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My own problem:

Let G be a undirected graph with n vertex and m edges.
We have a list that v_1 to v_2 but it's not important now.
Every edge has a weight equal to X.
Our task is to find all pairs (v_i, v_j) that fastest path from v_i to v_j is w = 2X.

(Look at example)

It is possible to do it faster than brute v * dikstra or v*v?? Can this problem can be solved in O(n^2) time? Which algorithm will be best? Thanks for every help.

Example:

    n = m = 5
    v_1 -> v_2 -> v_3 -> v_4 -> v_5 and v_1 -> v_3

Solution:

(1,4), (2,4), (3,5)

Picture: http://i.stack.imgur.com/rVhee.gif

Shortest path from v_1 to v_4 is 2X (the same with another solutions).

EDIT: we have adjacency List.

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1 Answer 1

It is possible to do it faster than brute v * dikstra or v*v?? Can this problem can be solved in $O(n)$ or $O(n log n)$ time ?

You cannot get better then O(n^2) ( = O(v*v)) since the output might contains O(n^2) different entries, for example:

          a
          |
     b----c----d
          |
          e

There is a path of length 2 from every vertex to every vertex except when source/target = c. Generalizing this graph will get you O(n^2) pairs with the required distance

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Can you help me with creating O(n*n) algorithm? –  John Smith Oct 18 '12 at 18:23
    
Actually, I am not familiar with one, I'll try to think of it (though note it wasn't the question). O(n*m) solution could be to run BFS from each node. –  amit Oct 18 '12 at 18:32
    
And what will you do if path from v1 to v2 is X, 4X and 2X? BFS wouldn't work as fast as O(nm). Any other ideas? –  John Smith Oct 18 '12 at 20:27
    
@JohnSmith" The question indicates Every edge has a weight equal to X. If every edge has the same weight, the graph can be reduced to unweighted and you can invoke BFS. If the statement from the question is not correct, BFS will not be correct (but again, this is not the question here...) –  amit Oct 18 '12 at 20:29

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