Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am brand new to python (and programming in general) and I am following examples from Python Programming: An Introduction to Computer Science John M. Zelle, Ph.D. Version 1.0rc2 Fall 2002 Obviously this is quite a bit out of date and I am using Python 3.3 I am typing in the exercise exactly as the book shows it (adding () around the print statements) but I keep coming up with the error. Here is a copy of what I input and the result when I tried to run the program. What am I doing wrong?

>>> def main():
    print ("This program illustrates a chaotic function.")
    x=input ("Enter a number between 0 and 1:")
    for i in range(10):
        x= 3.9*x*(1-x)
        print (x)


>>> main()
This program illustrates a chaotic function.
Enter a number between 0 and 1:1
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#12>", line 1, in <module>
    main()
  File "<pyshell#11>", line 5, in main
    x= 3.9*x*(1-x)
TypeError: can't multiply sequence by non-int of type 'float'
>>> 
share|improve this question
1  
Well, even if you get the code of this and other examples to work, the book will probably be fraught with old and busted ways of doing things. Get a better, more recent book so you aren't ten years behind everyone else in terms of idioms, language features, libraries, etc. –  delnan Oct 18 '12 at 16:02

1 Answer 1

use x=float(input ("Enter a number between 0 and 1:")) as input() returns a string in python 3k not float:

>>> def main():
...     print ("This program illustrates a chaotic function.")
...     x=float(input ("Enter a number between 0 and 1:"))
...     for i in range(10):
...         x= 3.9*x*(1-x)
...         print (x)
... 
>>> main()
This program illustrates a chaotic function.
Enter a number between 0 and 1:.45
0.96525
0.13081550625
0.443440957341
0.962524191305
0.140678352587
0.47146301943
0.971823998886
0.106790244894
0.372005745109
0.911108135788
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.