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I'm trying to run this sql server statement:

delete C from Company C, Company D where C.CompanyID > 1310 AND C.CompanyID != D.ParentID

I'm getting the following sql error:

The DELETE statement conflicted with the SAME TABLE REFERENCE constraint "FK_Company_Company". The conflict occurred in database "DevelopmentDB", table "dbo.Company", column 'ParentID'.

I checked and there are no companies where ParentID = CompanyID. I'm curious why my delete statement isn't filtering out the companies that would cause this constraint to be broken.

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1 Answer 1

Have you verified the results of your attempt with something like this to ensure that what you are attempting to delete is what you actually intend to delete?

select C.<field list> from Company C, Company D 
where C.CompanyID > 1310 AND C.CompanyID != D.ParentID

You might also try the delete statement using a sub query approach. It might make it easier to logically identify that the query you are running is what you are actually intending.

However, I always recommend testing with a select first for verification.

So running (if this is your intended results - modify if not):

Select <field list> FROM Company WHERE CompanyID > 1310 
AND CompanyID NOT IN 
    (SELECT ParentID FROM Company)

Before running (again, this is just an example).:

DELETE Company WHERE CompanyID > 1310 
AND CompanyID NOT IN 
    (SELECT ParentID FROM Company)
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I'm getting 0 rows for the 2nd query you wrote, which confuses me. If that were the case then a constraint wouldn't be the issue, and 0 rows would be affected. –  Dave Oct 18 '12 at 18:19
    
Zero rows means that any companyid's that are > 1310 DO HAVE companyId's that are also parentID's. You can try the select statement without the subquery to verify existence of companyid's greater than 1310. –  RThomas Oct 18 '12 at 18:26
    
Could you update your question with the specific flavor of sql we're talking about here. TSQL, PLSQL, Postgres, etc etc. –  RThomas Oct 18 '12 at 18:27

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