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In order to share some more tips and tricks for R, what is your single-most useful feature or trick? Clever vectorization? Data input/output? Visualization and graphics? Statistical analysis? Special functions? The interactive environment itself?

One item per post, and we will see if we get a winner by means of votes.

[Edit 25-Aug 2008]: So after one week, it seems that the simple str() won the poll. As I like to recommend that one myself, it is an easy answer to accept.

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8  
@Dirk: "community wiki" means "community-owned", its not a synonym for "poll question". Don't listen to the community wiki police. –  Juliet Aug 18 '09 at 19:45
4  
Considering meta.stackexchange.com/questions/11740/… it should be CW. –  dmckee Aug 18 '09 at 21:17
8  
CW bullying again. I'll see your meta-SO and raise you: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/392/… –  ars Aug 19 '09 at 0:41
13  
@ars: its a question that does not have a definite answer. Ergo make it CW. –  dmckee Aug 19 '09 at 1:26
2  
@JD Long hilarious comment. unfortunately it was hidden behind the fold. I mean answering tough R questions doesn't really pay stack-rep wise. So it´s ok to me if guys who set up nice questions that put R on the map finally get some credit. Besides this is certainly more useful the R users than a what´s your favorite C trick question would be to C programmers... –  Matt Bannert Oct 15 '10 at 9:56
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34 Answers 34

up vote 64 down vote accepted

str() tells you the structure of any object.

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10  
Nice, but I wish they had used a different name. –  Frank Feb 14 '10 at 6:59
2  
How does that make more sense? str is short for structure. Normally dir is short for directory. –  hadley Aug 25 '10 at 21:16
17  
Ah, str is also short for string in many languages. –  Hamish Grubijan Aug 26 '10 at 0:24
1  
class() is just a small part of the information that str() displays –  hadley Apr 6 '11 at 17:50
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One very useful function I often use is dput(), which allows you to dump an object in the form of R code.

# Use the iris data set
R> data(iris)
# dput of a numeric vector
R> dput(iris$Petal.Length)
c(1.4, 1.4, 1.3, 1.5, 1.4, 1.7, 1.4, 1.5, 1.4, 1.5, 1.5, 1.6, 
1.4, 1.1, 1.2, 1.5, 1.3, 1.4, 1.7, 1.5, 1.7, 1.5, 1, 1.7, 1.9, 
1.6, 1.6, 1.5, 1.4, 1.6, 1.6, 1.5, 1.5, 1.4, 1.5, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 
1.3, 1.5, 1.3, 1.3, 1.3, 1.6, 1.9, 1.4, 1.6, 1.4, 1.5, 1.4, 4.7, 
4.5, 4.9, 4, 4.6, 4.5, 4.7, 3.3, 4.6, 3.9, 3.5, 4.2, 4, 4.7, 
3.6, 4.4, 4.5, 4.1, 4.5, 3.9, 4.8, 4, 4.9, 4.7, 4.3, 4.4, 4.8, 
5, 4.5, 3.5, 3.8, 3.7, 3.9, 5.1, 4.5, 4.5, 4.7, 4.4, 4.1, 4, 
4.4, 4.6, 4, 3.3, 4.2, 4.2, 4.2, 4.3, 3, 4.1, 6, 5.1, 5.9, 5.6, 
5.8, 6.6, 4.5, 6.3, 5.8, 6.1, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5, 5, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5, 
6.7, 6.9, 5, 5.7, 4.9, 6.7, 4.9, 5.7, 6, 4.8, 4.9, 5.6, 5.8, 
6.1, 6.4, 5.6, 5.1, 5.6, 6.1, 5.6, 5.5, 4.8, 5.4, 5.6, 5.1, 5.1, 
5.9, 5.7, 5.2, 5, 5.2, 5.4, 5.1)
# dput of a factor levels
R> dput(levels(iris$Species))
c("setosa", "versicolor", "virginica")

It can be very useful to post easily reproducible data chunks when you ask for help, or to edit or reorder the levels of a factor.

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head() and tail() to get the first and last parts of a dataframe, vector, matrix, function, etc. Especially with large data frames, this is a quick way to check that it has loaded ok.

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One nice feature: Reading data uses connections which can be local files, remote files accessed via http, pipes from other programs or more.

As a simple example, consider this access for N=10 random integers between min=100 and max=200 from random.org (which supplies true random numbers based on atmospheric noise rather than a pseudo random number generator):

R> site <- "http://random.org/integers/"         # base URL
R> query <- "num=10&min=100&max=200&col=2&base=10&format=plain&rnd=new"
R> txt <- paste(site, query, sep="?")            # concat url and query string
R> nums <- read.table(file=txt)                  # and read the data
R> nums                                          # and show it
   V1  V2
1 165 143
2 107 118
3 103 132
4 191 100
5 138 185
R>

As an aside, the random package provides several convenience functions for accessing random.org.

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1  
It's not gaming the system, just getting things started. He's still free to accept any other answer. –  ars Aug 19 '09 at 0:45
2  
@ars: He's free to accept this one. Nor am I going to attempt to force him to wiki it if he won;t take my advice. But I won't post a prepared selfanswer without marking it wiki, and I won't vote for one without it either. Take that for what it's worth. –  dmckee Aug 19 '09 at 1:28
4  
@Dirk: it is wholly acceptable, even encouraged by Jeff and Joel, to answer your own question. There is NO requirement, not even an informal one, to make your answer CW. You're clearly not gaming the system. Once again, just ignore the community wiki police. –  Juliet Aug 20 '09 at 12:13
8  
I have to agree that part of the sites purpose is to provide best answers for common problems and a general resource. Posing a questions and providing a good answer can help bolster a topic. This is especially useful with new/small tags such as R. –  kpierce8 Aug 21 '09 at 14:42
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I find I am using with() and within() more and more. No more $ littering my code and one doesn't need to start attaching objects to the search path. More seriously, I find with() etc make the intention of my data analysis scripts much clearer.

> df <- data.frame(A = runif(10), B = rnorm(10))
> A <- 1:10 ## something else hanging around...
> with(df, A + B) ## I know this will use A in df!
 [1]  0.04334784 -0.40444686  1.99368816  0.13871605 -1.17734837
 [6]  0.42473812  2.33014226  1.61690799  1.41901860  0.8699079

with() sets up an environment within which the R expression is evaluated. within() does the same thing but allows you to modify the data object used to create the environment.

> df <- within(df, C <- rpois(10, lambda = 2))
> head(df)
           A          B C
1 0.62635571 -0.5830079 1
2 0.04810539 -0.4525522 1
3 0.39706979  1.5966184 3
4 0.95802501 -0.8193090 2
5 0.76772541 -1.9450738 2
6 0.21335006  0.2113881 4

Something I didn't realise when I first used within() is that you have to do an assignment as part of the expression evaluated and assign the returned object (as above) to get the desired effect.

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Data Input trick = RGoogleDocs package

http://www.omegahat.org/RGoogleDocs/

I have found Google spreadsheets to be a fantastic way for all collaborators to be on the same page. Furthermore, Google Forms allows one to capture data from respondents and effortlessly write it to a google spreadsheet. Since data changes frequently and is almost never final it is far preferable for R to read a google spreadsheet directly than to futz with downloading csv files and reading them in.

# Get data from google spreadsheet
library(RGoogleDocs)
ps <-readline(prompt="get the password in ")
auth = getGoogleAuth("me@gmail.com", ps, service="wise")
sheets.con <- getGoogleDocsConnection(auth)
ts2=getWorksheets("Data Collection Repos",sheets.con)
names(ts2)
init.consent <-sheetAsMatrix(ts2$Sheet1,header=TRUE, as.data.frame=TRUE, trim=TRUE)

I cannot rembember which but one or two of the following commands takes several seconds.

  1. getGoogleAuth

  2. getGoogleDocsConnection

  3. getWorksheets

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Use backticks to reference non standard names.

> df <- data.frame(x=rnorm(5),y=runif(5))
> names(df) <- 1:2
> df
           1         2
1 -1.2035003 0.6989573
2 -1.2146266 0.8272276
3  0.3563335 0.0947696
4 -0.4372646 0.9765767
5 -0.9952423 0.6477714
> df$1
Error: unexpected numeric constant in "df$1"
> df$`1`
[1] -1.2035003 -1.2146266  0.3563335 -0.4372646 -0.9952423

In this case, df[,"1"] would also work. But back ticks work inside formulas!

> lm(`2`~`1`,data=df)

Call:
lm(formula = `2` ~ `1`, data = df)

Coefficients:
(Intercept)          `1`  
     0.4087      -0.3440

[Edit] Dirk asks why one would give invalid names? I don't know! But I certainly encounter this problem in practice fairly often. For example, using hadley's reshape package:

> library(reshape)
> df$z <- c(1,1,2,2,2)
> recast(df,z~.,id.var="z")
Aggregation requires fun.aggregate: length used as default
  z (all)
1 1     4
2 2     6
> recast(df,z~.,id.var="z")$(all)
Error: unexpected '(' in "recast(df,z~.,id.var="z")$("
> recast(df,z~.,id.var="z")$`(all)`
Aggregation requires fun.aggregate: length used as default
[1] 4 6
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3  
It's also useful in read.table when check.names is false - i.e. when you want to work with the original column names. –  hadley Aug 24 '09 at 2:23
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Don't know how well known this is/isn't, but something that I've definitely taken advantage of are the pass-by-reference capabilities of environments.

zz <- new.env()
zz$foo <- c(1,2,3,4,5)
changer <- function(blah) {
   blah$foo <- 5
}
changer(zz)
zz$foo

For this example it doesn't make sense why it'd be useful, but if you're passing large objects around it can help.

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My new favorite thing is the foreach library. It lets you do all of the nice apply things, but with a somewhat easier syntax:

list_powers <- foreach(i = 1:100) %do% {
  lp <- x[i]^i
  return (lp)
}

The best part is that if you are doing something that actually requires a significant amount of time, you can switch from %do% to %dopar% (with the appropriate backend library) to instantly parallelize, even across a cluster. Very slick.

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I do a lot of basic manipulation of data, so here are two built-in functions ( transform , subset ) and one library ( sqldf ) that I use daily.

create sample sales data

sales <- expand.grid(country = c('USA', 'UK', 'FR'),
                     product = c(1, 2, 3))
sales$revenue <- rnorm(dim(sales)[1], mean=100, sd=10)

> sales
  country product   revenue
1     USA       1 108.45965
2      UK       1  97.07981
3      FR       1  99.66225
4     USA       2 100.34754
5      UK       2  87.12262
6      FR       2 112.86084
7     USA       3  95.87880
8      UK       3  96.43581
9      FR       3  94.59259

use transform() to add a column

## transform currency to euros
usd2eur <- 1.434
transform(sales, euro = revenue * usd2eur)

>
  country product   revenue     euro
1     USA       1 108.45965 155.5311
2      UK       1  97.07981 139.2125
3      FR       1  99.66225 142.9157
...

use subset() to slice the data

subset(sales, 
       country == 'USA' & product %in% c(1, 2), 
       select = c('product', 'revenue'))

>
  product  revenue
1       1 108.4597
4       2 100.3475

use sqldf() to slice and aggregate with SQL

The sqldf package provides an SQL interface to R data frames

##  recast the previous subset() expression in SQL
sqldf('SELECT product, revenue FROM sales \
       WHERE country = "USA" \
       AND product IN (1,2)')

>
  product  revenue
1       1 108.4597
2       2 100.3475

Perform an aggregation or GROUP BY

sqldf('select country, sum(revenue) revenue \ 
       FROM sales \
       GROUP BY country')

>
  country  revenue
1      FR 307.1157
2      UK 280.6382
3     USA 304.6860

For more sophisticated map-reduce-like functionality on data frames, check out the plyr package. And if find yourself wanting to pull your hair out, I recommend checking out Data Manipulation with R.

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?ave

Subsets of 'x[]' are averaged, where each subset consist of those observations with the same factor levels. Usage: ave(x, ..., FUN = mean)

I use it all the time. (e.g. in this answer here at so)

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1  
@Tomas ave preserves ordering and length. so you can, for example, add a vector of group means to a dataset, in one step. –  Eduardo Leoni Jul 24 '11 at 0:19
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A way to speed up code and eliminate for loops.

instead of for loops that loop through a dataframe looking for values. just take a subset of the df with those values, much quicker.

so instead of:

for(i in 1:nrow(df)){
  if (df$column[i] == x) {
    df$column2[i] <- y
    or any other similiar code
  }
}

do something like this:

df$column2[df$column1 == x] <- y

that base concept is applicable extremely often and is a great way to get rid of for loops

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11  
There is a small trap here that used to catch me up all the time. If df$column1 contains NA values, subsetting using == will pull out any values that equal x and any NAs. To avoid this, use "%in%" instead of "==". –  Matt Parker Aug 21 '09 at 15:03
2  
You mean na.omit? ;) –  hadley Aug 23 '09 at 23:21
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Sometimes you need to rbind multiple data frames. do.call() will let you do that (someone had to explain this to me when bind I asked this question, as it doesn't appear to be an obvious use).

foo <- list()

foo[[1]] <- data.frame(a=1:5, b=11:15)
foo[[2]] <- data.frame(a=101:105, b=111:115)
foo[[3]] <- data.frame(a=200:210, b=300:310)

do.call(rbind, foo)
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In R programming (not interactive sessions), I use if (bad.condition) stop("message") a lot. Every function starts with a few of these, and as I work through computations, I pepper these in, too. I guess I got into the habit from using assert() in C. The benefits are two-fold. First, it's a lot faster to get working code with these checks in place. Second, and probably more important, it is a lot easier to work with existing code when you see these checks on every screen in your editor. You won't have to wonder whether x>0, or trust a comment stating that it is ... you'll know, from a glance, that it is.

PS. my first post here. Be gentle!

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12  
Not a bad habit, and R offers yet another way: stopfifnot(!bad.condition) which is more concise. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jun 5 '10 at 20:54
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The traceback() function is a must when you have an error somewhere and do not understand it readily. It will print a trace of the stack, very helpful as R is not very verbose by default.

Then setting options(error=recover) will allow you to "enter" into the function raising the error and try and understand what happens exactly, as if you had full control over it and could put a browser() in it.

These three functions can really help debugging your code.

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1  
options(error=recover) is my favorite debugging method. –  Joshua Ulrich Aug 3 '10 at 11:57
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I'm really surprised no one has posted about apply, tapply, lapply, and sapply. A general rule I use when doing stuff in R is that if I have a for loop that is doing data processing or simulations, I try to factor it out and replace it with an *apply. Some people shy away from the *apply functions because they think only single parameter functions can be passed in. Nothing could be further from the truth! Like passing around functions with parameters as first class objects in Javascript, you do this in R with anonymous functions. For example:

 > sapply(rnorm(100, 0, 1), round)
  [1]  1  1  0  1  1 -1 -2  0  2  2 -2 -1  0  1 -1  0  1 -1  0 -1  0  0  0  0  0
 [26]  2  0 -1 -2  0  0  1 -1  1  5  1 -1  0  1  1  1  2  0 -1  1 -1  1  0 -1  1
 [51]  2  1  1 -2 -1  0 -1  2 -1  1 -1  1 -1  0 -1 -2  1  1  0 -1 -1  1  1  2  0
 [76]  0  0  0 -2 -1  1  1 -2  1 -1  1  1  1  0  0  0 -1 -3  0 -1  0  0  0  1  1


> sapply(rnorm(100, 0, 1), round(x, 2)) # How can we pass a parameter?
Error in match.fun(FUN) : object 'x' not found


# Wrap your function call in an anonymous function to use parameters
> sapply(rnorm(100, 0, 1), function(x) {round(x, 2)})
  [1] -0.05 -1.74 -0.09 -1.23  0.69 -1.43  0.76  0.55  0.96 -0.47 -0.81 -0.47
 [13]  0.27  0.32  0.47 -1.28 -1.44 -1.93  0.51 -0.82 -0.06 -1.41  1.23 -0.26
 [25]  0.22 -0.04 -2.17  0.60 -0.10 -0.92  0.13  2.62  1.03 -1.33 -1.73 -0.08
 [37]  0.45 -0.93  0.40  0.05  1.09 -1.23 -0.35  0.62  0.01 -1.08  1.70 -1.27
 [49]  0.55  0.60 -1.46  1.08 -1.88 -0.15  0.21  0.06  0.53 -1.16 -2.13 -0.03
 [61]  0.33 -1.07  0.98  0.62 -0.01 -0.53 -1.17 -0.28 -0.95  0.71 -0.58 -0.03
 [73] -1.47 -0.75 -0.54  0.42 -1.63  0.05 -1.90  0.40 -0.01  0.14 -1.58  1.37
 [85] -1.00 -0.90  1.69 -0.11 -2.19 -0.74  1.34 -0.75 -0.51 -0.99 -0.36 -1.63
 [97] -0.98  0.61  1.01  0.55

# Note that anonymous functions aren't being called, but being passed.
> function() {print('hello #rstats')}()
function() {print('hello #rstats')}()
> a = function() {print('hello #rstats')}
> a
function() {print('hello #rstats')}
> a()
[1] "hello #rstats"

(For those that follow #rstats, I also posted this there).

Remember, use apply, sapply, lapply, tapply, and do.call! Take avantage of R's vectorization. You should never walk up to a bunch of R code and see:

N = 10000
l = numeric()
for (i in seq(1:N)) {
    sim <- rnorm(1, 0, 1)
    l <- rbind(l, sim)
}

Not only is this not vectorized, but the array structure in R is not grown as it is in Python (doubling size when space runs out, IIRC). So each rbind step must first grow l enough to accept the results from rbind(), then copy all over the previous l's contents. For fun, try the above in R. Notice how long it takes (you won't even need Rprof or any timing function). Then try

N=10000
l <- rnorm(N, 0, 1)

The following is better than the first version too:

N = 10000
l = numeric(N)
for (i in seq(1:N)) {
    sim <- rnorm(1, 0, 1)
    l[i] <- sim
}
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Upon Dirk's advice, I am posting single examples. I hope they are not too "cute" [clever, but I don't care] or trivial for this audience.

Linear models are the bread and butter of R. When the number of independent variables is high, one has two choices. The first is to it use lm.fit(), which receives the design matrix x and the response y as arguments, similarly to Matlab. The drawback to this approach is that the return value is a list of objects (fitted coefficients, residuals, etc), not an object of class "lm", which can be nicely summarized, used for prediction, stepwise selection, etc. The second approach is create a formula:

> A
           X1         X2          X3         X4         y
1  0.96852363 0.33827107 0.261332257 0.62817021 1.6425326
2  0.08012755 0.69159828 0.087994158 0.93780481 0.9801304
3  0.10167545 0.38119304 0.865209832 0.16501662 0.4830873
4  0.06699458 0.41756415 0.258071616 0.34027775 0.7508766
   ...

> (f=paste("y ~",paste(names(A)[1:4],collapse=" + ")))
[1] "y ~ X1 + X2 + X3 + X4"

> lm(formula(f),data=A)

Call:
lm(formula = formula(f), data = A)

Coefficients:
(Intercept)           X1           X2           X3           X4  
    0.78236      0.95406     -0.06738     -0.43686     -0.06644
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You can assign a value returning from an if-else block.

Instead of, e.g.

condition <- runif(1) > 0.5
if(condition) x <- 1 else x <- 2

you can do

x <- if(condition) 1 else 2

Exactly how this works is deep magic.

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6  
You could also do this like x <- ifelse(condition, 1, 2), in which case each component is vectorized. –  Shane Dec 1 '09 at 15:36
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As a total noob to R and a novice at stats I love unclass() to print all elements of a data frame as an ordinary list.

It's pretty handy for a look at a complete data set all in one go to quickly eyeball any potential issues.

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2  
What?! A new R person who actually answered something instead of just asking a basic question and then disappearing?! I don't believe it. –  Matt Parker Jul 16 '10 at 22:13
3  
Er... by which I mean: welcome! –  Matt Parker Jul 16 '10 at 22:16
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CrossTable() from the gmodels package provides easy access to SAS- and SPSS-style crosstabs, along with the usual tests (Chisq, McNemar, etc.). Basically, it's xtabs() with fancy output and some additional tests - but it does make sharing output with the heathens easier.

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Definitively system(). To be able to have access to all the unix tools (at least under Linux/MacOSX) from inside the R environment has rapidly become invaluable in my daily workflow.

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1  
That ties into my earlier comment about connections: you can also use pipe() to pass data from, or to, Unix commands. See help(connections) for details and examples. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Aug 22 '09 at 16:27
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Here is an annoying workaround to convert a factor into a numeric. (Similar for other data types as well)

old.var <- as.numeric(levels(old.var))[as.numeric(old.var)]
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2  
Maybe you meant "into a characater" vector. In which case "as.character(old.var)" is simpler. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Aug 19 '09 at 16:03
1  
I've always thought this advice (which can be read at ?factor) to be misguided. You have to be sure old.var is a factor, and this will vary according on the options you set for the R session. Using as.numeric(as.character(old.var)) is both safer and cleaner. –  Eduardo Leoni Aug 20 '09 at 4:32
3  
Or slightly more efficiently: as.numeric(levels(old.var))[old.var] –  hadley Aug 20 '09 at 12:53
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Although this question has been up for a while I recently discovered a great trick on the SAS and R blog for using the command cut. The command is used to divide data into categories and I will use the iris dataset as an example and divide it into 10 categories:

> irisSL <- iris$Sepal.Length
> str(irisSL)
 num [1:150] 5.1 4.9 4.7 4.6 5 5.4 4.6 5 4.4 4.9 ...
> cut(irisSL, 10)
  [1] (5.02,5.38] (4.66,5.02] (4.66,5.02] (4.3,4.66]  (4.66,5.02] (5.38,5.74] (4.3,4.66]  (4.66,5.02] (4.3,4.66]  (4.66,5.02]
 [11] (5.38,5.74] (4.66,5.02] (4.66,5.02] (4.3,4.66]  (5.74,6.1]  (5.38,5.74] (5.38,5.74] (5.02,5.38] (5.38,5.74] (5.02,5.38]
 [21] (5.38,5.74] (5.02,5.38] (4.3,4.66]  (5.02,5.38] (4.66,5.02] (4.66,5.02] (4.66,5.02] (5.02,5.38] (5.02,5.38] (4.66,5.02]
 [31] (4.66,5.02] (5.38,5.74] (5.02,5.38] (5.38,5.74] (4.66,5.02] (4.66,5.02] (5.38,5.74] (4.66,5.02] (4.3,4.66]  (5.02,5.38]
 [41] (4.66,5.02] (4.3,4.66]  (4.3,4.66]  (4.66,5.02] (5.02,5.38] (4.66,5.02] (5.02,5.38] (4.3,4.66]  (5.02,5.38] (4.66,5.02]
 [51] (6.82,7.18] (6.1,6.46]  (6.82,7.18] (5.38,5.74] (6.46,6.82] (5.38,5.74] (6.1,6.46]  (4.66,5.02] (6.46,6.82] (5.02,5.38]
 [61] (4.66,5.02] (5.74,6.1]  (5.74,6.1]  (5.74,6.1]  (5.38,5.74] (6.46,6.82] (5.38,5.74] (5.74,6.1]  (6.1,6.46]  (5.38,5.74]
 [71] (5.74,6.1]  (5.74,6.1]  (6.1,6.46]  (5.74,6.1]  (6.1,6.46]  (6.46,6.82] (6.46,6.82] (6.46,6.82] (5.74,6.1]  (5.38,5.74]
 [81] (5.38,5.74] (5.38,5.74] (5.74,6.1]  (5.74,6.1]  (5.38,5.74] (5.74,6.1]  (6.46,6.82] (6.1,6.46]  (5.38,5.74] (5.38,5.74]
 [91] (5.38,5.74] (5.74,6.1]  (5.74,6.1]  (4.66,5.02] (5.38,5.74] (5.38,5.74] (5.38,5.74] (6.1,6.46]  (5.02,5.38] (5.38,5.74]
[101] (6.1,6.46]  (5.74,6.1]  (6.82,7.18] (6.1,6.46]  (6.46,6.82] (7.54,7.9]  (4.66,5.02] (7.18,7.54] (6.46,6.82] (7.18,7.54]
[111] (6.46,6.82] (6.1,6.46]  (6.46,6.82] (5.38,5.74] (5.74,6.1]  (6.1,6.46]  (6.46,6.82] (7.54,7.9]  (7.54,7.9]  (5.74,6.1] 
[121] (6.82,7.18] (5.38,5.74] (7.54,7.9]  (6.1,6.46]  (6.46,6.82] (7.18,7.54] (6.1,6.46]  (5.74,6.1]  (6.1,6.46]  (7.18,7.54]
[131] (7.18,7.54] (7.54,7.9]  (6.1,6.46]  (6.1,6.46]  (5.74,6.1]  (7.54,7.9]  (6.1,6.46]  (6.1,6.46]  (5.74,6.1]  (6.82,7.18]
[141] (6.46,6.82] (6.82,7.18] (5.74,6.1]  (6.46,6.82] (6.46,6.82] (6.46,6.82] (6.1,6.46]  (6.46,6.82] (6.1,6.46]  (5.74,6.1] 
10 Levels: (4.3,4.66] (4.66,5.02] (5.02,5.38] (5.38,5.74] (5.74,6.1] (6.1,6.46] (6.46,6.82] (6.82,7.18] ... (7.54,7.9]
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Another trick. Some packages, like glmnet, only take as inputs the design matrix and the response variable. If one wants to fit a model with all interactions between features, she can't use the formula "y ~ .^2". Using expand.grid() allows us to take advantage of the powerful array indexing and vector operations of R.

interArray=function(X){
    n=ncol(X)
    ind=expand.grid(1:n,1:n)
    return(X[,ind[,1]]*X[,ind[,2]])
}

> X
          X1         X2
1 0.96852363 0.33827107
2 0.08012755 0.69159828
3 0.10167545 0.38119304
4 0.06699458 0.41756415
5 0.08187816 0.09805104

> interArray(X)
           X1          X2        X1.1        X2.1
1 0.938038022 0.327623524 0.327623524 0.114427316
2 0.006420424 0.055416073 0.055416073 0.478308177
3 0.010337897 0.038757974 0.038757974 0.145308137
4 0.004488274 0.027974536 0.027974536 0.174359821
5 0.006704033 0.008028239 0.008028239 0.009614007
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3  
If a modelling function doesn't accept a formula (which is very rare!) wouldn't it be better to construct the design matrix with model.matrix? –  hadley Aug 19 '09 at 12:14
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One of my favorite, if not somewhat unorthodox tricks, is the use of eval() and parse(). This example perhaps illustrates how it can be helpful

NY.Capital <- 'Albany'
state <- 'NY'
parameter <- 'Capital'
eval(parse(text=paste(state, parameter, sep='.')))

[1] "Albany"

This type of situation occurs more often than not, and use of eval() and parse() can help address it. Of course, I welcome any feedback on alternative ways of coding this up.

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1  
This can be done as well with named vector elements. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Aug 21 '09 at 2:01
3  
library(fortunes);fortune(106) If the answer is parse() you should usually rethink the question. -- Thomas Lumley R-help (February 2005) –  Eduardo Leoni Aug 21 '09 at 11:40
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set.seed() sets the random number generator state.

For example:

> set.seed(123)
> rnorm(1)
[1] -0.5604756
> rnorm(1)
[1] -0.2301775
> set.seed(123)
> rnorm(1)
[1] -0.5604756
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For those who are writing C to be called from R: .Internal(inspect(...)) is handy. For example:

> .Internal(inspect(quote(a+2)))
  @867dc28 06 LANGSXP g0c0 [] 
  @8436998 01 SYMSXP g1c0 [MARK,gp=0x4000] "+"
  @85768b0 01 SYMSXP g1c0 [MARK,NAM(2)] "a"
  @8d7bf48 14 REALSXP g0c1 [] (len=1, tl=0) 2
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d = '~/R Code/Library/'

files = list.files(d,'.r$')

for (f in files) { if (!(f == 'mysource.r' )) { print(paste('Sourcing',f)) source(paste(d,f,sep='')) } }

I use the above code to source all the files in a directory at start up with various utility programs I use in my interactive session with R. I am sure there are better ways but I find it useful for my work. The line that does this is as follows.

source("~/R Code/Library/mysource.r")

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6  
Don't do it. Write a package. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Nov 28 '10 at 21:13
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To perform an operation on a number of variables in a data frame. This is stolen from subset.data.frame.

get.vars<-function(vars,data){
    nl <- as.list(1L:ncol(data))
    names(nl) <- names(data)
    vars <- eval(substitute(vars), nl, parent.frame())
    data[,vars]
    #do stuff here
}

get.vars(c(cyl:hwy,class),mpg)
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1  
This seems cool at first, but this sort of code will cause you no end of trouble in the long run. It's always better to be explicit. –  hadley Aug 21 '09 at 15:57
3  
No, this isn't a veiled suggestion to use plyr instead. The basically problem with your code is that it is semantically lazy - instead of making the user explicitly spell out what they want, you do some "magic" to guess. The problem with this is that it makes the function very hard to program with - i.e. it's difficult to write a function that calls get.vars without jumping through a whole lot of hoops. –  hadley Aug 23 '09 at 14:00
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I've posted this once before but I use it so much I thought I'd post it again. Its just a little function to return the names and position numbers of a data.frame. Its nothing special to be sure, but I almost never make it through a session without using it multiple times.

##creates an object from a data.frame listing the column names and location

namesind=function(df){

temp1=names(df)
temp2=seq(1,length(temp1))
temp3=data.frame(temp1,temp2)
names(temp3)=c("VAR","COL")
return(temp3)
rm(temp1,temp2,temp3)

}

ni <- namesind

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4  
This is a really a one-liner: data.frame(VAR = names(df), COL = seq_along(df)) –  hadley Aug 21 '09 at 15:58
1  
I use: data.frame(colnames(the.df)) –  Tal Galili Mar 7 '10 at 12:24
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