The problem is that all of this is so new so it gets kinda confusing. The point is to get slightly accustomed to testing tools such as a profiler. In other words, there shouldn't be too necessary to know much about the actual program since the program don't really matter and the data gained isn't too significant either and is mostly supposed to merely demonstrate that you can actually get stuff out of testing. So it's a bit confusing how I should proceed since I am not used to big actual programs. –  Deragon Oct 18 '12 at 22:13

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