Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Possible Duplicate:
How may I reference the script tag that loaded the currently-executing script?
Can you select the script element that included the JavaScript?

Is there any identifyScript that could make this work? jQuery is cool too.:

<script type="text/javascript" id="script1">
    function identifyScript(){...}
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" id="script1">
    identifyScript(); //This function would alert "script1"
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" id="script2">
    identifyScript(); //This function would alert "script2"
</script>
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by zzzzBov, lonesomeday, jeremyharris, jbabey, Felix Kling Oct 18 '12 at 15:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
No, that isn't possible directly, though you could use document.write to create an element right after the script that you can target from within the script, as long as it gets ran during the initial page rendering. – Kevin B Oct 18 '12 at 15:34
1  
Why do you need to do this? Perhaps there is a more direct way of acomplish your objective. – hugomg Oct 18 '12 at 15:34
    
@missingno, this is one of those features that would just be nice to have. Plugin configuration could move to attributes on the including script. – zzzzBov Oct 18 '12 at 15:36
    
@zzzzBov the nail on the head. It would be easy to hand some code off to a client with <script color="red" message="hello world"></script> – Aakil Fernandes Oct 18 '12 at 15:38
    
@zzzzBov, yes its a duplicate. How do I close? – Aakil Fernandes Oct 18 '12 at 15:38
up vote 5 down vote accepted

As long as it is guaranteed that the script files are getting loaded sequentially (which means, not asyncronously), you can call the following code within each javascript file:

var scripts        = document.getElementsByTagName( 'script' ),
    lastTag        = scripts[ scripts.length - 1 ];

alert( lastTag.id );

However, this concept breaks as soon as there is an async or defer attribute within those <script> elements. Each of these attributes allows the browser to delay the loading of scripts and order is no longer guaranteed.

But if you're loading your files without any async flags, this will work just fine because each script accesses the last inserted <script> node, which must be the one it was loaded from.

share|improve this answer
<script type="text/javascript">
    function identifyScript() {
        scripts = document.getElementsByTagName("script");
        alert(scripts[scripts.length - 1].id);
    }
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" id="script1">
    identifyScript(); //This function would alert "script1"
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" id="script2">
    identifyScript(); //This function would alert "script2"
</script>

This works because at the time it's run in each block, that block is the last one to exist so is the last one in the collection.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.