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I have a dictionary of form:

d = {123:{2:1,3:1}, 124:{3:1}, 125:{2:1},126:{1:1}}

So, lets look into 2nd degree keys..

123--> 2,3
124--> 3
125--> 2
126--> 1

So total number of unique 2nd order keys are:

1,2,3

Now, i want to modify this dict as

 d = {123:{1:0,2:1,3:1}, 124:{1:0,2:0,3:1}, 125:{1:0,2:1,3:0},126:{1:1,2:0,3:0}}

So basically all the 2nd order keys absent in a particular 2d dict.. add that key with value 0.

What is the pythonic way to do this? Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted
keyset = set()
for k in d:
    keyset.update(d[k])

for k in d:
    for kk in keyset:
        d[k].setdefault(kk, 0)
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1  
+1. Simple and readable. A good reminder not to do too much on one line. –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 18 '12 at 17:40
import operator

second_order_keys = reduce(operator.__or__,
                           (set(v.iterkeys()) for v in d.itervalues()))
for v in d.itervalues():
    for k in second_order_keys:
        v.setdefault(k, 0)

Or, in Python 3:

from functools import reduce
import operator

second_order_keys = reduce(operator.__or__,
                           (v.keys() for v in d.values()))
for v in d.values():
    for k in second_order_keys:
        v.setdefault(k, 0)
share|improve this answer
    
I had to read your use of reduce a few times before I could understand it. second_order_keys = set(k for v in d.itervalues() for k in v) is simpler to me. –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 18 '12 at 17:37
    
@StevenRumbalski :) I can't still get what reduce does there and why the need for or operator. –  ovgolovin Oct 18 '12 at 18:10
    
@StevenRumbalski Got it only after a minute. Very convoluted indeed! –  ovgolovin Oct 18 '12 at 18:12
    
@ovgolovin: It's very clear to people with a more functional background (not me). –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 18 '12 at 18:15
1  
@StevenRumbalski: I actually agree, but this is the first version that come to mind and when other people had posted better solutions, I decided to leave it as is. FP happens to be a major part of my day job :) –  larsmans Oct 18 '12 at 19:29
In [25]: d = {123:{2:1,3:1}, 124:{3:1}, 125:{2:1},126:{1:1}}

In [26]: se=set(y for x in d for y in d[x])

In [27]: for x in d:
    foo=se.difference(d[x])
    d[x].update(dict(zip(foo,[0]*len(foo))))
   ....:     
   ....:     

In [30]: d
Out[30]: 
{123: {1: 0, 2: 1, 3: 1},
 124: {1: 0, 2: 0, 3: 1},
 125: {1: 0, 2: 1, 3: 0},
 126: {1: 1, 2: 0, 3: 0}}

here use set difference to get the missing keys and then update() the dict:

In [39]: for x in d:
    foo=se.difference(d[x])
    print foo                # missing keys per dict
set([1])
set([1, 2])
set([1, 3])
set([2, 3])
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1  
No need to cast the results of zip to a dict. update can handle a list of two item tuples. –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 18 '12 at 17:28
    
To my mind, it would be even more Pythonic if set(key2 for key,value in d.iteritems() for key2 in value) be used. Also, there is no need to construct dict in d[x].update(dict(zip(foo,[0]*len(foo)))) as update can take just iterator, so d[x].update(zip(foo,[0]*len(foo))) will do, also, d[x] here could also be replaced with value if iteritems() is used. –  ovgolovin Oct 18 '12 at 17:29
1  
d[x].update((k,0) for k in foo) is probably simplest. –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 18 '12 at 17:30

I like the solution of Ashwini Chaudhary.

I edited it to incorporate all the suggestions in the comments with other minor changes for it to look how I would prefer it:

Edited (incorporates the suggestion of Steven Rumbalski to this answer).

all_second_keys = set(key for value in d.itervalues() for key in value)

for value in d.itervalues():
    value.update((key,0) for key in all_second_keys if key not in value)
share|improve this answer
    
I would change the first line to all_second_keys = set(key for value in d.itervalues() for key in value). –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 18 '12 at 17:46
    
Second line to: for value in d.itervalues(): value.update((key,0) for key in all_second_keys.difference(value)) –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 18 '12 at 17:49
1  
@StevenRumbalski Thank you! I updated the answer. I only didn't alter ...for key in all_second_keys if key not in value to for key in all_second_keys.difference(value). Their time complexity is the same, but I like it more the way I left it in the answer. –  ovgolovin Oct 18 '12 at 18:04

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