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Is it possible to add and multiply the count of different tables where the id is the same? Imagine:

Table_1       Table_2    Table_3
id            id         id
1             1          1
1             2          2
2             2          3
3             2          3
3             2          3
3             3          3

So that the end result would be this table with 2 columns:

id        (COUNT(Table_1.id) + 2*COUNT(Table_2.id) + 3*COUNT(Table_3.id))
1                                   7
2                                   12
3                                   17
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know if I understood you correctly but give this a try,

SELECT a.ID,
       a.aa + (2 * b.bb) + (3 * c.cc)
FROM
  (
    SELECT ID, COUNT(*) aa
    FROM table1
    GROUP BY ID
  ) a LEFT JOIN
  (
    SELECT ID, COUNT(*) bb
    FROM table2
    GROUP BY ID
  ) b ON a.ID = b.ID
  LEFT JOIN
  (
    SELECT ID, COUNT(*) cc
    FROM table3
    GROUP BY ID
  ) c ON a.ID = c.ID

SQLFiddle Demo

share|improve this answer
    
LEFT JOIN is slow and probably doesn't do any good here. –  AndreKR Oct 19 '12 at 13:49
    
@AndreKR what if records on table1 don't have matches on other tables? it will surely won;t show on the list. –  John Woo Oct 19 '12 at 13:53
    
What if records in Table_3 don't have matches on other tables? –  AndreKR Oct 19 '12 at 13:54
SELECT id, counts_1.number + 2 * counts_2.number + 3 * counts_3.number
FROM
(SELECT id, COUNT(*) AS number FROM Table_1 GROUP BY id) AS counts_1
JOIN
(SELECT id, COUNT(*) AS number FROM Table_2 GROUP BY id) AS counts_2 USING (id)
JOIN
(SELECT id, COUNT(*) AS number FROM Table_3 GROUP BY id) AS counts_3 USING (id)

Note that this solution requires that every id exists at least once in each of the tables, otherwise it will be left out of the result. Changing this would require a FULL OUTER JOIN that MySQL is incapable of. There are ways around that limitation, though.

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