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Ok, I know how to check if a certain day is inside the DST-frame. But is there any way to get the information if the system providing the Date-object already IS in DST-mode and you dont know the 'normal' time-zone? A user might turn of that feature or still has to reboot or something like that. Most systems provide some kind of flag in the SysAPI to check that… is there any way to get that info from js?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Probably not.

The JavaScript language (ECMAScript 5th Edition) doesn't provide any such functionality.

You might be able to access it from an extension such as an ActiveXObject but I doubt that there is any reliable, cross-browser/cross-platform way to detect if the OS or user is using any daylight savings time settings.

This Microsoft Technet article demonstrates how you could detect DST on a few versions of Windows using VBScript (which is likely analogous in JScript) but, again, this isn't likely something you could do reliably (if at all, depending on the specifics of your use case).

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hm … so this sounds like my next easy-to-implement-but-never-to-get-implemented feature-request for js… -.- –  rhavin Oct 18 '12 at 16:42
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is there any way to get the information if the system providing the Date-object already IS in DST-mode and you dont know the 'normal' time-zone?

Not sure whether i got the question right. Basically I see only two possibilities:

a) The DST feature is turned off or the timezone has no DST-frame at all: we always know the standard time, since there is no DST time.

b) The DST feature is turned on and a DST-frame exists for the timezone: the UTC-offsets of summer- and winter-solitice are different and the standard offset is that of winter-solistice, which is in december (northern hemisphere) or in june (southern hemisphere).

This should give us the information:

function checkDST() {

  var
    now = new Date();
    year = now.getFullYear(), // current year
    june = new Date(year, 5, 21, 12), // solistice 1
    december = new Date(year, 11, 21, 12); // solistice 2
    decTzo = december.getTimezoneOffset(),
    junTzo = june.getTimezoneOffset(),
    nowTzo = now.getTimezoneOffset(),
    dstDiff = decTzo - junTzo,
    msgNoDst = "Your system does not observe Daylight Savings. UTC offset: " + nowTzo,
    msgDstN = "Northern hemisphere. UTC offset: " + nowTzo + ", standard offset: " + decTzo,
    msgDstS = "Southern hemisphere. UTC offset: " + nowTzo + ", standard offset: " + junTzo;

    if (dstDiff === 0) { return msgNoDst; }
    if (dstDiff > 0) { return msgDstN; }
    return msgDstS;
}

alert(checkDST());

– If the difference in offset dec-jun is positive – e.g. for Berlin -60-(-120) = +60 – then the location is on the northern hemisphere and the standard offset is that of december.
– If the difference in offset dec-jun is negative – e.g. for Adelaide -630-(-570) = -60 – then the location is on the southern hemisphere and the standard offset is that of june.

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