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While writing a CUDA kernel just now, I had occasion to test the result of the following code:

unsigned char temp1 = 0x00;
unsigned char temp2 = 0x00;
unsigned char temp3 = temp1/temp2;

printf("%02X", temp3);`

This code prints "0xFF". I am extremely perplexed by this, can anyone offer an explanation?

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4  
aren't the results of "undefined division" undefined? What were you expecting? –  Robert Crovella Oct 18 '12 at 19:00
3  
As Robert points out, the result of an integer division by zero is undefined according to the C/C++ standards. In such a case, NVIDIA GPUs return a result with all bits set to 1 (which maps to 0xff for an unsigned char). I believe this is for compatibility with DirectX, but CUDA programmers should definitely treat this as an implementation artifact, as one cannot rely on undefined behavior in any way. –  njuffa Oct 18 '12 at 19:16
    
@njuffa, please turn your comment into an answer. It sounds like it might get accepted, as it does offer a reasonable explanation. It would be nice to get this question off the unanswered list. –  MvG Oct 18 '12 at 21:48
    
@MvG: Thanks. Done. –  njuffa Oct 18 '12 at 23:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The result of an integer division by zero is undefined according to the C/C++ standards. See C99 section 6.5.5, for example:

The result of the / operator is the quotient from the division of the first operand by the second; the result of the % operator is the remainder. In both operations, if the value of the second operand is zero, the behavior is undefined

In the case of division by zero, the integer division operators on NVIDIA GPUs return a result with all bits set to 1. This may be for compatibility with DirectX. The same applies to a modulo operator where the divisor is zero. You may observe different results when all operands are literal constants, as those cases are probably handled by the compiler optimizer at compile time.

In any event CUDA programmers should definitely treat these results as implementation artifacts, as one cannot rely on undefined behavior in any way at any time.

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Sorry, brano, your suggested edit had already been rejected three times so I could not longer accept it. I have applied your suggested change by hand. –  njuffa Oct 19 '12 at 10:26
    
Thanks all, that was really bugging me. –  pg1989 Oct 19 '12 at 20:12

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