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I'm running valgrind memcheck on a program that spawns thousands of other threads.

The other threads do not generate errors, and I don't care what happens to them.

However, Valgrind insists on opening a named pipe in /tmp every time a new thread spawns. Not only is this wasteful, it actually breaks valgrind. Sometimes valgrind doesn't clean up after itself, and then future children with the same pid (active at a later time) fail to spawn because valgrind can't make a pipe with the right name (it already exists).

How can I prevent Valgrind from making all these pipes!?!

EDIT: Flags I have already tried:

--child-silent-after-fork=yes

and things I have already ruled out:

--track-children=no (default value is no).

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4  
' Sometimes valgrind doesn't clean up after itself' - LOL! +1 just for that:) –  Martin James Oct 18 '12 at 17:42
2  
Please post the valgrind memcheck options you have tried. –  nalply Oct 18 '12 at 17:48
2  
If it breaks valgrind, you could run valgrind in valgrind, so you can valgrind valgrinding valgrind... yo dawg, by the way. –  Griwes Oct 18 '12 at 18:50
    
@nalpy: updated. –  John Doucette Oct 19 '12 at 11:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Sorry to answer my own question. Just for documentation purposes.

Running with the flag:

--vgdb=no

This is not properly documented in the man pages, since it doesn't tell you that it's going to spew pipes everywhere without the flag, but that's why it does it.

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You can answer your own questions. This is encouraged practice. No need to apologize. –  nalply Oct 19 '12 at 13:11
    
How did you find that out? –  nalply Oct 19 '12 at 13:11
    
Lots of goggling + trial and error. The valgrind mailing list had a similar issue. Looks like it happens when MMAP fails sometimes maybe. See: sourceforge.net/mailarchive/… –  John Doucette Oct 19 '12 at 13:16

If you can, adjust your initial program so that you can turn the thread-spawning off with a command-line argument. Run valgrind on the result, with the thread-spawning removed.

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A sensible idea, but unfortunately, in my case, the program doesn't do much of anything without the threads. –  John Doucette Oct 18 '12 at 21:04

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