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I have to pass two arrays 1) that are filled with 1000 int's between 0-100 2) that contains ten bins to sort the 1000 numbers.

How do I create the counter to sort numbers into ten bins such as 0-9, 10-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49,50-59 and so on to 90-99...

Would it be with an if/else that sorts them? If so, how do I add values into each bin? Would it be something like this?

This is what I have so far:

          //initialize array of 1000 elements
          int[] numbers = new int[1000];
          int i = 0;
          //initialize array of 10 bins
          int[] bins = new int[10];

          void setup() {
              // Populate array with random number
              for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
                 numbers[i] = ceil(random(0,99));
              }

           }

           //function that sorts random numbers into bins
           void counter(int[] numbers, int[] bins) {

           }
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This is a bucket sort for integers: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bucket_sort –  Colin D Oct 18 '12 at 18:40
    
0-100 is not evenly divisible by 10. make sure you handle the odd ranged bucket appropriately. –  Colin D Oct 18 '12 at 18:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want every number from numbers in the right bin then I would use an array of 10 ArrayLists as the datastructure for your bins.

int[] numbers = new int[1000];
ArrayList[] bins = new ArrayList[10];

void setup() {
    for(int i = 0; i<bins.length; i++) {
        bins[i] = new ArrayList();
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
        numbers[i] = floor(random(0,100));
    }
}

void counter(int[] numbers, ArrayList[] bins) {
    for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
        bins[floor(float(numbers[i])/10.0)].add(numbers[i]);
    }
}

You then get a bin with (for example the first bin consisting of numbers with values 0-9):

int sizeBin = bins[0].size();
for(int i=0; i<sizeBin; i++) {
    println(bins[0].get(i));
}

If you want the count of numbers in a bin you can get it with (again an example with the bin 0-9)

bins[0].size();
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this seems like a very different approach then what i originally had... My only question is, with what you have provided where do you specify the conditions (boundaries) for each bin? –  choloboy Oct 19 '12 at 15:11
1  
@theolc I calculate the right bin with the expression floor(float(numbers[i])/10.0) that I use to find the right index of the bin array. If the number is in the range 0-9 the expression will give 0, if it's in range 10-19 it will give 1... so I put every number at the right position into the array. –  halex Oct 19 '12 at 17:23
1  
@theolc BTW: I just found a bug in the code when calculating your random numbers in setup(). ceil(random(0,99)) Will give you numbers mostly in range 1-99 and not 0-99, because ceil(floatnumber) will become 0 only in the unlikely case when floatnumber is exactly 0. It gives you you 1 if floatnumber is a little bit larger than 0 and smaller than 1 (for way more cases than the exactly 1 to get 0) and so forth until 99. Better use floor(random(0, 100)). –  halex Oct 19 '12 at 17:25
1  
@theolc I had two errors. the first was a missing } after the for that fills the array numbers in your setup. The second error was at the line int sizeBins = bins[0].size(), I forgot the ; at the end of the statement. I also put the initialisations of the arraylists for each bin inside the setup because that's the right place where all initialisations belong to and a good design. –  halex Oct 20 '12 at 21:50
1  
@theolc Array of Arraylist is confusing I have to admit :). One Arraylist is similar to an array, but with the advantage that the size is not fixed and you can just add elements where you don't know the number of. You now need one Arraylist for every bin so you have an array of 10 arraylists. Understanding these 2 dimensional data structures is difficult in the beginning but they often help clarify your code and in this case it fits well to your problem. P.S. I fixed the problems I explained in the last comment in my post. –  halex Oct 20 '12 at 21:58

the simplest way a can think of is to use a for loop to cycle through the numbers[] and then a series of if statements to evaluate whether the number is <= 9 , <= 19 etc

    void counter(int[] numbers, int[] bins){
    int count = 0;
    int length = numbers.length;
    for(int i = 0; i< length; i++){
       if(numbers[i] <= 9){

          bins[count] = numbers[i];
          count++;
       }
    //and the same for 10-19 etc...
}

something like this maybe? not very eloquent but since the array is only 1000 elements it should suffice

share|improve this answer
    
That is actually what I was thinking... Thanks a lot! And am I passing the two arrays from setup into this function properly??? (I am new to processing) –  choloboy Oct 18 '12 at 18:19
    
actually a quick correction: bins[0] should say bins[count] , and yes it looks like you are passing in the parameters properly to me! mind you i haven't used processing in a while! –  Simon Hillary Oct 18 '12 at 18:33
    
do i use bins[count] for each if statement? sorry for all the questions... I am a beginner with processing. –  choloboy Oct 20 '12 at 21:32
    
no i would set up a counter for each bin. for example countBin1, countBin2 etc. and only increment each counter when the corresponding bin has a value added to it –  Simon Hillary Oct 23 '12 at 13:41

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