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To state the obvious, jQuery is great for beginners as it helps us write less code but it requires a large file to be referenced. I presume there is no tool to convert code written in jQuery to vanilla JavaScript. What is a good way to leverage my knowledge of jQuery to quickly write/generate vanilla JavaScript for complex scenarios?

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closed as too localized by Tim Post Oct 18 '12 at 15:46

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jQuery does not "generate" Javascript. It is a library: you ask it to do something complex, and it does it, just like your own JS functions do not generate Javascript, but simply perform tasks. –  lanzz Oct 18 '12 at 15:35
    
Umm .. jQuery is written in Javascript. Did you mean to ask about TypeScript or something? –  Tim Post Oct 18 '12 at 15:46
    
I should have framed my question better. I understand jQuery is JavaScript. To take another shot at phrasing my question, I wanted to find a way to look at the Javascript that jQuery "renders" or automagically "generates". Thanks for all the answers. Vega, jholloman, Christoph have read my mind and I will follow their tips to use jQuery Source Viewer tool & to 'turn debugmode on in the browser and have a look which functions get called and what the exactly do'. –  mvark Oct 19 '12 at 7:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

jQuery is a library, a collection of functions that helps to do complex stuffs simpler.

The code written in jQuery is plain vanilla javascript. You can look at their uncompressed source code

For starters, you can use this site jQuery Source Viewer to browser through any specific functions.

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I also found the jQuery Annotated Source on GitHub to be useful - robflaherty.github.io/jquery-annotated-source –  mvark Apr 28 '13 at 7:24

jQuery is vanilla JavaScript. There's no translation or code generation that is done. You're just calling functions. If you want to know what those functions do, pull down the un-minified code and look at the functions that you're interested in.

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You can always read the jQuery source:

http://james.padolsey.com/jquery/

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JQuery is just a wrapper - it has a lot of functions which are written in plain javascript, so what you can do is:

  1. Dig into the jquery sources and have a look at the functions to see what they are doing.

  2. Turn debugmode on in the browser and have a look which functions get called and what the exactly do.

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jQuery doesn't generate javascript, jQuery IS javascript. There is no easy way to automagically convert it to vanilla javascript, because it is vanilla javascript.

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Well you can just have a look into the development file of the current version: http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.8.2.js

But as some here already said: jQuery doesn't generate any Javascript. jQuery is a library, written in Javascript.

A good way to leverage your knowledge of jQuery to quickly write vanilla Javascript is to actually use jQuery. jQuery is famous because it abstracts a lot away and makes tasks easy which would have been painful in plain javascript.

IMHO also learn something about closures, functions (and their odds in JS) and scopes in javascript. That will give you a far more solid knowledge of javascript than the most people on the net have. And the more you know how JS actually works the better your code will be.

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