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I have the following function:

      int v[]={0,1,1,1};
      int f(int x)
      {
          if(x>=1)  return v[x]+f(x-1);
          else return 0; 
      }

When I called it in main like so: cout<<f(4); It's outputting '4' but I expect to be '3' Can someone clarify why I get '4' and not '3' ? (I think I'm missing something)

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v[4] is undefined, indices are counted from 0 in C++ –  Vlad Oct 18 '12 at 18:05
1  
well v[4] doesn't exist, so who knows what you will get from that. I think the thing you are missing here is that indexes are zero based (start at 0) not starting with 1. –  Chad Oct 18 '12 at 18:08
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

v[4] is not defined. It has 4 elements, so the max array index is 3.

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Anything can happen because this is undefined behavior. Arrays in C++ are 0-based - they start at 0 and go to number of elements - 1.

4 is a perfectly valid answer, as would 10 or 42 be.

v only has indexes 0...3, anything other than that is UB.

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v[4] has 4 elements and hence max index is 3. The array index starts from 0 and since you have not initialized it it will take the max index as 3 as it has 4 elements at present.

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The output of

      int v[]={0,1,1,1};
      int f(int x)
      {
          if(x>=1)  return v[x]+f(x-1);
          else return 0; 
      }

is undefined when called with cout << f(4) because its getting the value beyond x=3. This is incorrect. Arrays start at 0 and for your array, its range is from 0 -> 3(=4 elements).

To correct it, you must call cout << f(3);

Also to check for the range:

A simple check like this inside int f(x) will give you the correct result.

Something like this:

  #define checkRange(x,y) (((sizeof(x)/sizeof(x[0])) >= y)?true:false)

  int v[]={0,1,1,1};
  int f(int x)
  {
      if(!checkRange(v,x)){
          return 0+f(x-1);
      }
      if(x>=1)  return v[x]+f(x-1);
      else return 0; 
  }
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int elementcount = (sizeof(ptr) / sizeof(ptr[0])); No, that just doesn't work the way you think it does. –  jrok Oct 18 '12 at 18:15
    
how does it work? –  Aniket Oct 18 '12 at 18:16
    
You seem to think that sizeof(ptr) returns size of allocated space that pointer points to, is that right? –  jrok Oct 18 '12 at 18:18
    
in bytes? yes. Am I wrong? if so can you point to a location on the internet that can school me? –  Aniket Oct 18 '12 at 18:20
    
Yes, you are wrong. sizeof operator returns a compile-time constant size of the type, in this case int*, which is typically 4 on 32-bit systems and 8 on 64-bit systems. –  jrok Oct 18 '12 at 18:23
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