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I'm studying computer systems and I've made this very simple function which uses fork() to create a child process. fork() returns a pid_t that is 0 if it's a child process. But calling the getpid() function within this child process returns a different, nonzero pid. In the code I have below, is newPid only meaningful in the context of the program, and not to the operating system? Is it possibly only a relative value, measured against the pid of the parent?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void unixError(char* msg)
{
    printf("%s: %s\n", msg, strerror(errno));
    exit(0);
}

pid_t Fork()
{
    pid_t pid;
    if ((pid = fork()) < 0)
        unixError("Fork error");
    return pid;
}


int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    pid_t thisPid, parentPid, newPid;
    int count = 0;
    thisPid = getpid();
    parentPid = getppid();

    printf("thisPid = %d, parent pid = %d\n", thisPid, parentPid);

    if ((newPid = Fork()) == 0) {
        count++;
        printf("I am the child. My pid is %d, my other pid is %d\n", getpid(), newPid);
        exit(0);
    }
    printf("I am the parent. My pid is %d\n", thisPid);
    return 0;
}

Output:

thisPid = 30050, parent pid = 30049
I am the parent. My pid is 30050
I am the child. My pid is 30052, my other pid is 0

Lastly, why is the child's pid 2 higher than the parent's, and not 1? The difference between the main function's pid and its parent is 1, but when we create a child it increments the pid by 2. Why is that?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

From fork man page :

Return Value

On success, the PID of the child process is returned in the parent, and 0 is returned in the child. On failure, -1 is returned in the parent, no child process is created, and errno is set appropriately.

Fork does not returns the pid of the child, only in the parent. Therefore, the child process does not have two pids.

Try this

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    pid_t thisPid, parentPid, newPid;
    int count = 0;
    thisPid = getpid();
    parentPid = getppid();

    printf("thisPid = %d, parent pid = %d\n", thisPid, parentPid);

    if ((newPid = Fork()) == 0) {
        count++;
        printf("I am teh child. My pid is %d\n", getpid());
        exit(0);
    }
    else
       printf("I am the parent. My pid is %d, my child pid is %d\n", thisPid, newPid);
    return 0;
}
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Explained perfectly. Thanks for clearing that up. –  limp_chimp Oct 18 '12 at 17:05
    
I suppose you wanted to print the result from getpid in the child? Now it's printing 0. –  larsmans Oct 18 '12 at 17:05
    
Indeed, thanks for pointing that out. –  Tom Ahh Oct 18 '12 at 17:06
    
Remember to validate the answer if your problem is solved. –  Tom Ahh Oct 18 '12 at 17:10

No, a pid is assigned to exactly one process at a time.

Process ids do not need to follow any rules when being assigned to processes. So if it looks as if a child pid is the increment of the parent's pid this is just luck.

By the pid of certain processes it is not possible to draw any conclusions regarding the processes relationship.

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Thanks; can you elaborate? –  limp_chimp Oct 18 '12 at 16:59

Pids are one-per process. There will NEVER be more than 1 pid for a process - the internal data structures that handle the process in the OS only have a single PID field in them.

Beyond that, when you call fork() you are cloning the process that called fork, producing an exactly duplicate of it - all file handles, all memory, etc.. EXCEPT for its PID. That's why fork returns different values depending on if you're the child or parent process. This differing return values lets the program know if it's a child or a parent. The child gets 0, and can therefore know it's the child.

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PIDs are not sequential on assignment (the actually follow no rules) and one process has only one PID at a time. Also there can never be two processes that share the same PID.

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