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I want to modify the XSLT 1.0 transform in the attached xsl file to generate an HTML version of the table coded in the XML file (also attached). The resulting HTML output file has to contain the table defined in the XML file with all of its content retained, with alternating rows of data assigned different background tints when rendered in a web browser. Also, the resulting HTML output has to be a valid XHTML 1.1, and must be generated in a single pass, i.e. run.bat is executed once. Please help me out. Thank you in advance, I really appreciate this!

XSL file:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:transform xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:saxon="http://icl.com/saxon" xmlns:date="http://exslt.org/dates-and-times" extension-element-prefixes="saxon date" version="1.0">
  <xsl:output method="text" encoding="UTF-8" indent="no"/>
  <xsl:template match="Item">Hello world</xsl:template>
</xsl:transform>

XML file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Item TextType="BodyMatter" SchemaVersion="2.0" id="AaAF_Freelance_Test_1" DiscussionAlias="Discussion" SessionAlias="Chapter" SecondColour="Pantone326C" ThirdColour="Pantone2945C" FourthColour="Pantone272C" Logo="colour" Rendering="VLE Preview" Template="Wide_Margin_Reduced_A4_Unnumbered_new_design_v10_release1">
  <CourseCode>AaAF</CourseCode>
  <CourseTitle>Accessible and alternative formats</CourseTitle>
  <ItemID/>
  <ItemTitle>AaAF: Freelance XSLT test document 1</ItemTitle>
  <Unit>
    <UnitID/>
    <UnitTitle/>
    <ByLine/>
    <Session>
      <Title>Freelance XSLT test – constructing tables</Title>
      <Paragraph>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec quis elit sapien. Duis sit amet interdum lectus. Sed faucibus, mi quis dapibus consequat, nisi nunc semper erat, eu pretium enim urna porta diam. Suspendisse mi nisi, adipiscing in semper ac, viverra vitae nisl. Nulla facilisi. Nullam luctus porttitor velit, quis euismod dui commodo eu. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Mauris arcu est, rhoncus interdum bibendum vel, commodo et justo.</Paragraph>
      <Table>
        <TableHead>Table of analytical techniques</TableHead>
        <tbody>
          <tr>
            <th class="ColumnHeadLeft">Analytical technique</th>
            <th class="ColumnHeadLeft">Application</th>
          </tr>
          <tr>
            <td class="TableLeft">IR reflectography</td>
            <td class="TableLeft">Characterisation of painting techniques, in panel and wall paintings, through the identification of underdrawings; identification of undocumented interventions; characterisation of pigments.</td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
            <td class="TableLeft">FT-IR spectroscopy</td>
            <td class="TableLeft"><i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of alterations on stones, mortars and metals, identification of pigments and binders in paintings; identification of undocumented restorations.</td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
            <td class="TableLeft">Raman spectroscopy</td>
            <td class="TableLeft"><i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of alterations on stones, mortars and metals; identification of pigments in wall paintings. </td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
            <td class="TableLeft">XRF</td>
            <td class="TableLeft">Elemental analyses of stones, metals, wall and easel paintings, and other objects. </td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
            <td class="TableLeft">Vis-NIR spectroscopy</td>
            <td class="TableLeft">Colorimetric measurements and, possibly, identification of pigments. Measurement of possible colour changing after restoration.</td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
            <td class="TableLeft">UV-vis spectroscopy</td>
            <td class="TableLeft"><i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of the presence of organic substances. </td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
            <td class="TableLeft">Fluorimetry</td>
            <td class="TableLeft"><i>In situ</i> detection of the distribution of organic molecules</td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
            <td class="TableLeft">Drilling resistance measurement </td>
            <td class="TableLeft">Hardness of rocks used for monuments and sculptures</td>
          </tr>
        </tbody>
      </Table>
    </Session>
  </Unit>
</Item>

run.bat file:

java -jar ou_saxon.jar -o output1.html input.xml convert.xsl
pause
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:apply-templates select="/*/*/*/Table"/>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="Table">
  <table>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </table>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="TableHead">
  <th><xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/></th>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="tr[not(th)][position() mod 2 = 1]">
  <tr class="odd">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </tr>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="tr[not(th)][position() mod 2 = 0]">
  <tr class="even">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </tr>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<Item TextType="BodyMatter" SchemaVersion="2.0" id="AaAF_Freelance_Test_1" DiscussionAlias="Discussion" SessionAlias="Chapter" SecondColour="Pantone326C" ThirdColour="Pantone2945C" FourthColour="Pantone272C" Logo="colour" Rendering="VLE Preview" Template="Wide_Margin_Reduced_A4_Unnumbered_new_design_v10_release1">
    <CourseCode>AaAF</CourseCode>
    <CourseTitle>Accessible and alternative formats</CourseTitle>
    <ItemID/>
    <ItemTitle>AaAF: Freelance XSLT test document 1</ItemTitle>
    <Unit>
        <UnitID/>
        <UnitTitle/>
        <ByLine/>
        <Session>
            <Title>Freelance XSLT test – constructing tables</Title>
            <Paragraph>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec quis elit sapien. Duis sit amet interdum lectus. Sed faucibus, mi quis dapibus consequat, nisi nunc semper erat, eu pretium enim urna porta diam. Suspendisse mi nisi, adipiscing in semper ac, viverra vitae nisl. Nulla facilisi. Nullam luctus porttitor velit, quis euismod dui commodo eu. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Mauris arcu est, rhoncus interdum bibendum vel, commodo et justo.</Paragraph>
            <Table>
                <TableHead>Table of analytical techniques</TableHead>
                <tbody>
                    <tr>
                        <th class="ColumnHeadLeft">Analytical technique</th>
                        <th class="ColumnHeadLeft">Application</th>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td class="TableLeft">IR reflectography</td>
                        <td class="TableLeft">Characterisation of painting techniques, in panel and wall paintings, through the identification of underdrawings; identification of undocumented interventions; characterisation of pigments.</td>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td class="TableLeft">FT-IR spectroscopy</td>
                        <td class="TableLeft">
                            <i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of alterations on stones, mortars and metals, identification of pigments and binders in paintings; identification of undocumented restorations.
                        </td>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td class="TableLeft">Raman spectroscopy</td>
                        <td class="TableLeft">
                            <i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of alterations on stones, mortars and metals; identification of pigments in wall paintings. 
                        </td>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td class="TableLeft">XRF</td>
                        <td class="TableLeft">Elemental analyses of stones, metals, wall and easel paintings, and other objects. </td>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td class="TableLeft">Vis-NIR spectroscopy</td>
                        <td class="TableLeft">Colorimetric measurements and, possibly, identification of pigments. Measurement of possible colour changing after restoration.</td>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td class="TableLeft">UV-vis spectroscopy</td>
                        <td class="TableLeft">
                            <i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of the presence of organic substances. 
                        </td>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td class="TableLeft">Fluorimetry</td>
                        <td class="TableLeft">
                            <i>In situ</i> detection of the distribution of organic molecules
                        </td>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td class="TableLeft">Drilling resistance measurement </td>
                        <td class="TableLeft">Hardness of rocks used for monuments and sculptures</td>
                    </tr>
                </tbody>
            </Table>
        </Session>
    </Unit>
</Item>

produces the wanted, correct result:

<table>
   <th>Table of analytical techniques</th>
   <tbody>
      <tr>
         <th class="ColumnHeadLeft">Analytical technique</th>
         <th class="ColumnHeadLeft">Application</th>
      </tr>
      <tr class="odd">
         <td class="TableLeft">IR reflectography</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">Characterisation of painting techniques, in panel and wall paintings, through the identification of underdrawings; identification of undocumented interventions; characterisation of pigments.</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="even">
         <td class="TableLeft">FT-IR spectroscopy</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">
            <i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of alterations on stones, mortars and metals, identification of pigments and binders in paintings; identification of undocumented restorations.
                        </td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="odd">
         <td class="TableLeft">Raman spectroscopy</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">
            <i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of alterations on stones, mortars and metals; identification of pigments in wall paintings. 
                        </td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="even">
         <td class="TableLeft">XRF</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">Elemental analyses of stones, metals, wall and easel paintings, and other objects. </td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="odd">
         <td class="TableLeft">Vis-NIR spectroscopy</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">Colorimetric measurements and, possibly, identification of pigments. Measurement of possible colour changing after restoration.</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="even">
         <td class="TableLeft">UV-vis spectroscopy</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">
            <i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of the presence of organic substances. 
                        </td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="odd">
         <td class="TableLeft">Fluorimetry</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">
            <i>In situ</i> detection of the distribution of organic molecules
                        </td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="even">
         <td class="TableLeft">Drilling resistance measurement </td>
         <td class="TableLeft">Hardness of rocks used for monuments and sculptures</td>
      </tr>
   </tbody>
</table>

Do note:

The transformation just adds a class attribute of "odd" or "even" to each tr. This assumes that a css file would also be referenced and it has the appropriate CSS properties defined for .odd and .even.

If this isn't the case, one would alter the transformation to generate direct formatting.

For example, we couldhave in the two templates, respectively:

  <tr bgcolor="white">

and

  <tr bgcolor="#87b1f1">

Finally, if we want the output to be in the XHTML namespace, we would further modufy the transformation like this:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:apply-templates select="/*/*/*/Table"/>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="*">
   <xsl:element name="{name()}" namespace="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
     <xsl:copy-of select="namespace::*"/>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
   </xsl:element>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="Table">
  <table>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </table>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="TableHead">
  <th><xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/></th>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="tr[not(th)][position() mod 2 = 1]">
  <tr bgcolor="white">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </tr>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="tr[not(th)][position() mod 2 = 0]">
  <tr bgcolor="#87b1f1">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </tr>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When the same XML document is processed with this transformation, the result is now in the XHTML namespace:

<table xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
   <th>Table of analytical techniques</th>
   <tbody>
      <tr>
         <th class="ColumnHeadLeft">Analytical technique</th>
         <th class="ColumnHeadLeft">Application</th>
      </tr>
      <tr bgcolor="white">
         <td class="TableLeft">IR reflectography</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">Characterisation of painting techniques, in panel and wall paintings, through the identification of underdrawings; identification of undocumented interventions; characterisation of pigments.</td>
      </tr>
      <tr bgcolor="#87b1f1">
         <td class="TableLeft">FT-IR spectroscopy</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">
            <i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of alterations on stones, mortars and metals, identification of pigments and binders in paintings; identification of undocumented restorations.
                        </td>
      </tr>
      <tr bgcolor="white">
         <td class="TableLeft">Raman spectroscopy</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">
            <i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of alterations on stones, mortars and metals; identification of pigments in wall paintings. 
                        </td>
      </tr>
      <tr bgcolor="#87b1f1">
         <td class="TableLeft">XRF</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">Elemental analyses of stones, metals, wall and easel paintings, and other objects. </td>
      </tr>
      <tr bgcolor="white">
         <td class="TableLeft">Vis-NIR spectroscopy</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">Colorimetric measurements and, possibly, identification of pigments. Measurement of possible colour changing after restoration.</td>
      </tr>
      <tr bgcolor="#87b1f1">
         <td class="TableLeft">UV-vis spectroscopy</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">
            <i>In situ</i> non-destructive identification of the presence of organic substances. 
                        </td>
      </tr>
      <tr bgcolor="white">
         <td class="TableLeft">Fluorimetry</td>
         <td class="TableLeft">
            <i>In situ</i> detection of the distribution of organic molecules
                        </td>
      </tr>
      <tr bgcolor="#87b1f1">
         <td class="TableLeft">Drilling resistance measurement </td>
         <td class="TableLeft">Hardness of rocks used for monuments and sculptures</td>
      </tr>
   </tbody>
</table>
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! Thank you so much, @Dimitre. You are a star! Indeed, the task came with some CSS files (though my manager said that they were optional). Therefore, your speculation is exactly spot on!! Quick question though, what's the run.bat file all about?? I mean, what role does it play in this context?? Cheers buddy, I owe you a pint! –  Lewis Jones Oct 18 '12 at 19:38
    
@LewisJones, You are welcome. As for the run.bat file, it contains the command-line utility invocation (that otherwise one would have to type by hand in the DOS window) that invokes the Saxon XSLT processor, specifying the source XML file, the XSLT file and the output file where the results of the transformation should be written. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 18 '12 at 20:04
    
Thanks again Dimitre. I now have one slight problem though: what do I need to do in order to separate the title "Table of analytical techniques" from the two left and right table headers "Analytical technique" and "Application"? This title needs to stand out a bit from the two table headers when the table appears in the browser. I have tried everything to no avail. I have even tried the CSS align-center code but it's simply not working. Any ideas please? –  Lewis Jones Oct 19 '12 at 13:36
    
@LewisJones, It is better to ask this as a separate question tagged as "html" and "css". I am not the best specialist in these areas, but I would try using a h{n} element (N in 1 to 3) and add a specific CSS for this h{N} with all CSS properties that I need. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 19 '12 at 14:01
    
Hey Dimitre guess what?! Your h{N} tip worked like charm! Simply amazing. The funny thing is I played with it all day today, but it didn't work until after I had looked at it from your perspective! Thank you so much brother, you are a great teacher. I'd go ahead and tutor at Harvard if I were you. Oh by the way, I had a quick look at your blog as well, great stuff! Anyway, thank you so much for everything Dimitre. –  Lewis Jones Oct 19 '12 at 15:19

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